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Welcome to OE Global19!

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The conference program is rich and diverse representing the current state of open education around the world.

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Tuesday, November 26
 

08:00

Registration
Tuesday November 26, 2019 08:00 - 09:00
BL28 ground floor entrance reception area

09:00

Welcome & Orientation to Conference
Welcome: 
  • Prof. Lamberto Duò, full professor in Experimental Physics and Rector Delegate for Education and Counselling, Politecnico di Milano
  • Paul Stacey, Executive Director, Open Education Consortium

Orientation to the Program:
  • Chrissi Nerantzi, Program Chair, Manchester Metropolitan University

Speakers
avatar for Chrissi Nerantzi

Chrissi Nerantzi

Principal Lecturer in Academic CPD, Manchester Metropolitan University
Chrissi Nerantzi (@chrissinerantzi): Is a Principal Lecturer in Academic CPD in the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at Manchester Metropolitan University in the United Kingdom. Her approach is playful and experimental and she specialises in creative, innovative and... Read More →
avatar for Paul Stacey

Paul Stacey

Executive Director, Open Education Consortium
Paul is the Executive Director of the Open Education Consortium (OEC) a global, non-profit, members-based network of open education institutions and organizations. OEC represents its members providing advocacy and leadership to advance open education globally. OEC works to build open... Read More →
avatar for Lamberto Duò

Lamberto Duò

Rector’s delegate for education and counselling., POLIMI
Associate Professor of Experimental Physics at the Milan Polytechnic since 1999. Director of the Metrological Center of the Politecnico di Milano.


Tuesday November 26, 2019 09:00 - 09:10
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

09:10

Opening Address: Open Education and the Third Mission of Universities
The role of Open Education is key to pursue the Third Mission of Universities, since it implies a wider and deeper collaboration of the Universities with their social scenario from a local to a global dimension. The engagement of higher education institutions in strengthening their relationship with social subjects might pave the way to new responses to present challenges. Open Education and its branches are a fertile ground to make collaborative knowledge creation blossoms.

Speakers
DB

dr. Brigida Blasi

Italian National Agency for the Evaluation of the University and Research Systems ANVUR


Tuesday November 26, 2019 09:10 - 09:30
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

09:30

Keynote: Students: Storytellers and Creators of Their Own Open Futures
Students are in all our minds with different roles: learners; lifelong learners; next generation of decision makers; today’s and tomorrow’s citizens. We are all working for them, but still students often have little or no voice in these contexts. There is a growing debate around the type of skills, competencies, knowledge and attitudes required for them to constructively face global challenges, to become active citizens and participants in the knowledge economy. What kind of future do students envision for education? What is the role of Open Education in this process? But first: are students aware of“Open Education”? Are they engaging in “Open Practices”? If yes, how? Are they actively contributing to the creation of knowledge and growth of Open Contents? Would they, if they knew? Moreover: would it be worth it, in their perspective? Let’s ask them. Students are the protagonists of this keynote, and the work behind the scenes to support their learning success is the other part of the story we are going to tell together.
Here you can find the script of our keynote, with links to the students video, the slides, our projects:
https://tinyurl.com/students-keynote  

Speakers
TR

Trudi Radtke

College of the Canyons
avatar for Robert Queckenberg

Robert Queckenberg

Initiator, Ruhr-Universität Bochum
I am passionate about peer teaching, science and TEDx among many other things. Always on the lookout for ideas and inspiration both as a deeply curious human being and as a curator of TEDx events.
avatar for Guilia Boggiali

Guilia Boggiali

Student, Polimi
avatar for Paola Corti

Paola Corti

Project Manager, Politecnico di Milano
Paola Corti works as Project Manager and instructional designer at METID (Metodi E Tecnologie Innovative per la Didattica – Innovative Methods and Technologies for Learning), the teaching and learning innovation unit of Politecnico di Milano (Italy). METID supports teachers in adopting... Read More →


Tuesday November 26, 2019 09:30 - 10:30
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

10:30

Coffee/Tea Break
Tuesday November 26, 2019 10:30 - 10:45
Break Area

10:45

Mapping the impact of Open Education in the South-Mediterranean universities: the OpenMed project
The OpenMed project (www.openmedproject.eu), funded by the Erasmus+ programme of the European Union, aimed at building capacities in Open Education [OE] in the South-Mediterranean, with a particular focus on higher education [HE] in Morocco, Palestine, Jordan and Egypt, which included the development of a series of skills, from Open-Licensing to policy making, curriculum design and adoption of Open Educational Practices [OEP]. A year after the course ended, and 6 months after project finished, an assessment was carried to map impact at individual, institutional and HE regional level.

Before starting the capacity building intervention, the learners were asked about their confidence in a series of OE criteria at the heart of the OpenMed course. Then, most of the participants, rated themselves mostly at mildly-confident with significant areas of slightly-confident or not confident at all. In the post-course evaluation survey, these questions were repeated, and the data showcased that their confidence levels have risen, as they portrayed themselves as confident or very-confident. A year after the course completion, the participants were assessed in the same criteria, to analyse whether if by putting learning into praxis, has made them more or less confident in OEP. The assessment compared the data obtained at the end of the course on impact at institutional level, with the data given by institutional leaders to track the adoption of the OpenMed Recommendations to University leaders and policymakers for opening up Higher Education in the South-Mediterranean.

The impact assessment used a methodology developed to assess the impact of online courses in open government and open data to build capacities for public servants, funded by the Inter American Development Bank and led by the Latin American Initiative for Open Data. This instrument was adopted by OpenMed to improve it towards ensuring common understanding of the value of the impact assessment.

Speakers
avatar for Javiera Atenas

Javiera Atenas

Research Lead, Open Education Policy Lab - OEGW
avatar for Daniel Villar-Onrubia

Daniel Villar-Onrubia

University of Coventry


Tuesday November 26, 2019 10:45 - 11:15
BL27.06 ground floor classroom - Presentations

10:45

Promoting Open Educational Practices Among Practitioners
In order to promote open educational practices (OEP) among practitioners, four Continuing Professional Development MOOCs (CPD MOOCs) were designed and developed using scenario-based learning (SBL) as a pedagogical framework. Specific learning outcomes for each CPD MOOC were formulated in line with the key competency to be achieved by the learners. This was, ‘the ability to integrate OER and adopt OEP in professional practice’. As part of the SBL approach, learners were situated in authentic learning scenarios, where they faced challenges in the form of learning/assessment tasks. To facilitate the completion of these tasks and the challenges they posed, three inter-linked learning/assessment tasks were designed, supported with learning resources. These were: 1.) An individual ‘creation’ of an artefact to promote creative learning; 2.) Sharing of the creations in a peer-facilitated discussion forum to encourage collaborative learning and 3.) Writing of a self-reflection to promote reflective learning. An in-depth content analysis of these three types of assessment tasks submitted by a group of fifteen practitioners who successfully completed all four CPD MOOCs was conducted to ascertain the effects of the SBL design strategies adopted in the CPD MOOCs on their professional development. This paper explores the effects of the specific design strategies of the learning/assessment tasks on the professional development of practitioners, in relation to the adoption of OEP in their professional practice.

Speakers
avatar for Shironica P. Karunanayaka

Shironica P. Karunanayaka

Dean/Faculty of Education; Professor in Educational Technology, The Open University of Sri Lanka
SN

Som Naidu

The University of the South Pacific


Tuesday November 26, 2019 10:45 - 11:15
BL27.05 ground floor classroom - Presentations

10:45

A survey of the issues and challenges of OER implementations in Canadian provinces
An overview of the Canadian experiences in implementing OER initiatives at the higher education level will include evidence of impacts and of the main issues and challenges identified by institutions and organizations in the different provinces. The main issue for OER supporters in Canada is that of raising awareness among students and faculty. Today, even after more than 20 years of activity, OER are still not commonly known in our institutions and governments. There is an obvious need for more campaigns to raise awareness that could include local, provincial and national conferences focusing on OER issues.

Another issue concerns the restrictions on the use of commercial content, that can drive faculty and students to OER. Technological Protection Measures (TPM) restrict the user's device, while tracking their activities. It is used by publishers to control, limit and restrict how learners and others can use their materials. TPM are further supported by End User License Agreements, prohibiting users from accessing content or changing parameters in the content even if they have a fair dealing right to do so.

A side issue having some effect on OER acceptance in Canada is the “large and liberal” interpretation of fair dealing by the Supreme Court of Canada, combined with the addition of “education” as one of the uses for which fair dealing applies in the Copyright Modernization Act 2012. Because of these changes, faculty and institutions can now make reasonable use of substantial portions of copyright-restricted content. Sharing of content among institutions is encouraged by governments, but it becomes problematic with restrictive licences. OER are usually cost-effective because they are free of charge and free of costs associated with negotiating licences and clearing copyright. The ability to change OER is important for educators who wish to frequently adapt or update the content.

Speakers
avatar for Rory McGreal

Rory McGreal

Professor, Athabasca University
I am the UNESCO/Commonwealth of Learning/International Council for Open and Distance Education Chair in Open Educational Resources and the director of TEKRI at Athabasca University


Tuesday November 26, 2019 10:45 - 11:15
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

10:45

My-MI: understanding the importance of CC licenses to create a collaborative experience guide of Milan (Part I)
What better opportunity to explore the potential of Open Education than through a collaborative workshop with people from all over the world that share their experience of Milan?

The aim of the two-days’ workshop is the creation of a collaborative "experiential guide" that represents Milan from the participants point of view, showing the value of sharing to build new collective knowledge. The guide will have a unique value because it will be created by the OE Global 2019 Convention participants and will be available on the Convention to be used by anyone.

During the workshop, participants will learn how to assign and manage Creative Commons licenses while building the guide that is the result obtained by sharing everyone's knowledge and personal experience.
Through co-design tools we will build "MY-MI", an unconventional, funny, non-linear guide of Milan, which will narrate the individual participant experiences lived within the city and the Politecnico.

1st day activities

In this first workshop day we will build together the contents of the guide. Each participant will share its own experiences related to the assigned theme and, with the help of tutors, will confer a specific CC license to the content produced. The material will then be shared on an online platform and will represent the resources from which to start the second day of the workshop.

Please bring your own device, better if tablet or notebook. If you can't, the group will support you, don't worry!
Please add this workshop to your sched if you are willing to join us, so that we can see in advance how many participants are going to be there, for logistic reasons.

Participation in both workshops is not mandatory.

Speakers
avatar for Prof. Maria Rita Canina

Prof. Maria Rita Canina

IDEActivity Center, Department of Design at Politecnico di Milano
PL

Prof. Laura Anselmi

IDEActivity Centre, Department of Design at Politecnico di Milano
avatar for Carmen Bruno

Carmen Bruno

PhD Student, IDEActivity Center, Department of Design at Politecnico di Milano


Tuesday November 26, 2019 10:45 - 12:15
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

11:15

The Model of the Willingness to Pay for OCW in Taiwan
Artists
avatar for Ta-Wei Li

Ta-Wei Li

Chairman, Taiwan Open Course and Education Consortium
YH

Yu-Lun Huang

National Chiao Tung University


Tuesday November 26, 2019 11:15 - 11:30
BL28 open space

11:15

Assessing the Impact of “Open Pedagogy” on Student Skills Mastery in First-Year Composition
This session presents the results of a 2016 classroom research study assessing the impact of open pedagogy on student skills mastery in a first-year English Composition course at a community college in the United States. Ninety-two students in five sections used the same free OER course materials, but two sections were given traditional assignments (i.e. formal essays and grammar exercises) and the other three sections were given "open" assignments that involved designing and remixing open resources. Assignment results and other course metrics used to investigate the impact on student skills mastery yielded no statistically significant differences in performance between the student groups, which suggests that there may be no harm in shifting away from the traditional “disposable” assignment.

Participants will get a detailed overview of the study's design, implementation, and results, as well as the opportunity to discuss how research in the impact of open pedagogy might be best designed.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Bloom

Matthew Bloom

English Faculty / OER Coordinator, Maricopa Community Colleges


Tuesday November 26, 2019 11:15 - 11:45
BL27.06 ground floor classroom - Presentations

11:15

Promoting Campus-wide OER adoption in a State University System
A case study of a program I’m undertaking, promoting OER acceptance and adoption in a small university within a statewide public higher-ed system in the US. I’ll examine the interests and priorities of five stakeholder constituencies: students, faculty, librarians, administration, and learning system providers (textbook publishers and LMS). And I’ll discuss how I have educated each stakeholder group on the concerns of the others and have built synergies between these groups both on my university’s campus and across a statewide public higher-ed system. My hope is that documenting my work and the challenges and successes I experience will provide insights for others doing the same work elsewhere.

Speakers
avatar for Dan Allosso

Dan Allosso

Asst. Professor, Bemidji State University
I teach Environmental, US, and World History at Bemidji State and reuse, remix, edit, and author OER for my courses. Planning to get 100% away from commercial textbooks by end of 2019-20 academic year.


Tuesday November 26, 2019 11:15 - 11:45
BL27.05 ground floor classroom - Presentations

11:15

Open Education for Better World
The UNESCO Chair on Open Technologies for Open Educational Resources (OER) and Open Learning at the Jozef Stefan Institute and University of Nova Gorica have launched a tuition-free international online mentoring programme with the title Open Education for a Better World, to unlock the potential of open education in achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). The tuition-free international online mentoring programme with the title Open Education for a Better World, was established to unlock the potential of open education in achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). The programme is at the forefront of combining Open Educational Resources (OER) and SDGs and helping create a more personal approach towards building OER that can inform, educate and present value in new ways. The programme is an attempt towards implementing the 2017 Ljubljana OER Action Plan and is a focused action to mainstream open-licensed resources to build Knowledge Societies and achieve the 2030 Sustainable Development Goal 4 on “quality and lifelong education.” The Mentoring Programme “Open Education for a Better World” (OE4BW) Is a half year-long programme for developers from all backgrounds, regions, and continents with the potential and desire to employ Open Educational Resources to solve large-scale and relevant problems significant concerning today's global landscape. The student's projects being mentored are applicative ideas that use Open Educational Resources; as a result to respond to real-life specific educational challenges. The goal of the programme is to design and implement an OER that will unlock potentials and bring benefits to many at no cost for participants.
The program supports the development and implementation of freely accessible modules and resources for online education on topics with social impact according to the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Speakers
PD

Prof. Dr. Tanja Urbančič

University of Nova Gorica
MJ

Mitja Jermol

Jozef Stefan Institute
AP

Anja Polajnar

Jožef Stefan Institute
AF

Ana Fabjan

Jožef Stefan Institute


Tuesday November 26, 2019 11:15 - 11:45
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

11:45

Changing Educational Policies with a Collective Impact
The Free Education Alliance unites organizations, institutions and individuals that promote Open Education. The alliance is both a forum and a driving force for political and social change in the diverse educational landscape of Germany.

During this session, I would like to talk about how the alliance of a variety of actors works together in order to set impulses in the German educational sector and how our suggestions on how Open Education can improve education, are being heard by decision makers. Also, I want to elaborate the advantages and challenges of the collaborative process within a divers alliance.

Although Germany’s national government agreed upon a comprehensive strategy for Open Educational Resources (OER), its actions testify to a clear reversal of that commitment. Even though the words 'open' and 'digital' are increasingly used in the political scene, digitization is widely reduced to a matter of technical infrastructures. German politicians’ initiatives in this field are short-sighted, vary from one federal state to another, and ignore the necessary advancement of open infrastructure and cultural change that is required for a practice of sharing and participation.

In order to “digitize education” governments and political decision-makers of the German federal states are focusing on the promotion and expansion of closed ecosystems and marketplaces. The means contradict the goal of teaching people digital literacies and the critically reflected confrontation with the internet. This promotion, which is geared towards the preservation of traditional and rigid structures, shows an outdated understanding of education within and for a digital society. A sustainable transfer of competencies – that can be realized through open practices such as working with or producing open educational resources – is rarely considered as an objective.

The Free Education Alliance shows how holistic educational processes can be promoted through Open Education using a Collective Impact approach.

Speakers
avatar for Dominik Theis

Dominik Theis

Coordinator, Wikimedia Deutschland e. V.: Free Education Alliance



Tuesday November 26, 2019 11:45 - 12:15
BL27.06 ground floor classroom - Presentations

11:45

A study on practices around reuse
To gain more insight into practices of reuse of open learning materials, a survey study has been conducted in two different settings: 1) within a Bachelor program for ICT offered within one institution and 2) in a national Community of Practice on Bachelor of Nursing.

A total of 74 teachers responded on the survey for ICT and 118 teachers for Nursing. An overview of results:

Learning materials most used (overall)
Nursing: Slide decks, assignments, video; ICT: Assignments, slide decks, video

Learning materials most reused as-is (relative)
Nursing: Papers, video, 3rd party courses; ICT: Papers, digital books, digital tools (e.g. online coding environment)

Learning materials most reused with adaptations (relative)
Nursing: Courses from colleagues, slide decks, assignments; ICT: Courses from colleagues, 3rd party courses, slide decks

Learning materials created with no or limited reuse (relative)
Nursing: Tests, games, slide decks; ICT: Tests, assignments, slide decks

Chi-square tests have been executed to find out if observed differences on the use of learning materials are statistically significant. These tests revealed that reuse is significantly more common among teachers in ICT than in Nursing. Furthermore, significant differences were found in the types of learning materials used by teachers in the two settings. Possible explanations for these results as provided by participants during a presentation are differences in pedagogy, different demands from society on the programs and ICT professionals being more accustomed to reuse. Additional research is needed to explore these differences.

In the coming months, we plan to execute the survey within several Universities of Applied Sciences across different disciplines to gain more insight in the extent and the different types of reuse. The results can be used to provide more tailored support to teachers on adoption of OER. In the presentation we will report and discuss the results of this study.

Speakers
avatar for Marjon Baas

Marjon Baas

Educational Technologist, PhD student, Saxion University of Applied Sciences
avatar for Robert Schuwer

Robert Schuwer

Fontys University of Applied Sciences


Tuesday November 26, 2019 11:45 - 12:15
BL27.05 ground floor classroom - Presentations

11:45

Same Same but different: exploring status, diffusion and usage of OER across educational sectors in Germany
Open Educational Resources (OER) and the idea of Openness has gained momentum in the educational discourse. This thrust is not only visible in the latter but becomes manifest in the thrive of several repositories that have been established worldwide. However, a constant gap can be observed between the availability and the usage of OER in education. With this article, we contribute to this lack of research by presenting findings from a cross-educational-analysis of OER diffusion and usage in Germany. More precisely, we endeavour to disclose idiosyncrasies and specific circumstances that exist within and across different educational sectors. In terms of methods, we conducted semi-structured interviews with five experts, all members of a consortium project that encompassed 25 OER projects. As key findings, we identified specific characteristics encapsulated in each sector that require further research. With regard to schools, teachers desire a centralised platform for OER providing prepared material that is ready for use in their teaching. In higher education, altering institutional policies and the proper recognition of teaching has to be fortified to allow OER to occupy a more prominent role. In vocational education, due to the low degree of awareness and the absence of repositories, OER are in an early stage. Adult education is challenging to capture in terms of OER as it is a rather unregulated and a less institutionalised sector. For further research, we suggest that this research should especially comprise to investigate whether our findings resonate with findings of other European countries.

Speakers
DO

Daniel Otto

Learning Lab, University of Duisburg-Essen


Tuesday November 26, 2019 11:45 - 12:15
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

12:15

Lunch
Tuesday November 26, 2019 12:15 - 13:00
Break Area

13:00

Creating various online learning opportunities using a Small Private Online Course environment
An online learning environment using Open edX named "KoALA" was launched in April 2018 at Kyoto University as a Small Private Online Course (SPOC) environment. By using it, instructors can provide their online learning materials for on-campus students. Like Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), lecture videos, grading assignments, and other educational resources can be provided as a single course through KoALA. Also, KoALA can offer online learning materials in flexible formats according to instructors' needs such as those for flipped learning, remedial education and so forth. Some of the courses are open to the public if the purpose of the course is a social contribution, potential student acquisition and so on. A feedback session between the instructor, course production team and educational assessment team is held after each course end date by use of learners' course survey results and learning activities from analytics tool provided by Open edX. The session works as an opportunity for instructor's reflection and course improvement and plays a vital role in sustainable course offerings. This process of feedback is employed in our MOOC project. As our university has been offering MOOCs through edX, a large part of processes can be similarly applied to an on-campus case.
In this presentation, the background and process of building the online learning environment and unique practices by using it will be introduced. Also, prospective of such an environment are discussed especially in terms of the difference between MOOC and SPOC.

Speakers
HS

Hiroyuki Sakai

Kyoto University
IW

Isanka Wijerathne

Kyoto University
MO

Masako Okamoto

Kyoto University



Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:00 - 13:45
BL28 open space

13:00

OER Adoption and Creation through Faculty-Library Collaboration
The poster will present the open education practice in undergraduate Introduction to Sociology for non-sociologist class at the American University of Central Asia. This is the second phase of library-faculty collaboration to implement OER.

The students were encouraged to develop their own content as OER, which further will be used for this course in the following semesters. Based on their interest, students create their own content to reflect on societal issues in the country through their final projects, which will include both written and visual material. These projects are intended to apply the knowledge students were able to attain in the classroom in practice through analyzing certain sites in the city they live in. Then with the help of librarians, student authored content was presented as OER, allowing creation of an additional learning resource which will be further utilized for this course. For this project, we used Pressbook platform, which allows creating OER in multiple formats. This is our first experience of engaging students to create OER. Students were able to consider and select from different formats to present their content; learn basics of instructional design which is needed to create OER; participate in peer-review to improve OER;
And engage in active learning. The project helped provide opportunities for deep and active learning through open pedagogy approach. Students are also engaged in co-learning, as this project requires collaboration, review and feedback of peers’ works.

Speakers
avatar for Jyldyz Bekbalaeva

Jyldyz Bekbalaeva

Director of Library, American University of Central Asia
Jyldyz Bekbalaeva is Director of the Library at American University of Central Asia, where she manages library services and resources. Jyldyz is currently a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at Georgetown University, working on such topics as information literacy, instructional technology... Read More →
AN

Aisuluu Namasbek Kyzy

American University of Central Asia


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:00 - 13:45
BL28 open space

13:00

Reimagining Library Instruction to Support Open Pedagogy Initiatives: A Case Study
The library instruction program at Roger Williams University (RWU) exists to provide students with information literacy skills to aid them in the successful completion of their academic assignments. Traditionally, the program has focused on providing assignment-based instruction in 50-80 minute sessions, where each is tailored to help students meet specific threshold concepts integrated throughout the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework that will enable them to complete these assignments, most of which tend to be research papers. With faculty interest in both Open Educational Resources and Open-enabled Pedagogy (OEP) gaining steam on campus, one librarian has seen a drastic shift in the nature of the assignments of which students are being asked to complete in these library instruction sessions. This poster will examine the author’s experience in shifting her own pedagogy in order to provide scaffolded support of concepts such as copyright & fair use, open licensing, and author’s rights -- all of which are essential for students engaged in open-enabled pedagogy and renewable assignments to grasp. The author will seek to synthesize her own experiences in order to offer concrete takeaways for academic librarians preparing to engage with faculty and students engaged in OEP on their own campuses.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsey Gumb

Lindsey Gumb

Scholarly Communications Librarian, Roger Williams University


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:00 - 13:45
BL28 open space

13:00

Sharing the End of the World: Students' Perception of Their Self-Efficacy in the Creation of Open Educational Resources
Poster presentation of a case study of an undergraduate Honors Political Science course in which students create podcasts discussing political issues surrounding various end-of-the-world scenarios. The podcasts are intended to be used as pedagogical objects in other courses, and otherwise freely available under a Creative Commons license in podcast collections such as iTunes. The study examines student perceptions of their own self-efficacy and satisfaction with their work while knowing that it will be made openly available to others and used to teach students in future courses.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Di Valentino

Lisa Di Valentino

Law & Public Policy Librarian, University of Massachusetts Amherst
I am the Law & Public Policy Librarian at University of Massachusetts Amherst, responsible for all things government and politics. My research interests include copyright law and policy, information privacy, digital literacy, and pedagogy in higher education.
avatar for Sarah Hutton

Sarah Hutton

Head, Undergraduate Teaching & Learning Services, University of Massachusetts Amherst
I am a librarian, working on a Ph.D. in higher ED (policy). My research looks at the intersection of student motivation theory and open education/pedagogy; I also research the use (and overuse) of rhetoric in higher education programming and policy. If you are interested in eating... Read More →
PM

Paul Musgrave

University of Massachusetts Amherst


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:00 - 13:45
BL28 open space

13:00

Using “Shin-Godzilla” as Material for OER-based Course Development
In this presentation, we will introduce an example of nuclear power OER and course development at Japanese universities. As a result of the tragic aftermath of the Tohoku earthquake, there has been more interest in nuclear power education in Japan. Thus, at the Hokkaido University Center for Open Education, we worked with the Hokkaido University Faculty of Engineering to produce OER capable of educating people about the basics of nuclear power. We helped the Faculty of Engineering to create educational videos which we then available on our OpenCourseWare website. These resources were later utilized for a MOOC on nuclear power. Later, eight faculty of engineering professors collaborated on a flipped-classroom course using these resources. This course was given on-campus at Hokkaido University.
Both science and humanities students participated in the flipped-classroom course. As such, it was necessary to make the course accessible even to students without a basic grasp of Physics. It was also necessary to create a classroom environment that could compensate for differences in prior knowledge about nuclear power between students.
Hence, we suggested that instructors 1) use the OER utilized for the initial MOOC because of their usefulness to all learners of all levels, and 2) that they use "Shin Godzilla" (which is about a monster borne from nuclear-radiation) as a course-theme. Unique, “Shin Godzilla” themed assignments were designed on the assumption that students had already studied using the OER before class. Concretely speaking, assignments included tasks such as identifying the Geiger counter in the movie and explain inaccuracies in its use (allowing students to learn how to correctly measure radiation). This course was given from 2016 to 2018. 23 and 28 students participated each year (including remote participants). As students show, we both used OER to help educate students and developed a more appealing course.

Speakers
avatar for Kazuya Kobayashi

Kazuya Kobayashi

doctor researcher, Hokkaido University Center For Open Education
I originally studied philosophy. Currently, I am engaged in MOOC management and support of flipping classes at Hokkaido University in Japan.・ What are some ways to make PBL on fiction more effective?・ What are the methods of education on social issues?
HT

Hiroaki Tanaka

Hokkaido University Center For Open Education


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:00 - 13:45
BL28 open space

13:00

The Quality Reference Framework (QRF) for improving the design and evaluation of MOOCs
Come to our poster presentation!
This poster introduces "The Quality Reference Framework (QRF) for the Quality of MOOCs". It was developed by the European Alliance for the Quality of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), called MOOQ.

MOOQ was started due to the huge demand for improving the quality of MOOCs from research as well as from practice (Daniel, 2012; Liyanagunawardena, Adams, & Williams, 2013; Gaskell, & Mills, 2014; Conole, 2015; Reich, 2015; Veletsianos, & Shepherdson, 2016; Stracke, 2017a, 2017b, 2018, 2019; Zawacki-Richter, Bozkurt, Alturki, & Aldraiweesh, 2018).

Overall, MOOQ could address and reach out to more than 100,000 MOOC learners, designers, facilitators and providers through dissemination and exploitation activities.

Main objective of MOOQ was the development of the QRF finalized and published in the year 2018 after more than three years of revisions. In close cooperation with leading international institutions and associations, MOOQ could involve in the QRF finalization more than 10,000 MOOC learners, designers, facilitators and providers through divers means including the Mixed Methods research with the Global MOOC Quality Survey (GMQS), the MOOQ presentations and workshops at regional, European and international conferences as well as communication and collaboration in traditional channels and social media. The QRF consists of three dimensions: Phases, Perspectives and Roles. They were carefully selected, discussed and agreed with all MOOC stakeholder groups to cover the different views, requirements and responsibilities during the lifetime of a MOOC.

The poster presents the two QRF quality instruments: the QRF Key Quality Criteria for MOOC experts and the QRF Quality Checklist for MOOC beginners.

Speakers
avatar for Christian M. Stracke

Christian M. Stracke

ICDE Chair in OER and Associate Professor for Open Education, Open University of the Netherlands
Dr. Christian M. Stracke is ICDE Chair in OER and Associate Professor for Open Education at the Welten Institute of the Open University of the Netherlands (OUNL) (www.ou.nl/web/welten-institute). In addition he is Advisory Professor at the East China Normal University (ECNU) in Shanghai... Read More →


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:00 - 13:45
BL28 open space

13:00

Using Openness and International Collegiality to Improve Teaching Pedagogy
The art of effective teaching is continually under the spotlight no matter the stage of education and becomes a point of difference when students are selecting institutions to start or continue their pursuit of knowledge. As such, universities seek to provide more engaged learning for their students creating within academics a desire to improve their teaching skills. While traditional professional development has its place, more diverse approaches to academic professional development should be considered that create opportunities for more practice-based, peer-supported and collaborative engagement that empowers academics to share ideas and practices, problem solve and feel part of a network or community. 

This poster contribution reports on the first stage of the Teaching and Learning Conversations global project (TLCglobal). Using an Open Education approach, a project between Manchester Metropolitan University (UK) and Charles Sturt University (AU) started in 2018 where academics from both institutions, collaborated to discuss blended teaching practice online. Over 14 weeks, these academics shared and interrogated each other’s teaching methods with a collective aim of supporting and developing one another. A number of benefits manifested themselves as this project unfolded. Working in pairs, the conversations between the academics were impactful, founded on an erstwhile desire to improve teaching and committed to achieving an outcome in the project. Interestingly, and importantly, the cross-discipline pairings facilitated the critical and collegiate analysis. Avoiding intra-discipline pairings eschewed rivalry and subject-specific discussion and created ‘safe spaces’ which liberated the conversations providing opportunities for open and meaningful shared reflections to materialise. 

Invigorated, academics experimented and implemented newly found ideas into their own practice and developed a greater understanding of the different pedagogies. Due to the project’s success, in 2019, it will expand further to include more academics and institutions, and continue to provide open, cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary global conversation to facilitate professional development.

Speakers
avatar for David Smith

David Smith

Head, School of Education, Charles Sturt University
My overriding interest is what elements will motivate individuals to learn effectively. I have worked in Austria and Australia and experimented and fostered development in technology and pedagogy all with learning effectiveness in mind.
avatar for Chrissi Nerantzi

Chrissi Nerantzi

Principal Lecturer in Academic CPD, Manchester Metropolitan University
Chrissi Nerantzi (@chrissinerantzi): Is a Principal Lecturer in Academic CPD in the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at Manchester Metropolitan University in the United Kingdom. Her approach is playful and experimental and she specialises in creative, innovative and... Read More →
DK

Damian Keil

Manchester Metropolitan University
GC

Gerasimos Chatzidamianos

Manchester Metropolitan University
avatar for Jacqueline Tinkler

Jacqueline Tinkler

Lecturer, Charles Sturt University
HC

Heather Campbell

Charles Sturt University


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:00 - 13:45
BL28 open space

13:45

Boosting collaborations and partnerships across Latin America: Building a regional network to advance open education in the region
The Open Education Consortium launches, OE LATAM (Open Education Latin America). A network aiming to provide a forum for strengthening, coordinating, and supporting open education across the latinamerican region. Providing a platform were their unique open educational goals, needs & challenges are being addressed. This community building effort provides a space of dialog were ideas, opinions and thoughts can be interchanged.  A space where collaboration and partnership opportunities are created.

This Lightning Talk will describe the process behing the creation of the network.

Speakers
avatar for Marcela Morales

Marcela Morales

Community Relations Director, Open Education Consortium
Marcela es una incesante promotora del acceso al conocimiento y una verdadera creyente en el poder que la educación tiene para transformar vidas y sociedades alrededor del mundo. Como Directora de Relaciones Comunitarias para el 'Open Education Consortium’, Marcela trabaja incansablemente... Read More →
avatar for María Soledad Ramírez Montoya

María Soledad Ramírez Montoya

Tecnológico de Monterrey
avatar for Werner Westermann

Werner Westermann

Civic Education Program, Coordinator, Library of National Congress
History, Geography and Civics teacher, kidnaped by open technologies and practices to amplify access and raise quality of learning and reaching. Open Education advocate for more than a decade, more enthusiastic/less academic OER researcher, CC IOL fellow pushing Open Educational Policy. On the way of building spanish-language Open Textbooks platform... Read More →
avatar for Virginia Rodés

Virginia Rodés

Associate Professor, Universidad de la República
Coordinates the Virtual Learning Environments Program (ProEVA) and the Open Educational Resources Center (Núcleo REAA) of the Universidad de la República, Uruguay She has developed research in conjunction with academic networks in Latin America and Europe. In the framework of these... Read More →


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:45 - 13:55
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

13:45

The butterfly effect: how connecting digital learning materials to the constructive alignment theory may accelerate adoption of OER
On 1 January 2019, an ambitious program took off to boost innovation of Higher Education in the Netherlands using ICT. The shared ambitions of this program are: better connection to the job market, making education more flexible and learning smarter and better by using technology. The program is divided into 7 areas (zones. In each zone, institutions of HE cooperate to realize these ambitions.

One of the zones is called “Towards digital (open) educational resources”. In this zone, 7 universities and 2 UoAS collaborate to realize the ambition that in 2023, HE institutions in the Netherlands are able to offer teachers and learners the opportunity to determine and use an optimal mix of learning resources. To accomplish this, a.o. improving the technical and organisational infrastructure and enhancing an open infrastructure seamless and transparent with a more closed one is needed. Stimulating the use of open resources is part of the ambition, but open is not considered a dogma in the optimal mix. This is an important difference compared to other programs aiming at stimulating sharing and reuse of OER, treating openness in isolation with non-open resources. We believe that this difference, together with taking the educational vision of the teacher as starting point will widen adoption of open sharing and reuse.

For 2019, the main activity of this zone is to conduct research into the ways students and teachers determine their optimal mix of learning resources and the underlying principles. The results will be the basis for the zone activities in the remaining time of the program. Other activities in 2019 comprise improvements to the available national technical infrastructure and creating awareness among teachers about the opportunities of open pedagogy and open educational practices. In the presentation we will report about the activities and the results of the research.

Speakers
avatar for Marijn Post

Marijn Post

Hogeschool Arnhem Nijmegen/ Wageningen UR
At the moment I am an advisor in ICT and Learning at the HAN university for applied sciences but until oktober 2019 I worked as an information specialist at WUR-Library. I am an expert in open learning materials, copyrights, and implementing ICT to improve education. At the moment... Read More →
avatar for Lieke Rensink

Lieke Rensink

Projectleader OER, SURF
NW

Nicole Will

Delft University of Technology
avatar for Robert Schuwer

Robert Schuwer

Fontys University of Applied Sciences
avatar for Gaby Lutgens

Gaby Lutgens

Library | Education, skills & support, Maastricht University
My focus is on educational innovation, mainly from the perspective of e-learning and technology enhanced education. Open (and online) education combines both and offer a challenge to organise well. The library looks into services we can offer to teachers (creating and sharing open... Read More →
HB

Hans Beldhuis

University of Groningen
VD

Vincent de Boer

University of Groningen
CV

Cynthia van der Brugge

Leiden University
WK

Wouter Kleijheeg

Erasmus University Rotterdam
GK

Gerlien Klein

Hanze University of Applied Sciences
AS

Arjan Schalken

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
FV

Frederike Vernimmen - de Jong

Maastricht University


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:45 - 14:15
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

13:45

The ground below us, the stars above: Exploring philosophical approaches to Open Education
With this proposal we call attention to the philosophical foundations of education that have influenced the design of contemporary learning strategies and technologies. Innovation in the form of OER and MOOCs have entered the mainstream and have renewed interest in the social, political, and economic implications of educational technology. At the same time, advances in open content and technology for distance learning claim to support the democratization of education and the search for social justice, but rarely rely on philosophical frames or lenses with which to carry forward the open education movement. This presentation will begin by sharing examples of normative beliefs and values that are often taken for granted and used as moral instruments for progress without an examination of their applicability or feasibility in particular contexts.

We will present cases that are suitable to illustrate how the relationship between educational philosophy and institutionalised education has been altered by technology and draw some conclusions how to re-balance the relationship based on a more comprehensive educational framework. We will also show that in the Open Education movement, education and pedagogy are dealt with in the form of “The Elephant in the Room”, i.e. normative beliefs, assumptions and values are taken for granted and are used as moral instruments for progression without examining the feasibility of relying on certain educational or political norms (e.g. education as emancipation; social justice) in a given context.

Speakers
avatar for Markus Deimann

Markus Deimann

Researcher at Fern Universität in Hagen, FernUniversität in Hagen
avatar for Billy Meinke-Lau

Billy Meinke-Lau

OER Technologist, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:45 - 14:15
BL27.06 ground floor classroom - Presentations

13:45

Open textbook case studies: Social justice, agency and intersectionality.
Open textbook initiatives are demonstrating cost-savings in the United States and Canada. The case is therefore increasingly being made for the production and use open textbooks from an economic perspective. At the University of Cape Town (UCT), the Digital Open Textbooks for Development (DOT4D) project, which began in July 2018, is also investigating cost savings. However, the impetus for this project is premised on the potential for open textbooks to play a key role in transforming the curriculum. This is particularly relevant in the South African higher education context, where student protests from 2014-2107 called for decolonisation of the curriculum and free university education.

The DOT4D project has three components. The research process includes a landscape survey of open textbook publishing at UCT, case studies on UCT open textbook development initiatives, and an intellectual property policy landscape survey. The implementation component provides small grants to enable academics to create and adapt open textbooks. And lastly, advocacy activity engages stakeholders in the South African higher education system in a conversation around what is required to promote and sustain a scaleable, institutionally driven approach to open textbook production.

This presentation will include examples of the application of the DOT4D, social justice, agency and intersectional approach. It will highlight the role of open textbook creators as agents who have embraced an intersectional and transformative approach to collaborative authoring of teaching materials. The purpose of using this social justice approach is to identify the injustices that are present in current student access to textbooks. This research will also consider how open textbook creators are moving towards a transformed and just approach to textbook creation and use.

Speakers
GC

Glenda Cox

Lecturer, University of Cape Town
Why academics choose to share or not share their teaching materials as OER. The quality in OER debate. OER and the Library. OER and Open access.


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:45 - 14:15
BL27.05 ground floor classroom - Presentations

13:45

Fostering Open Education: A policymaking co-creation workshop
Session Table Name: Assisi

The workshop objectives are to give the participants some basic policy co-design skills, and as well as an overview of the key techniques and elements needed to opening up the arenas to foster sustainable policies. In order to support these objectives the workshop is grounded on the participation and co-creation standard developed by OGP to foster the co-creation of national commitments, and uses a set of cards and a canvas (adapted from those developed by the UK Policy Lab) aligning the elements with those recommended by the Ljubljana Action Plan, and the JRC report, Policy Approaches to Open Education.

The workshop aims to raise awareness of the international landscape, to widen participation in the policy co-creation process in specific contexts, to involving a wide range of partners to ensure the correct implementation, to gaining an overview of the opportunities and challenges of an OE policy, and to identification of the key elements the policy must comprise to foster global policy convergence [Haddad & Demsky (1995); Thompson & Cook (2014)]. By using a policy canvas and change cards, the participants consider issues such as who needs to be involved in the policy-making process, and who is needed to implement the policy considering the local context and the sociocultural issues at play, alongside with and other policies or regulatory models to draw upon. The first workshop was held at the OpenMed conference (Rome) with stakeholders from Egypt, Italy, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Spain, and UK participated. The second workshop was held at the Open Education Policy Forum (Warsaw_ with participants from Germany, Malta, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and The Netherlands The third workshop was held at OER19 (Galway), with participants from Ireland, England, Scotland, Austria, The Netherlands, Australia and Spain discussed the potential of Open Education policies at international level.

Related resources


Speakers
avatar for Javiera Atenas

Javiera Atenas

Research Lead, Open Education Policy Lab - OEGW
avatar for Leo Havemann

Leo Havemann

Digital Education Advisor / Postgraduate Researcher, Open University / University College London
Please see my other profile here:https://oeglobal2019.sched.com/leohavemann
avatar for Fabio Nascimbeni

Fabio Nascimbeni

Assistant Professor, Universidad Internacional de La Rioja
I work as assistant professor in the Universidad Internacional de La Rioja (UNIR), and I am a senior fellow of of the European Distance and eLearning Network (EDEN) and a fellow of the Centro de Estudos Sociedade e Tecnologia of the University of Sao Paulo (Brazil) and of the Nexa... Read More →
JN

Jan Neumann

Head of Legal Affairs & Organization, Hochschulbibliothekszentrum des Landes NRW
avatar for Daniel Villar-Onrubia

Daniel Villar-Onrubia

University of Coventry


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:45 - 14:50
BL27 first floor south corridor - Action Lab

13:45

Reflections on OER reuse - does it lead to change in teaching practices and beliefs?
Session Table Name: BOLZANO

OER have become mainstream in higher education institutions in the UK for what has been claimed to be their potential to transform education (Tuomi, 2013). Among the potential benefits of OER is the claim that the quality of teaching and learning materials can improve when they are made available as OER (D’Antoni, 2009). In general, OER advocates claim that as teachers understand the importance of continuous questioning and improvement of their resources and practices, they will share their experiences and lessons learnt. Through OER, teachers should make suggestions on how to better foster the development of students’ skills and competences as well as their own, and therefore, the overall quality of teaching should improve.
Based on the findings of a doctoral thesis exploring OER reuse for online language teaching for distance learners, this Action Lab will give the opportunity to participants to present examples of OER that have been reused and adapted for local contexts and to reflect on the potentials of OER reuse in terms of teachers' professional development and transformation of teaching practices and beliefs.

Speakers
HP

Helene Pulker

The Open University


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:45 - 14:50
BL27 first floor south corridor - Action Lab

13:45

H5P: CAN WE SHARE IT?
Session Table Name: GENOVA

This event is aimed at bringing together H5P users who are interested in finding an efficient way to share the many H5P activity files created worldwide (over two million, according to Joubel). H5P is explicitly designed to support OER and open license environments, with tagging and cloning of activity files. However, there is no comprehensive way to search for these files, and share them. Participants will brainstorm possible solutions to this problem, including a repository, link-sharing, dedicated open communities (Canvas, Moodle, Diigo), etc. An action plan will emerge from the session, with the goal of realizing to the fullest extent possible the sharing of H5P. Anyone interested in H5P sharing is encouraged to participate, and to bring ideas.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Ruth

Jeff Ruth

EAST STROUDSBURG UNIVERSITY
Teach Spanish in Pennsylvania, US. Sabbatical 2018-19 in Genoa, Italy. Current professional interest: H5P for Open Education.


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:45 - 14:50
BL27 first floor south corridor - Action Lab

13:45

Open Education for the Future: Leading through Communities of Practice
The concept of a Community of Practice (CoP) has been around for more than a quarter century, often used in educational settings, because “learning” is at the heart of these communities. However, this learning is different from a traditional classroom setting where the knowledge flows from an expert to learner and the expert defines the intended outcomes. Communities of practice focus on learning in a social context where mutual interest draws individuals to share and create new knowledge freely as they practice together. The outcome of this knowledge creation cannot be predicted a priori and in fact the process of learning together through practice and building community relationships is emphasized over specific outcomes or deliverables.

Educause’s definitive Communities of Practice Design Guide: A Step-by-Step Guide for Designing & Cultivating Communities of Practice in Higher Education (Cambridge, Kaplan, Suter, 2005) identified four key activities that support the identified purposes of a CoP:
• Develop Relationships and Build Trust
• Learn and Develop Practice
• Carry Out Tasks and Projects
• Create New Knowledge

Building effective communities of practice is about helping people to realize and practice their strengths in service of learning more about a topic. A community of practice should help people grow in their profession and in their leadership. Using the four activities identified in the design guide above, several communities of practice for open education will be analyzed for expressions of these activities and how they contribute to the effectiveness of the organization. Participants will also be given an opportunity to analyze and share the effectiveness of their own communities.

Speakers
avatar for Una Daly

Una Daly

Director, Community College Outreach, OpenCourseWare Consortium
I am passionate about expanding access to education through the adoption of open textbooks and open educational resources. As the Community College Outreach Director at the Open Courseware Consortium, I work with faculty and staff at community colleges to create awareness and share... Read More →
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OER Project Director, Pierce College
Librarian, AdministratorI am the OER Project Director at Tacoma Community College and I believe that adopting, adapting and accessing OER empowers faculty, students and administrations to grow educational opportunities. I've been a user, a pusher, a creator and a teacher of OER. (From... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Young

Lisa Young

Faculty Director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Scottsdale Community College
I serve Scottsdale Community College as the Instructional Design and Educational Technology faculty member. I am passionate about helping our students learn whether it be through excellent instructional design, the use of educational technology to resolve and mitigate instructional... Read More →
RG

Regina Gong

Lansing Community College
SP

Sian Proctor

South Mountain Community College


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:45 - 14:50
BL27 first floor north corridor - Action Lab

13:55

Windows and Mirrors: How OER Can Provide New Perspectives
Names, pronouns, and identities are all important in the development as humans. If we stopped to take a look at the instructional materials and books in our primary and secondary classrooms, would we see these elements? When students see themselves in the instructional materials in their classrooms, they are more likely to be engaged in their own learning. The concept of “windows and mirrors” should be considered when reviewing and implementing instructional materials. Windows allow us to see the perspective of others and mirrors allow us to see ourselves. What does this have to do with Open Educational Resources? Everything. When we leverage OER in our primary and secondary classrooms, we have the opportunity to provide new perspectives and ensure that windows and mirrors are included for all students. This presentation will address windows and mirrors and how OER can provide new perspectives to create inclusive curriculum.

Speakers
avatar for Kristina Ishmael

Kristina Ishmael

Sr. Program Mgr, Education Policy, New America
Kristina Ishmael is an educator, learner, thought leader, advocate, and agent of change. After her work in the classroom and at the state, she found herself in the nation’s capital working on education policy around instructional materials in the perfect culmination of her commitment... Read More →


Tuesday November 26, 2019 13:55 - 14:05
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

14:05

Seeing The Forest And The Trees - understanding the global open education landscape and the potential for collaboration
Open education is developing everywhere around the world. However, the big picture view of what is happening around the world is limited. The community tends not to have a shared common understanding of the global open education landscape. As the saying goes “We can’t see the forest for the trees.” Open education leaders and practitioners can see the “trees” of their own initiative or that of their region or country but not the “forest” of the global open education landscape.

Drawing on the Open Education Consortiums (OEC) unique position as a global open education member organization advocating for and supporting open education around the world, this session will map out OEC’s view of the global open education landscape. High level summaries of open education across regions of the world (Asia, Africa, North America, Oceania, Europe, etc.) will be provided. The relative importance and adoption of various forms of open education (OER, Open Access, Open Science, etc.) will be described along with specific areas of focus. Potential for collaboration across regions and around the world to increase and improve open education adoption, implementation and impact will be highlighted.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Stacey

Paul Stacey

Executive Director, Open Education Consortium
Paul is the Executive Director of the Open Education Consortium (OEC) a global, non-profit, members-based network of open education institutions and organizations. OEC represents its members providing advocacy and leadership to advance open education globally. OEC works to build open... Read More →


Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:05 - 14:15
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

14:15

More Coop, Less Co-opt
The Open Educational Technology Coop is a community of educators, technologists, and designers sharing their expertise to foster and support open infrastructure for the British Columbia post-secondary sector. No contracts or agreements are required to join us, just a willingness and ability to actively participate in our collective endeavor to: encourage technological autonomy and provide ways for students, faculty and institutions to own and control their own data, lower the barrier to participation on the open web for British Columbia faculty and students, provide a more sustainable edtech infrastructure to British Columbia higher education offering institutions more control over their teaching tools, and assist BC faculty in evaluating and making informed pedagogical decisions around open source teaching and learning applications. Open-source educational technologies are not often considered as viable institutional options in highered as advocates face challenges competing with commercial vendors responding to standard IT procurement practices. RFP processes typically favour commercial applications and limit open-source involvement in the educational technology space at most institutions. Open-source software relies on the development of communities of both developers and users in order to be successful. The success comes from sharing knowledge about how the software is constructed and can be utilized. The OpenETC pools expertise and resources to support shared open infrastructure. We promote inter-institutional collaboration and provide shared open source platforms enabling co-creation and sharing of open educational resources and approaches to open pedagogy.

Speakers
AS

Anne-Marie Scott

Apereo Software Foundation
avatar for Grant Potter

Grant Potter

Instructional Technologist, University of Northern British Columbia
Pappy with the Khaki sweatbandBowed goat potbellied barnyard that only he noticedThe old fart was smartThe old gold cloth madonnaDancin’ t’ the fiddle ‘n sawHe ran down behind the knoll‘n slipped on his wooden fishheadThe mouth worked ‘n snapped all the beesBack t’ the... Read More →
avatar for Brian Lamb

Brian Lamb

Director, Learning Technology & Innovation, Thompson Rivers University
I'm most interested in: * a vision of open education in which open practices and open technologies are at least as important as OER. * a vision of higher educational institutions that embraces their mandate as stewards of knowledge and inquiry. To me that means more permeable... Read More →


Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:15 - 14:25
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

14:20

OER Conversion with Faculty Advocates
The OER deployment model at the University of Missouri - St. Louis is transitioning to department-level grants for the 2019-2020 academic year. The evolution of our Faculty Advocate (FA) program came about to leverage further the peer-to-peer bonds of association between instructors, an on-campus OER trend that became clear following three successful rounds of faculty course-conversion grants.

To encourage widespread adoption of OER practices, several departments with multiple high-enrollment courses will house a financially-compensated FA. The Advocates will aid their departments in a two-year OER adoption process. At the process’s conclusion, all introductory coursework should be able to be completed by students at zero cost, which will help institutionalize open education as the new standard.

The first year of the adoption term is spent building the infrastructure necessary to introduce and support a cultural transition to OER within their discipline, including a comprehensive departmental resource audit; training sessions within the department; creative “hackathons” to produce open resources; and peer workshops on assessing OER materials and implementing open pedagogy in the classroom. At the first year’s conclusion, the FA would generate a detailed narrative report depicting their experience. The account would include goal statements, the results of the preliminary department analysis, an extensively detailed timeline of actions taken, and the FA’s proposals for nurturing the program’s sustainability.

The second year is the department’s turn to take the foundation laid by the FA and fully transition introductory-track courses to open educational materials. They will expand upon the work completed by the FA, utilizing the relationships built with the various on-campus support units and maintaining professional development programs related to open education.

Speakers
EG

Emily Goldstein

Director of eLearning, University of Missouri - St. Louis
DK

Danielle King

University of Missouri - St. Louis


Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:20 - 14:50
BL27.06 ground floor classroom - Presentations

14:20

Open, future, online teaching: enabling excellence in the student experience
This mixed-methods study reports on a continuing professional development intervention (CPD), called #OpenTeach, designed to upskill part-team online teachers. CPD is recognised as crucial to the upskilling of educators to enhance the student learning experience. However, an important gap exists in the provision of CPD for part-time and online teachers who rarely have the opportunity to avail of campus-based resources (Beaton & Gilbert, 2013). To address this gap we need to better harness the potential of more flexible models of online education. Geographically dispersed online teachers require opportunities to engage with new learning designs, new digital competencies and new ways of embedding digital technology in teaching, learning and assessment. Accordingly, the #OpenTeach intervention addresses this challenge through a highly targeted CPD programme for part-time online teachers. The core of the initiative involves the development a short open online course on online teaching best practice. This course will develop the digital and pedagogical competencies of the 90 DCU Connected online teachers locally and will be open to online educators globally. The #OpenTeach: Professional Development for Open Online Educators project is funded by the Irish National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.

Speakers
OF

Orna Farrell

Dublin City University
avatar for James Brunton

James Brunton

Programme Chair/Director, Dublin City University
James has a BA (Hons) in Applied Psychology from University College Cork and a PhD in Social/Organisational Psychology from Dublin City University. Having previously worked as a lecturer and Programme Leader for two undergraduate Social Science Degrees in Dublin Business School's... Read More →
avatar for Eamon Costello

Eamon Costello

Head of Open Education, Dublin City University
GC

Grainne Conole

Dublin City University
ED

Enda Donlon

Dublin City University
ST

Samantha Trevaskis

Dublin City University


Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:20 - 14:50
BL27.05 ground floor classroom - Presentations

14:20

Open Policy for K-12 Public Textbooks
Open discussion to problematize the different challenges and components related to developing Open Policy for publicly-funded Textbooks for the K-12 Primary and Secondary educational sector. The attendee will recognize the procurement framework and the need for efficiency on heavy public spending on K-12 Textbooks, as well as, recognize the crucial elements for a public policy, with Openness in its core, that can shape a healthy and competitive public and private Textbook market, and the role and contribution of textbooks to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education (SDG 4).

Speakers
avatar for Werner Westermann

Werner Westermann

Civic Education Program, Coordinator, Library of National Congress
History, Geography and Civics teacher, kidnaped by open technologies and practices to amplify access and raise quality of learning and reaching. Open Education advocate for more than a decade, more enthusiastic/less academic OER researcher, CC IOL fellow pushing Open Educational Policy. On the way of building spanish-language Open Textbooks platform... Read More →


Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:20 - 14:50
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

14:25

The story of the MOOC that became OER
MOOCs have gained more and more attention from different stakeholders, with the purpose of enhancing the learning process and providing different ways to deliver educational contents.
Politecnico di Milano was the first Italian technical university to develop a MOOC platform, Polimi Open Knowledge (POK). The purpose of POK was to bridge the gaps, providing, for instance, contents to fill in the gap between high school and university. The platform was launched in August 2014 with two courses: Introduction to physics and PreCalculus.
In this work, we go through the five years long life of PreCalculus MOOC, the first Italian MOOC on Mathematics. In the beginning, the course was just copyright protected, because it was produced to provide an online course to recall and recap the essential mathematics for enrolling in a STEM program. At a certain point, the course has also been used within the design of a new hybrid preparatory course, devoted to first-year students at Politecnico di Milano. Then, the MOOC has become part of a research project, called “FlipMath”, aimed at introducing the flipped classroom methodology in high school math classrooms. Finally, the MOOC was used as part of the math course for the first-year students in Architecture at Politecnico di Milano.
It is worth noticing that the first idea that prompts to design and produce this MOOC has been transforming. Therefore, the copyright protection by itself became too restricted and did not fit anymore the actual use of this set of educational materials.
If we look at the evolution of the different MOOC uses, this process leads to rethink the opportunity of adopting a CC license, thus making the MOOC an OER in itself, as a whole, and a collection of OER, as a learning path built with different materials (videos, texts, exercises, etc).

Speakers
avatar for Domenico Brunetto

Domenico Brunetto

Politecnico di Milano


Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:25 - 14:35
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

14:55

#aboerjc: Open discussion of Open Educational Practices
Members of the ABOER (http://albertaoer.com/)community of practice (CoP) live throughout Alberta and represent the range of higher education institutions within the province. Without funding for this CoP, distributed methods to maintain the awareness, use, and advocacy of OER and open practices are necessary to sustain momentum generated from earlier one-time OER funding from the Alberta government. Thus, in the autumn of 2018, an Alberta based OER Community of Practice (CoP) organized a new interpretation of a journal club. Using the hashtag #aboerjc, the informal group married the concepts of a twitter chat with a journal club. Using the micro-blogging format, a Twitter chat has a facilitator synchronously send out questions that participants, following the dedicated and associated hashtags, then answer and expand upon.
November, 2018 launched #aboerjc and has since occurred monthly, on the first Tuesday at 7 pm MST. Each chat has highlighted an article from an open access journal, advertised in advance so #aboerjc participants can engage thoughtfully and critically with the tweeted questions.
Moving to a distributed model of facilitation, the organizers tried various methods to attract participants, both synchronously and in the long tail of retweets and likes post-twitter chat. Archives of the chats are posted on the #aboerjc website, a wordpress site (https://aboerjournalclub.home.blog/author/aboerjc/). Members behind #aboerjc will provide our processes, and preliminary findings including: the experiential differences between OER and OEP; challenges of applying open licensing frameworks to cultural knowledge; OER/OEP to foster engagement with students; and differences based on institutional limitations. Participants will leave with a blueprint for how to engage in online scholarly discussions, and how to sustain these conversations over time. They will also leave with an understanding of the challenges of using Twitter and its potential for supporting open boundaries and open opportunities for educational change.

Speakers
avatar for Constance Blomgren

Constance Blomgren

Assistant Professor, Athabasca University
Dr. Connie Blomgren is an Assistant Professor at Athabasca Univeristy where she has designed and implemented professional learning modules to further digital pedagogy ( Blended and Online Learning and Teaching). The BOLT blog hosts teacher commentaries regarding technology-enhanced... Read More →
avatar for Erik Christiansen

Erik Christiansen

Assistant Professor/Librarian, Mount Royal University
Erik G. Christiansen is an Assistant Professor/Librarian at Mount Royal University in Calgary, Alberta. His research interests include open pedagogy, open education resources policy, education technology, and web accessibility and usability for libraries. Previously, he worked as... Read More →


Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:55 - 15:05
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

14:55

A View of Personal Learning Paths in the Future of Lifelong and Lifewide Open Learning
With the technologies of open education such as open educational resources (OER) and massive open online courses (MOOCs), opportunities for non-formal and informal learning are ubiquitous and information/knowledge access is easy. Learning can occur haphazardly at many different places including schools, homes, communities, workplaces, and public places, but often times individuals lack awareness of or means of tracking their own learning when it comes to learning outside of formal schooling.
Ideally learning for an individual should be holistic, not separating different contexts and different periods of his/her life. Potentials for linking informal or non-formal learning to formal learning have become salient. However, the means to assess and visualize one’s own lifewide and lifelong learning paths organizing all those learning resources are rarely discussed. With the current tremendous power of cloud computing, digital storage and mobile devices, technologies afford us to keep all the personal learning records throughout our lives as well as across different contexts of our lives on our personal clouds. These technologies also give the possibility of integrating and visualizing all the disparate learning and recognizing it throughout one’s life. The proposed presentation discusses potentials of the technologies to assist actualizing the vision. One of those technologies is blockchain. Blockchain technologies promise decentralized management of academic and professional credentials independent of any particular institutions or organizations who issue those credentials. The implementations of such technologies in educational credentialing is still in its infant stage; however, the premise such technologies hold is rather profound as it could fundamentally change the characteristics of higher education organizations that exist today. The presentation will present a view of the future of open learning in which one can keep track of all the learning and choose to share the processes and the results of those learning as s/he wishes.

Speakers
avatar for Kumiko Aoki

Kumiko Aoki

Professor, The Open University of Japan


Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:55 - 15:25
BL27.06 ground floor classroom - Presentations

14:55

Enhancing OER Discovery with OASIS
As we began ramping up our OER efforts at SUNY Geneseo, we were directing faculty to a multitude of different sources to find materials that might be relevant for their courses, which was time-consuming and difficult. Rather than continuing this cumbersome and inefficient practice, we began exploring the idea of creating a search tool to make the discovery of open content easier for faculty at Geneseo, as well as the broader OER community. The result was the development of Openly Available Sources Integrated Search (OASIS).

OASIS currently searches open content from 80 sources and contains more than 325,000 records, most of which are in the public domain or openly licensed. Users can search using single words, multiple words, and “quoted phrase” strings, or users can begin their search by material type from the homepage. Searchable material types include textbooks, courses, course materials, interactive simulations, public domain books, audiobooks, modules, open access books, videos, podcasts, and learning objects. On the search results page, users can filter by material type, subject, source, reviewed resource, and Creative Commons license. There is also the option to suggest a source to be added to OASIS. Since it’s launch on September 5, 2018, OASIS has had more than 18,000 users from 93 different countries, and there are currently 421 institutions from across the globe that have linked to or added the OASIS search widget to their website. This presentation will share the iterative processes that we went through in creating OASIS, including the website framework, source selection, resource integration, and end-user experience. We will also discuss the future direction of OASIS, how it can be utilized at other organizations, as well as gather feedback from the OER community on how we can improve this tool.

Watch a video about this session!


Speakers
avatar for Ben Rawlins

Ben Rawlins

Library Director, SUNY Geneseo
Co-developer of OASIS
avatar for Bill Jones

Bill Jones

Digital Resources and Systems Librarian, SUNY Geneseo
Bill Jones is the Digital Resources and Systems Librarian at SUNY Geneseo Milne Library and the SUNYConnect Systems Librarian at the Office of Library and Information Services at SUNY System Administration.  Bill is the President of the State University of New York Librarians Association... Read More →



Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:55 - 15:25
BL27.05 ground floor classroom - Presentations

14:55

MOOCs: Exploring Motivation and Obstacles in a Developing Country
One of the innovations in education is the development of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). MOOCs provide an opportunity for everyone to study anywhere, anytime, and free. In addition to having various advantages, MOOCs also have various shortcomings or obstacles, especially in developing countries such as Indonesia. Universitas Terbuka (UT) is one of the universities in Indonesia that offers MOOCs. The main problem in MOOCs is the low level of completion rate, including in UT, which only reaches 14.95%. For this reason, we need to know what problems faced by participants and their expectations so MOOCs program can be managed better. This article is an exploratory study by collecting data through survey to UT’s MOOCs participants. The result shows that to get certificate and knowledge become the biggest motivation of participants. Another result shows that the biggest obstacle is participants don’t have enough time to participate actively in MOOCs. Some practical implications will be discussed in this paper to answer to reach the objective of this study.

Speakers
KR

Kurnia Riana

universitas terbuka
RH

Rini Hadiwidjaja

universitas terbuka
HM

Harsasi Meirani

universitas terbuka


Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:55 - 15:25
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

14:55

Data Activism as scholarly pursuit: nurturing open connections and collaboration against the domination of datafication in higher education.
Session Table Name: BOLZANO

Datafication is transforming the digital experience and spaces which were the base of social fabric. In spite of the positive discourses on this emergent phenomenon, the negative nuances require urgent awareness and action. Open Education and pedagogies could support data literacy as a driver of societal transformation towards the appropriation of the datafied public spaces. Therefore, HE, and mostly, public universities could play a key role in fostering critical approaches to knowledge production and the phenomenon of datafication in the society. In time, this would contribute to shape informed and transformative democratic practices and dialogue empowering citizens to address social justice concerns. However, this envisioned strategy requires faculty development and engagement. In Higher Education Institutions, fostering data literacies requires of disciplinary and pedagogical efforts to innovate in curricular design to design learning activities, using a research based learning approach. Despite the growing phenomenon of datafication at society and educational level, there is a lack of documentation on academic development in data literacies. There is a growing number of studies on teachers’ data literacy relating teachers’ skills to deal with school data, particularly to analyze the school performance and supporting school management, but a critical approach which enacts teachers and students to deal with data seems to be weakly represented in the literature. In this workshop, the authors open a discussion to think about “data activism” as a mean support faculty’s awareness and practices aimed at shaping critical and ethical approaches to data, in all its forms and usages, in education.

Speakers
avatar for Leo Havemann

Leo Havemann

Digital Education Advisor / Postgraduate Researcher, Open University / University College London
Please see my other profile here:https://oeglobal2019.sched.com/leohavemann
avatar for Juliana Elisa Raffaghelli

Juliana Elisa Raffaghelli

Researcher, Open University of Catalonia
https://www.linkedin.com/in/julianaraffaghelli/ https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Juliana_Elisa_Raffaghelli https://unifi.academia.edu/JulianaRaffaghelli
avatar for Javiera Atenas

Javiera Atenas

Research Lead, Open Education Policy Lab - OEGW


Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:55 - 16:00
BL27 first floor south corridor - Action Lab

14:55

Building a student network for OER advocacy
Session Table Name: BOLOGNA

Advocacy for Open Education often focuses on institutional practices, financial resources, or government policy: recognize authorship of Open Educational Resources (OERs) as a legitimate form of academic scholarship or fund a grant program to encourage adoption of OERs, require government publications to be openly licensed. In most cases, the ideas behind these efforts focus on students: expanding access for students by removing cost barriers or improving student learning by enacting open pedagogy. Nevertheless, advocacy for Open Education rarely involves students themselves. Our project in aims to change that. We are building a student network for OER advocacy across California higher education. During this session, we will describe how and why we started, the challenges and successes we encountered, and engage the audience in identifying how they can start a student network for OER advocacy.

Speakers
avatar for James Glapa-Grossklag

James Glapa-Grossklag

Dean, Educational Technology, Learning Resources, and Distance Learning, College of the Canyons
James Glapa-Grossklag is the Dean of Educational Technology, Learning Resources, and Distance Learning at College of the Canyons (California, USA). He directs the statewide CCC DECT grant and also co-coordinates Technical Assistance for the CCC Zero Textbook Cost grant program. James... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Illowsky

Barbara Illowsky

Chief Academic Affairs Officer, Michelson 20MM Foundation
Dr. Barbara Illowsky is Chief Academic Affairs Officer for the California Community Colleges Online Education Initiative. In addition, she has been a mathematics and statistics professor at De Anza College, Cupertino, CA since 1989. She is currently on the Board of Directors for the... Read More →
TR

Trudi Radtke

College of the Canyons


Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:55 - 16:00
BL27 first floor north corridor - Action Lab

14:55

Co-creating an Open Pedagogy Starter Kit
Session Table Name: GENOVA

There has been a growing interest in open educational practices (OEP) and open pedagogy (e.g., Creative Commons 2018; Cronin & MacLaren 2018; DeRosa and Robison 2017). In talking with faculty, students and staff about open pedagogy (OP), we have found that there is a need for practical resources with suggestions on how to engage in OP, the benefits and possible challenges and risks, how to support students and faculty in OP activities, etc. Several valuable resources already exist, such as the Open Pedagogy Notebook and the Rebus Guide to Making Open Textbooks with Students. An Open Pedagogy starter kit would complement these resources, providing even more detailed and practical guidance. The current draft of the Open Pedagogy starter kit has sections on: definitions and examples of OP, supporting students in open pedagogy (including considerations of student privacy and risk), supporting faculty in teaching using open pedagogy (including potential benefits and challenges for instructors), and strategies and considerations for designing open pedagogy activities and assignments (including assessment of student work in the open). At this OEGlobal Action Lab we will share the starter kit as it exists, inviting participants to work in groups to add or suggest changes to the kit, thus expanding and refining it with contributions from people working in diverse contexts with a goal of improving its relevance and usability.

References:
Creative Commons (2018). Open Pedagogy / Practices (Unit 5.4), Creative Commons Certificate for Educators and Librarians.
Cronin, C., & MacLaren, I. (2018). Conceptualising OEP: A review of theoretical and empirical literature in Open Educational Practices. Open Praxis, 10(2).
DeRosa, R., & Robison, S. (2017). From OER to open pedagogy: Harnessing the power of open. In R.S. Jhangiani & R. Biswas-Diener (Eds.), Open: The philosophy and practices that are revolutionizing education and science. London: Ubiquity Press.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Cangialosi

Karen Cangialosi

Professor of Biology & Open Education Faculty Fellow, Keene State College
I am a biologist who has used the principles of open pedagogy and student directed learning in my courses.
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching in Philosophy, Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technology, The University of British Columbia
Philosophy, OER, open textbooks, open pedagogy
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Associate Vice Provost, Open Education, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
avatar for Catherine Cronin

Catherine Cronin

Strategic Education Developer, National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education


Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:55 - 16:00
BL27 first floor south corridor - Action Lab

14:55

Decentralising education using Blockchain technology
Session Table Name: TORINO

The emergence of Blockchain technology promises to revolutionise not only the financial world, but also education in many different ways. Blockchain technology offers opportunities to thoroughly rethink how we find educational content and training services online, how we register and pay for them, as well as how we get accredited for what we have learned and how this accreditation affects our career trajectory. This session will explore the different aspects of open education and lifelong learning that are affected by this new paradigm. In particular, we will investigate the different scenarios where the use of Blockchain technology can make education more open and decentralised, while placing learners in control of their learning process and its associated data. We will outline the ways that accreditation, peer-tutoring, as well as other aspects of open education and lifelong learning can evolve within a decentralised education ecosystem based on the Blockchain. Finally, we will discuss the various benefits that this ecosystem bears both for learners and educators.

Speakers
avatar for Alexander Mikroyannidis

Alexander Mikroyannidis

The Open University
I have more than 10 years of research experience in the field of Technology-Enhanced Learning (TEL) and specifically in personalised learning, self-regulated learning, inquiry-based learning, open educational resources and rich interactive learning materials with applications in teaching... Read More →


Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:55 - 16:00
BL27 first floor north corridor - Action Lab

14:55

The Future is Here: Powering Lifelong Learning Architecture & Competency-based Education with Sustainable OER
Session Table Name: PALERMO

This Action lab is part workshop, part discussion, and part demonstration. Please bring laptops/tablets (not phones) to access sample materials, discuss and offer feedback! As OECD Edu2030 takes shape, we seek partners who can evolve the open content and become part of a secondary education consortium to share best practices and benefit from others' improvements. Materials will be shared at the session.

We need to change our relationship with both time and content in order to deliver truly 21st-century learning architecture. Nearly 20 years ago we began to question, dismantle, and then re-engineer multiple systems that better align with the modern flow of information, the neuroscience of learning, and the need for a global citizenry of lifelong learners. This Action Lab shares examples from 12 years of implementation of our Integrated Science Program across a wide array of demographics inside public, private and international secondary schools (ages 13-20) in the USA, Malaysia, Japan, Brazil and Mexico. We firmly believe that OER for secondary education must not be driven by digitized versions of 20th century textbook formats.

You will see in the materials and activities the ways we have expanded the definition of "open" educational resources:
  • Open content organization by breaking down disciplinary silos to create a interdisciplinary STE(A)M program that replaces formal science class
  • Openly connect the personal, local and global by using real-world issues & problems to drive content organization, including the incorporation of all 17 Sustainable Development Goals, while still meeting government and institutional course requirements
  • Transform passive, closed textbook content to active, open "texts that teach"
  • Open the roles of publisher, teachers & students, making them more collaborative and directly ensconced in the Information Age through a Sustainable OER model. We evolve ~15% of content annually and invite students to write & render ~30% of their ‘digital science textbook’
  • Open learning architecture by using a multi-year progression rather than single-year courses. Students build layers of ‘conceptual threads’ across multiple contexts explicitly and in a personalized manner. This mimics brain activity during adolescence, a developmental period of high neural connectivity
  • Open student assessment structures by linking individual performance tasks to common competencies, and by replacing a holistic task "grade" with several individual competency ratings. By connecting assessment over multiple tasks, units and years, students build personalized learning profiles over time (and also remove midterms and final exams in the process!)
  • Discard proprietary platforms in favor of those used commonly in schools (Google Classroom, Microsoft Education), which maintain long-term, truly inclusive, open access to evolving productivity integrations, creativity add-ons and assistive technology tools. Schools can pilot emerging technologies without dismantling the structures of the learning progressions. 
  • Open students to a wide array of genres in authentic STEM, far beyond the digital textbook. We build on disciplinary literacy research to apprentice students.



Speakers
avatar for Catherine Saldutti

Catherine Saldutti

President & Founder, EduChange, Inc.
Catherine Saldutti has over 26 years of experience in secondary education, and has served as a teacher, administrator, professional development provider, program evaluator, and instructional designer. She founded EduChange in 2000 to fundamentally reimagine and redesign the systems... Read More →



Tuesday November 26, 2019 14:55 - 16:00
BL27 first floor north corridor - Action Lab

15:05

Why flipping the class does not always work?
Here (https://youtu.be/v-3cZcSBsIw) you can see the video that we prepare for you!

During the fall semesters of last two academic years, a MOOC Técnico course was used to support a flipped-classroom strategy, which involved circa 180 on-campus first-year students enrolled in a regular Linear Algebra (LA) course at Instituto Superior Técnico (IST), Universidade de Lisboa.

This innovative experience in IST campus was designed, implemented and monitored in collaboration with MOOC Técnico pedagogical team, and even with overall positive results, encounter several constrains. The goal of the present talk is to discuss some working strategies that we were able to implement successfully, and also to receive possible feedback from the audience. Over the two-year implementation we clearly identified the following four types of obstacles to the flipping of the class: institutional resistance, course and content restrictions, situational constrains and students’ psychological factors.

The first resistance to overcome consisted in having the department’s support to go outside the general norm of lecturing. The LA teacher was facing review and criticism by others within the department which is not the usual rule. Then the choice of the given topic of the LA curriculum obliged us to review certain principles. The physical space in which the lecture classes were supposed to take place all along the semester was not suitable for discussions and collaborative peer-work. We also found students’ psychological factors to overcome, from accommodation to passive classroom to inexperience how to collaborate and create a sense of an open community within the MOOC.

Speakers
avatar for Ana Moura Santos

Ana Moura Santos

MOOC Técnico Coordinator, Universidade de Lisboa
Besides my research on Operator Theory and Functional Analysis, I author many online educational resources (OER) in particular more than two hundred assessment exercises with random parameters for Linear Algebra, Vector Calculus and Random Matrices, and several demonstrations at Wolfram... Read More →
AG

Alexandra Gomes

Universidade de Lisboa



Tuesday November 26, 2019 15:05 - 15:15
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

15:15

Open Education Resources for Augmented Reality Education (OER4ARE)
Publicly accessible education materials allow teachers and learners to enrich their topics with all sorts of relevant content. It is understandable that early examples of Open Education Resources (OER) mainly consist of texts, images and video, because those are the prominent media that are easily shareable through online platforms. However, if we consider pre-digital learning materials, the academic repositories are much more diverse with a key role for artifacts. Academic object collections have always been of great value in making content imaginable in education. Besides books in libraries we can find collections of for example
plants in a botanical garden, pictures in a pinacotheca, sculptures in a glyptotheque, and the like. With new digital techniques some of these academic collections can be digitized into 3D models that can be openly shared in online repositories so others can reuse and remix them.

We envision a near future in which 3D models will become prominent resources in many fields of education. This relates to the current major developments in spatial computing with Virtual Reality (VR) as the iconic new viewing technology and Augmented Reality (AR) as the most promising spatial technology for open online education. AR education situates the learners by surrounding them with learning materials that are visually and audibly superimposed on the real world. In this way learners can relate real-life context with AR models while involving their own physical perspective and bodily activity in the learning activity.

During a two-year teaching fellowship at the TU Delft teaching lab, and in a series of AR/VR incubator workshops we are prototyping and testing diverse AR education situations. We developed and shared our own OER4ARE models and reused and remixed existing models. In this session we will present use cases of online 3D model repositories and best practices for the OER4ARE workflow.

Speakers
avatar for Martijn Stellingwerff

Martijn Stellingwerff

TU-Delft, Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment
avatar for Johannetta Gordijn

Johannetta Gordijn

TU-Delft, University Corporate Office, Education en Student Affairs
MT

Michael Tjia

TU-Delft, Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment


Tuesday November 26, 2019 15:15 - 15:25
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

15:25

The missed step: Preparing our students to learn from OER
​As we shift from print-based publisher materials to largely digital OER materials, there is a step we missed - preparing our students to use these materials. In high school, many students had access to print based texts but were not even able to bring these print books home to study. Now in college, students have early and long term access to digital materials that are OER - but do they know how to use them? Do they know how to take notes in a digital book? From a website? Do they know how to actively learn from a video?

Participants in this session will be provided with strategies on how to help our students actively learn from and engage with the array of instructional media that OER are available in. Additionally, a resource site will be available to participants.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Young

Lisa Young

Faculty Director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Scottsdale Community College
I serve Scottsdale Community College as the Instructional Design and Educational Technology faculty member. I am passionate about helping our students learn whether it be through excellent instructional design, the use of educational technology to resolve and mitigate instructional... Read More →


Tuesday November 26, 2019 15:25 - 15:35
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

15:30

UNVEILING THE RELATION BETWEEN THE USE OF OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES AND THE ADOPTION OF OPEN TEACHING PRACTICES IN UNIVERSITIES
The paper aims to advance the understanding of the way university educators currently adopt Open Educational Practices (OEP), by analysing the relation between the use of Open Educational Resources (OER) and the implementation of open teaching practices. The paper results are based on the data collected through the Open Educators Factory platform among 921 university educators from around the globe. Depending on their actual use of OER and open teaching practices, we have categorized the teachers who have responded to the survey along a scale that goes from “novice” to “experts”, and we have then crossed the data about use of OER and adoption of open teaching practices, looking for a positive influence relation between the two phenomena. The main finding of the paper, which is in line with the latest research developments on Open Education, is that a strong relation exists: the more an educator uses OER, the more he will probably adopt open teaching practices, and viceversa. These results are critically discussed with a view to use this existing virtuous circle between use of open content and adoption of open teaching as a way to build generalised open education capacity among universities’ teaching staff.

Speakers
avatar for Fabio Nascimbeni

Fabio Nascimbeni

Assistant Professor, Universidad Internacional de La Rioja
I work as assistant professor in the Universidad Internacional de La Rioja (UNIR), and I am a senior fellow of of the European Distance and eLearning Network (EDEN) and a fellow of the Centro de Estudos Sociedade e Tecnologia of the University of Sao Paulo (Brazil) and of the Nexa... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Burgos

Daniel Burgos

Director Research Institute UNIR iTED, Universidad Internacional de la Rioja (UNIR)
Prof. Dr. Daniel Burgos works as Vice-rector for Knowledge Transfer & Technology (http://transfer.unir.net), UNESCO Chair on eLearning and ICDE Chair in OER (http://research.unir.net/unesco) at Universidad Internacional de La Rioja (UNIR, http://www.unir.net). He is also Director... Read More →


Tuesday November 26, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
BL27.05 ground floor classroom - Presentations

15:30

ENSURING OERS AND MOOC QUALITY IN AN OPEN VIRTUAL MOBILITY MOOC
In the present paper, the quality assurance framework for OERs and MOOCs in the Erasmus + project “openVM: Opening Education for Developing, Assessing and Recognising Virtual Mobility Skills in Higher Education” is presented. The openVM project aims to support higher education teachers and students in developing, assessing and recognising the skills needed for design, implement and participate in virtual mobility activities in line with Open Education principles. The Quality Assurance Framework is one of the fundamental aspects for the success of the Open Virtual Mobility. Different approaches were combined to ensure the quality of the OpenVM MOOC and OpenVM OERs. The quality assurance of the OpenVM MOOC is addressed through an iterative cycle of design, creation, implementation, and assessment, following the Design-Based Research model (Barab & Squire, 2004). The quality assurance of the OpenVM OERs was addressed by combining elements of the traditional peer-review with social rating. Three main macro-indicators have been identified for the OERs evaluation to assess OER to be included in the Open VM MOOC: 1 Quality 2. Appropriateness and 3. Technical aspects. Each partner was invited to search, select and peer-assess OERs related to the eight skills necessary to be engaged in VM experiences, as stated in the state of the art of the project (IO1). Primary results of the peer-review are presented. Eventually, future directions to ensure the OERs and OpenVM MOOC quality are described.

Speakers
avatar for Antonella Poce

Antonella Poce

University of Roma Tre
FA

Francesca Amenduni

University of Roma Tre
MR

Maria Rosaria Re

University of Roma Tre
MV

Mara Valente

University of Roma Tre


Tuesday November 26, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
BL27.06 ground floor classroom - Presentations

15:30

OER translation and its use in K-12 field in Japan
OCW project up to twenty universities joined the community of OCW in Japan, which has been conducted by JOCW, Japan OCW Consortium. All of those activities from member universities were focused on distribution of OCW content from each university. After 2008 or 2009 member universities and their newly distributed courses has been decreased gradually. Recently some universities still remain in JOCW and they are continuing distribution of courses as OCW. As mentioned above most of all activities related Open Education were focused on distribution courses from Japanese universities. In 2015 Asuka Academy has been established as NPO to redistribute quality OER from the world famous universities after translation to Japanese. First step of the organization was recruitment of good translators to give their special skill as volunteers. We selected the first course to make translation from MIT OCW, most visited courses at that time. OCW courses are very high quality in terms of depth and length, but they seems to be something inaccessible especially for younger generation like under eighteen. So Asuka Academy added the OER contents for younger generation for example MIT-K12 contents, AFP WAA(World Academic Archive) and short clips from Open University of United Kingdom. Those contents could be good candidates not only for learning but also for translation. Actually some high schools joined the translation community and made translation as informal project in the schools. They found the course translation had various aspect of learning, not only understanding of subject but also language learning and social learning to give social contribution as enlargement of learning opportunity.

Current status of Asuka Academy is as below;
Translated courses: 103 courses, Total enrollments: 31,000, Registered learners: 8,700, Total translators: 1,500.

Speakers
YF

Yoshimi Fukuhara

Asuka Academy
TK

Toru Kishida

Vice President, Asuka Academy
HN

Hisaya Nakamura

Asuka Academy
MA

Masuyo Ando

Asuka Academy


Tuesday November 26, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

15:35

From OER to Open Pedagogy: Cultivating a Culture of Open
In this session, we will share our experience building a culture of open that encompasses OER, open pedagogy, and open teaching. Since 2015, Borough of Manhattan Community College’s program has evolved from an OER seminar to a multi-faceted initiative including OER advocates, teaching in the open, and Open Teaching Week, an annual event showcasing the campus's open ecosystem and faculty and students engaging in this space. Presenters will discuss the evolution of our college’s OER and open teaching initiatives.

Speakers
AF

Ann Fiddler

Open Education Librarian, City University of New York, CUNY
avatar for Jean Amaral

Jean Amaral

Open Knowledge Librarian, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY
GC

Gina Cherry

Director of Borough of Manhattan Community College Center for Excellence in Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship (CETLS), Borough of Manhattan Community College , CUNY


Tuesday November 26, 2019 15:35 - 15:45
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

16:00

Coffee/Tea Break
Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:00 - 16:15
Break Area

16:15

An international open pedagogy fellowship in support of the UN sustainable development goals
Open pedagogy may be understood as an access-oriented commitment to learner-driven education. It is a process of using tools for learning and designing architectures for learning that enable students to shape the public knowledge commons of which they are a part (DeRosa & Jhangiani, 2018). One particular form of open pedagogy that is growing in popularity is known as a renewable assignment. Renewable assignments (also known as non-disposable assignments) involve students creating resources as part of their coursework that add value to the world, live beyond of the boundaries and beyond the duration of the course, and are likely to have a lasting impact (e.g., Seraphin et al., 2019). This often involves students creating, adapting, updating, curating, or annotating open educational resources (OER).

Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU) in British Columbia, Canada and Montgomery College (MC) in Maryland, USA have launched a joint Open Pedagogy Fellowship focused on the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The fellowship involves selected faculty across the two institutions working collaboratively across boundaries and academic disciplines to design renewable assignments that serve progress towards specific SDGs. The renewable assignments designed are being deployed in courses taught by the participating faculty over the the 2019-20 academic year to help students at both institutions become agents of change in their own communities. This presentation will share the goals and mechanics of this international partnership along with brief examples of the assignments designed by the inaugural cohort, which includes three teams of faculty from: 1) Urban Ecosystems, Sustainable Horticulture, and Anthropology, 2) Marketing, Educational Studies, and Math, and 3) English and Math. The benefits and challenges of this project will be shared, along with a few lessons learned and the next steps for this fellowship program.

Speakers
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Associate Vice Provost, Open Education, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
avatar for Michael Mills

Michael Mills

Vice President, Montgomery College
avatar for Shinta Hernandez

Shinta Hernandez

Department Chair, Montgomery College


Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:15 - 16:25
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

16:15

Impact of OER MOOC on academic teaching practice in Poland
In this presentation authors will share experience from MOOC on OER organised and carried out for academic teachers and PhD students in Poland during Open Education Week in March 2019. The course was designed as 5 days challenge - each day participants were guided through basic information about benefits and drawbacks of OER and CC licenses to more advanced aspects such as remixing open resources and creating their own materials. It was the 3 edition of the course led by Centre of e-Learning AGH, but the first opened for the whole Polish academic community. The first two editions were conducted locally at AGH in order to pilot the approach and make required amendments.

Short formula, online mode, no participation fee and the OER subject could have been a reason of 102 participants registered for the course overall. 51% of participants has completed the course and received a certificate of completion.

The first, introductory part of the presentation, will briefly show the main assumption of the course, focusing on the course design, the structure, types of activities, tools selected for enhancing learning and a role of facilitators. The second, main part of the talk, will concentrate on findings from the quantitative research - results of several interviews with MOOC participants on their experiences and impact of the course on their daily teaching practice. The interviews will be launched in middle May. The authors are interested in teachers observation on the course design but the main part of research will be focused on the extent of shift in teaching practice that was made in result of the course.

Based on the findings from interviews, authors will present the possible solutions for the course improvement and try to draw a picture of academic teachers usage of Open Educational Resources in their teaching activities.

Speakers
KG

Karolina Grodecka

AGH University of Science and Technology
JK

Jan Kusiak

AGH University of Science and Technology


Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:15 - 16:45
BL27.05 ground floor classroom - Presentations

16:15

LibreTexts: A Community Platform for OER
The LibreTexts community focuses on creating and curating on line libraries that are easy for others to reuse, revise, remix and redistribute, fulfilling the 5R dream. LibreTexts’ technology enables any faculty member to easily and rapidly create OER textbooks and more, optimized for their courses and students. The structure of LibreTexts solves two of the central problems limiting OER adoption: the time and expertise that faculty need to assemble OER for their classes and dissemination to others. Libretexts are built by incorporating content from an extensive (largest on the net and growing) network of textbooks extending across higher education that faculty can edit and enhance to meet their needs. Since inception eleven years ago as the ChemWIKI, LibreTexts has been exponentially growing and currently reaches tens of millions of students per year. LibreTexts effectively fulfills the ALMS framework. All faculty have ACCESS to a suite of WYSIWYG HTML5 editing tools. The LEVEL of expertise needed is low. Drag and drop ReMixing can be done across the libraries so that texts which incorporate multiple areas can be created. All LibreTexts can be MEANINGFULLY edited and both the text and the source code are always available. All material is SELF SOURCED. HTML5 is used both for display and for revising and remixing. LibreTexts are easy to adopt and use, simple to optimize, and backed by educational research with advanced technologies. Features incorporate annotation (hypothes.is), computation (Jupyter), 3D visualization and multimedia. LibreTexts supports import into LMSs and print on demand. Printed textbooks are available from at low cost. The WebWork homework system is being implemented. Research projects are underway to determine how students interact with online textbooks and optimize LibreTexts. Technology to provide LibreTexts in-a-box, based on the Raspberry Pi, for remote locations is being developed.

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Halpern

Joshua Halpern

Outreach Team Chair, LibreTexts
Josh Halpern is the Outreach Team Chair at the LibreTexts Project and is interested in discussions about how LibreTexts can support OER globally. LibreTexts is not only one of the largest OER textbook repositories but also provides tools foreasy and quick customization of books... Read More →
DL

Delmar Larsen

University of California, Davis


Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:15 - 16:45
BL27.06 ground floor classroom - Presentations

16:15

Providing open opportunities for access to higher education to refugees through an open education initiative: A Case Study of Dublin City University’s University of Sanctuary Scholarship programme
The displacement crisis is one of the biggest global challenges of our time, with nearly 70 million people driven from their homes, mostly by conflict. Linking to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal 4, Quality Education, there is a collective responsibility to ensure that educational systems adapt to the needs of refugees to ensure this vulnerable group is visible and accounted for in educational provision.

In 2016 Dublin City University (DCU) was granted University of Sanctuary status and, to date, 23 refugees and asylum seekers have been granted scholarships. This paper examines the experiences of seven scholarship recipients in their first year of study on DCU Connected online programmes. Qualitative data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analysed using thematic analysis in order to explore the experiences of these students and gain insights to support their transition, and the transition of future cohorts, into higher education. This is important in order to empower these students to have positive learning experiences such that they are led towards successful completion.

Findings indicate that participants feel a strong sense of belonging to the University, in opposition to their lives as asylum seekers or refugees. They identified ‘two separate worlds’; the ‘study world’, to which they belonged and the ‘asylum world’; a place they did not want to be. While participants were highly motivated, this was impacted by practical considerations such as finances, access to laptops, broadband, and bank accounts, and logistics of child care and travelling to the university. Participants relied on university supports, principally the team relating to their programme, and on peer support in order to facilitate progress through their studies.

The findings provide insights into how higher education institutions can develop effective policy, practices, and procedures to assist refugees integrating into higher education in order to facilitate successful completion.

Speakers
avatar for James Brunton

James Brunton

Programme Chair/Director, Dublin City University
James has a BA (Hons) in Applied Psychology from University College Cork and a PhD in Social/Organisational Psychology from Dublin City University. Having previously worked as a lecturer and Programme Leader for two undergraduate Social Science Degrees in Dublin Business School's... Read More →
OF

Orna Farrell

Dublin City University
LD

Lorraine Delaney

Dublin City University
avatar for Mark Brown

Mark Brown

Professor of Digital Learning, Dublin City University
Mark is Ireland’s first Professor of Digital Learning and Director of the National Institute for Digital Learning (NIDL) at Dublin City University (DCU). He originally began his educational career as a primary teacher and now has over 25 years experience of working in Higher Education... Read More →
avatar for Eamon Costello

Eamon Costello

Head of Open Education, Dublin City University
CF

Colum Foley

Dublin City University


Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:15 - 16:45
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

16:15

Action Lab on Open Education Policy Making
Session Table Name: BOLZANO

The objective of the Action Lab is to discuss how to advance Open Education and OER policy making in different national and international contexts.

The Action Lab will start with a brief presentation of the results of the OER Policy Forum (planned for October 2019 in Warsaw) and will then be structured around discussion on the following questions: what are the needed elements for a successful Open Education policy? How can Open Education coalitions successfully advocate for Open Education policies? What are the main challenges that these coalitions are facing? How can these challenges be solved by increasing International collaboration?

Expected participants are members of Open Education coalitions from Brazil, Czech Republic, Ireland, Italy, Poland, Romania, Scotland, US.

Speakers
avatar for Fabio Nascimbeni

Fabio Nascimbeni

Assistant Professor, Universidad Internacional de La Rioja
I work as assistant professor in the Universidad Internacional de La Rioja (UNIR), and I am a senior fellow of of the European Distance and eLearning Network (EDEN) and a fellow of the Centro de Estudos Sociedade e Tecnologia of the University of Sao Paulo (Brazil) and of the Nexa... Read More →
AT

Alek Tarkowski

Centrum Cyfrowe


Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:15 - 17:20
BL27 first floor south corridor - Action Lab

16:15

Communicating "Open"
Effective communication is an important tool for any advocate’s toolbox — whether that’s knowing how to ask a politician to support OER legislation, convincing an institutional leader to fund an initiative, or effectively rebutting the case of someone who opposes OER.

Whether you are a seasoned advocate or a newcomer to the movement, communicating about OER can be challenging. People do not always see the value of OER immediately, and the idea of “open” can be complex and difficult for some people to grasp.

The action lab will offer a crash course on basic advocacy communications, providing advice and examples to help OER advocates sharpen their communications skills.

Speakers

Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:15 - 17:20
BL27 first floor south corridor - Action Lab

16:15

Designing for the Invisible Learners in Open Educational Social Spaces
Session Table Name: BOLOGNA

This session will discuss invisible learners and possible design adjustments to be more inclusive of all learners within open education. Although Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) were originally thought to be an educational solution to the prevalence of marginalised voices, research is showing that not all learners are being reached. “Invisible learners” are described by Veletsianos (2015) as the learners that do not fit the common mold in MOOCs. Learners are predominantly male and affluent who “…exhibit self-regulated learning, have flexible work-life schedules, possess digital literacies, and are proficient in English (Glass et al., 2016, p. 45)”, not the anticipated “borderless, gender-blind, race-blind, class-blind, and bank account-blind” (Agarwal, 2013, para. 3) crowd some had hoped for. “MOOCs now tend to supplement classroom learning (e.g., four of five MIT undergraduates have taken a course on MITx) or serve as professional development opportunities for already privileged working professionals (Seaton et al., 2014; Glass, Shiokawa-Baklan, Saltarelli, 2016).” MOOCs further ignore their original intended audience. This can happen simply by forgetting about a portion of the audience during the design of the learning experience. “To expand access, institutions must disaggregate data on student achievement and completion by SES (e.g., zip code) to measure the effectiveness of MOOCs in educating students from underserved communities (Glass, Shiokawa-Baklan, Saltarelli, 2016).”

Speakers
avatar for Naomi Wahls

Naomi Wahls

Learning Developer, Delft University of Technology


Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:15 - 17:20
BL27 first floor north corridor - Action Lab

16:15

Open Commons-Oriented Courses: Teaching Across Borders and Hierarchies
Session Table Name: TORINO

In this action lab, participants will engage in a proven group process to identify barriers and possible solutions for enabling open courses that link classes in different colleges and universities with each other and with museums, libraries, and galleries across borders and organizational boundaries. The goal is to identify and remove the barriers to creating Open Commons-Oriented Courses.

The web is a two-edged sword for open education. Technology has enabled us to distribute OER’s at scale and produce MOOC’s. While expanding the scale and use of OER across borders and across institutions and organizations, these same technologies have also tended to centralize and concentrate influence in an already powerful center or global north. The emphasis on scale brings an increased commodification of education and an emphasis on content over pedagogy and materials over learning activities. Centralization also brings a deepening of the division between producer/teacher and reader/student. The course is defined by a center of power and distributed to large numbers of participants, at times exacerbating global inequities.

Yet higher education thrives in a commons. It always has. It is better suited to scope and network structures. That is why universities are structured as they are - a polycentric, nested, and connected series of departments or small commons. Commons doesn’t scale easily. A commons functions best in small groups with personal communication.

The same web that has made MOOC’s and mass OER possible has also boosted networking and facilitated small group social interactions at distance. Critical pedagogy and open pedagogies thrive in clusters of small-scale classes. These classes could now span borders and boundaries.

We believe a thriving network of commons-oriented courses that link students from different schools with each other and with other institutions is possible if we collectively identify the barriers and creative solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Jim Luke

Jim Luke

Prof. Economics / Open Learning Lab, Lansing Community College
Known as Econproph on the webs. I'm Professor of Economics & Open Learning Faculty Fellow in the Center for Teaching Excellence at Lansing Community College. I write about open and the economics of higher education and the commons - see my blog at econproph.com. Inventor & innovator... Read More →
avatar for Tannis Morgan

Tannis Morgan

Advisor, Teaching & Learning and Researcher, Open Education Practices, BCCampus



Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:15 - 17:20
BL27 first floor north corridor - Action Lab

16:15

“Cultural Heritage and Current Issues”. An Educational Practice of Architectural Design Degree
Session Table Name: GENOVA

In the Bachelor of Science course “Architectural Design” of the School AUIC of the Politecnico of Milan, the professors who teach in “Historical Building Preservation Studio”, have developed with METID an educational project that could be shared as “open educational practice”. The aim of the project is to bring students closer to current issues about Cultural Heritage.
The first step of educational practice is to attend a flipped classroom, where the student listen to some speeches by experts in the field of cultural heritage. Individual listening of the flipped classroom with reading recommended readings are the basis for the elaboration of a concept map. The second step is to communicate in classroom the topical issues, analysed critically and autonomously through concept maps. The concept maps represents the basis for discussion in small groups in the classroom with the supervision of the professors. During the discussion, the students exchange their concept map and comment on them highlighting aspects that could be explored. The third step is to complete and develop own concept map and to connect the discussed topics to the architectural issues about the case study of the Studio.
The originality of the practice is to allow to the students to listen some non-academic points of view about current issues “beyond the walls of the classroom”.
The relevance of this educational practice is the possibility to replicate it in other contexts (as well far from the Architecture) which include laboratory/workshop/studio activities.
The takeaways of this experience, that the other participants could replicate are: the framework of educational practice involving experts from outside the teaching groups; the way in which the contents are delivered (flipped classroom); the choice of the concept maps as tool to guide the individual organization of key information; the discussion in classroom in small groups.

Speakers
avatar for Francesca Albani

Francesca Albani

professor, Department of Architecture and Urban Studies - Politecnico di Milano
I teach in “Historical Building Preservation Studio” in the Bachelor course “Architectural Design” of the School of Architecture Urban Planning Construction Engineering of the Politecnico di Milano. Author of a high-impact innovative teaching action (450 students and 22 teachers... Read More →



Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:15 - 17:20
BL27 first floor south corridor - Action Lab

16:25

The Evolution of Open Education as it Parallels to the Open Education Consortium
Looking at an organization’s historical footprint can often indicate future trends. Are you strategic when you develop a vision or are you reactive? In this session, I will share how the Open Education Consortium (OEC) used insights resulting from our historical perspective, research from the growth, and expansion of the OEC to strategize, not only to share the organization for the future but potentially for open education.

Evolution of OEG throughout the years
In 2018, OEC celebrated its 10th anniversary. During the milestone year, OEC spent time looking at the 10 years as it related to growth, membership, and vision. For example, in 2008, the primary focus was on open courses, hence the name OpenCourseWare Consortium. In 2018, not only has the focus totally changed, the name changed to Open Education Consortium. The focus has not only expanded to include many other forms of open education such as open textbooks, open pedagogy, open access, and open source software, etc.; the focus has also shifted to less about open courses to more about collaboration.

Results and participation
During OEC’s anniversary year, an opinion survey gathered feedback on three areas that most affected open education during the past 10 years: 1 – the greatest trends; 2 – significant events; and 3 - inspirational influencers that shaped the understanding of open education in the past 10 years.

Invitation to participate
The historical footprint, the opinion survey, and a member needs-assessment were collectively used to create a list of ten specific items that we believe will affect the future of open education and OEC. I will share a visual creating an organizational roadmap leading to the top 10 plans for the future and offer an invitation to participate.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Huggins

Susan Huggins

Communications Director, Open Education Consortium
avatar for Mario Badilla

Mario Badilla

Open Education Consortium


Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:25 - 16:35
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

16:35

Can't draw? You can still create and edit OER images!
One struggle faced when adopting and adapting open educational resources for use in some courses is a lack of suitable images. Traditional publishers provide a repository of images, typically with easily editable leader lines and labels, that accompany the ancillary teaching materials. These images are especially useful in the STEM disciplines.

Traditional image editing software can be expensive; often requiring a long-term subscription. The software may also not be user-friendly, requiring extensive training to learn how to use them. For instructors who are not artists or graphic designers, losing publisher-provided images can be a major deterrent to adopting OER.

In this session, I will demonstrate how to use a user-friendly, relatively cheap app on a tablet to edit openly licensed images and pictures. The talk will focus on using the Procreate app on an iPad Pro since these are the tools most familiar to the presenter, however, the ultimate goal of the talk is to empower attendees, especially those lacking artistic abilities and computer-editing software skills, to search for ways to edit and create images using intuitive, low cost tools and resources. Examples of how the presenter uses the app include creating line drawings of images and pictures, erasing labels, and combining images.

Speakers
LR

Lauren Roberts

Biology Faculty, South Mountain Community College


Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:35 - 16:45
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

16:45

Creating an OER Module for Teaching Foreign Languages
Watch a short ex-ante (introductory) video about my session here.

This lightning talk focuses on bringing the Open Educational Resources (OER) into a foreign language classroom at varying levels of proficiency. I will demonstrate my OER dedicated to teaching Russian through poetry by using the most celebrated Russian poems as an example http://russianpoetry.yale.edu/ This project is completely open and easily adaptable to other foreign languages, and it can be used at a variety of academic settings, from traditional classroom setting, to a blended classroom, to an E-learning environment. This OER was developed with a support grant from Yale Center for Language Study and it was nominated for a national award for Best Contribution to Language Pedagogy by the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages (AATSEEL). My talk will demonstrate the OER and discuss the rationale for incorporating authentic literary materials in to a foreign-language classroom and its impact on developing learners’ intercultural competence and learning outcomes. It will also describe some learning activities at various levels of language proficiency and learners’ reactions to the project.https://drive.google.com/file/d/1hCv9CJ_BqPo7CJYVSRBs3GfvT3qvnxg0/view?usp=sharing

Speakers
avatar for Julia Titus

Julia Titus

Yale University


Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:45 - 16:55
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

16:50

The Impact of the Digital School Open Educational Resources and Practices (OERs/OEPs) on mainstream EFL in Greece
The paper draws on National Educational Initiatives to promote open and flexible learning through ICT, in particular the impact of the Hellenic Digital School Open Educational Resources and Practices (OERs/OEPs) on English as a Foreign language (EFL) teaching and learning in Greek public schools. Although OERs reside in the foundational pillar of educational policies for equitable access to high quality learning, educators’ responsiveness to OERs has not been widely researched neither have the outcomes of open education intervention schemes been consistently monitored and assessed (UNESCO & COL, 2016). The survey study was conducted amongst 198 public school EFL teachers using a questionnaire. Findings suggest that teachers’ awareness and perceptions of OERs were well above average but their levels of familiarity and engagement with OEPs were moderately low. Only the OERs embedded in the Open Interactive Textbooks were systematically applied by half of the respondents supplementing the preparation and the presentation of their lessons. Also, with the exception of revising (mainly adapting), there was low scale of reporting as concerns the sharing, repurposing and redistribution of resources between educators, thus defeating the purpose of building communities of practice around OERs. The research contributes to the sustainability open education action plan agendas.



Speakers
avatar for Angeliki Lada

Angeliki Lada

Associate student teacher educator, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens Faculty of English Studies
I have been involved in the design and implementation of Open Educational Resourses in the realms of the Hellenic National action plan for the digitation of primary and secondary education in public schools since 2010. My presentaton focusses on their impact on language teaching and... Read More →



Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:50 - 17:20
BL27.06 ground floor classroom - Presentations

16:50

Teaching through students’ involvement into creation, studying and mentoring MOOCs: the experience of Tomsk State University
Tomsk State University develops research and implementation of advanced learning technologies, among which an important place is taken by massive open online courses. TSU is opened to share its experience. Because of this reason the University has run the program of expert support for those who want to implement MOOCs.
The successful educational practice, which involves MOOCs, is represented by 3 cases:
• Studying through participation in online course creation,
• Flipped classroom practice,
• Creation MOOC mentors volunteer community of students.
Creation of the community of mentors involves more people into online learning. Involving students into the process of MOOC creation as well as blended learning help them not only gain basic knowledge, but also soft skills and makes educational process more practical.
The TSU MOOC team is ready to share the cases in details and suggest all the possible ways of cooperation with an aim to make e-learning more efficient.

Speakers
avatar for Galina Mozhaeva

Galina Mozhaeva

Director of the Institute of Distance Education, Tomsk State University
Галина Можаева, директор Института дистанционного образования Томский государственный университет 
VD

Victor Dyomin

Tomsk State University
DM

Daria Maslova

Tomsk State University


Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:50 - 17:20
BL27.05 ground floor classroom - Presentations

16:50

Co-designing the future creative professional: open and digital educational tools
The paper outlines a process of co-design of curricula for digital competences, to cover the skills gap of the Fashion Industry. We draw on DigiMooD, a European project which involve actors from the academic world, sector association, e-skills experts and a cultural and creative organization. The aim of the consortium is to develop and test the offer of a set of innovative and interdisciplinary educational modules in “Digital Entrepreneurship for the Creative Industries”, with a specific application to the Fashion Industry, its companies’ branding and narrative strategies and the digital service models.
In particular, the on-going research, brought together stakeholders coming from different context to co-create a cross-cutting curricula. Companies and start-ups from the Fashion sector have been involved in the process to ensure a connection with the needs of the Fashion industry. While the labor market change due to the digital, new job profile are needed by the industry to face the technological progress. Often these new professionals are required to be equipped with a mix of new competences, hence HEIs are requested to elaborate and deliver new curricula, both in terms of contents to be updated with the currents needs, and modes of learning to be versatile for students and professionals which would like to upskills their competences. Thus, DigiMooD consider digital transformation not only as a topic to be explored in the educational modules as well as a process which is transforming learning enabling new modes of didactic interaction between faculty and students, by developing the educational modules through MOOCs.
The paper will illustrate the process of the DigiMooD research highlighting how co-design activities supported the creation of the educational modules. In particular are presented the results of the activities developed with sectorial organization and the toolkits which enable the co-creation of open and digital cross-cutting curricula.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Taverna

Andrea Taverna

Research Fellow, Politecnico di Milano
MM

Marzia Mortati

Politecnico di Milano
PB

Paola Bertola

Politecnico di Milano


Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:50 - 17:20
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

16:55

TOMSK INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE PROGRAM: BREAKING FREE FROM TRADITIONAL DESIGN MODELS
In 2019/2020 the Interdisciplinary International Bachelor Program Tomsk International Science Program (TISP) will start following the decision to strengthen the international outlook of Tomsk State University within the field of natural sciences on the global market. The TISP is a unique program developed in collaboration with Maastricht University, the Netherlands, aimed at training of a new generation of top specialists with interdisciplinary knowledge to meet the huge challenges we face now and in the future. The program is based on the widely accepted among world leading universities model of Liberal Arts&Sciences, is taught in English and has special admission requirements.
This program is designed on the concept of curriculum internationalization, which is correlates with the philosophy of the open education: everyone in the world should have access to high-quality educational experiences and resources, and they work to eliminate barriers to this goal. Curriculum internationalization involves providing students with global perspectives of the discipline and giving them a broader knowledge base for their future careers. The knowledge, skills and behavior are discussed in the literature in relation to the graduates’ skills and global citizenship with an understanding that graduates today need the competencies to communicate and compete in a rapidly changing, complex global world.
The authors’ aim is to show the design models and frameworks for learning and teaching at the TISP. This programe is a case study of the organizational change involved in one institution's (Tomsk State University, Russia) attempts to implement concept of curriculum internationalization and philosophy of open education in the field of natural sciences.
We identify significant staff and faculty issues requiring consideration in the change that accompanies curriculum design, such as the powerful effect of the traditional notion and the need for continued resources to support the changes.

Speakers
VD

Victor Dyomin

Tomsk State University
HK

Herman Kingma

Maastricht University, Tomsk State University
avatar for Olga Maslennikova

Olga Maslennikova

Director Centre for joint academic programs, Tomsk State University
KA

Kira Akimova

Tomsk State University
MO

Marina Ott

Tomsk State University


Tuesday November 26, 2019 16:55 - 17:05
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

17:05

SOCIAL BOOKS CREATOR: cooperative learning and digital competences
This proposal describes an experimentation in progress with a new web app, Social Books Creator (SBC), designed to permit a cooperative construction of open and accessible digital contents for learners with Special Educational Needs, in particular students with mild cognitive disability (DSM-V), attending secondary education, but it can be also a tool and a didactic methodology useful to students all. The app will be freely available on G-suite for education platform.
The SBC’s architecture supports two main features, corresponding to a download area and an upload area:
1) An online repository of high accessibility digital texts ( Social Books Cooperative Press): is a sort of online library that contains digital contents categorized by the users with tags. The contents can be filtered by topic, author, date and accessibility editorial features.
2) An online ebooks editor for the cooperative creation of open and accessible digital contents. The users have the possibility to change interface according to their cognitive style using given template, but they can also be guided with instructions or tutorials in defining a personalized format for their ebooks.
A multimedia educators’ group is in charge to coordinate the activities of our social cooperative, Archilabò, in the field of scholastic inclusion and integrated digital education. The theoretical approaches that structure SBC are based on the idea that we learn better when we learn together, fostering scaffolding and peer-tutoring. All the learning environments, both formal or informal, should take into account the inter-psychic dimension of mental activity and they should consider the importance of the medium used to learn. Different media imply the development of different knowledges and skills and each medium used to learn shapes the way in which we re-organize our way of thinking and learning.

Here you can find a brief presentation of Social Books Creator.


Speakers
PM

Paolo Martinelli

Archilabò_Società cooperativa sociale
FP

Flavia Politi

Learning Tutor, Archilabò_Società cooperativa sociale


Tuesday November 26, 2019 17:05 - 17:15
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

17:30

Open Education Awards for Excellence Ceremony
Join us in congratulating the 2019 Open Education Awards for Excellence recipients.
Award winners in attendance at OE Global19 will be all invited onto the stage to receive their award.

A full list of Award winners is here:
2019 Winners of OE Awards

Award winners at OE Global19 will speak about their work during the lightning talks session on Day 2 Nov 27 (13:20 - 15:35) in room BL28 Carassa Dadda

Tuesday November 26, 2019 17:30 - 18:00
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

19:30

Opening Reception
The 2019 Open Education Global Conference Opening Reception will be held at the La Triennale di Milano. Founded in 1923 and built between 1931 and 1933, La Triennale di Milano is a design and art museum.

There is no additional cost to attend the Opening Reception however, in order to ensure sufficient catering reservations were required at time of registration. Please join us if you included an Opening Reception Reservation during your registration process.

Getting there:
Metro: Lines 1 and 2, stop Cadorna – Triennale
Bus: Line 61, stop Triennale
Train: Milano Cadorna Railway Station

Tuesday November 26, 2019 19:30 - 21:30
La Triennale di Milano Viale Emilio Alemagna, 6, 20121 Milano MI, Italy
 
Wednesday, November 27
 

08:00

Registration
Wednesday November 27, 2019 08:00 - 09:00
BL28 ground floor entrance reception area

09:00

Welcome, Summary of Day 1 & Orientation to Day 2
General Updates: Conference Organizers
Program Updates: Chrissi Nerantzi, Program Chair

Speakers
avatar for Chrissi Nerantzi

Chrissi Nerantzi

Principal Lecturer in Academic CPD, Manchester Metropolitan University
Chrissi Nerantzi (@chrissinerantzi): Is a Principal Lecturer in Academic CPD in the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at Manchester Metropolitan University in the United Kingdom. Her approach is playful and experimental and she specialises in creative, innovative and... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 09:00 - 09:10
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

09:10

Opening Address: Role of Libraries in promoting Open Education

The role of national, local and university libraries is key in promoting the Open Education culture in Higher education. Nowadays libraries aren’t just repositories, but are crucial nodes of the knowledge production and diffusion process in which Open Educational Resources could play the role of innovation driver.

Speakers
DR

dr. Rosa Maiello

President & Director, Italian Library Association & Library of the University Partenope, Naples


Wednesday November 27, 2019 09:10 - 09:30
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

09:30

Keynote: Advancing Science & Math Education Worldwide Through OER: Lessons learned from PhET interactive simulations
Science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education have become a priority for nations around the world, yet many students – in both developing and developed countries – lack access to high quality STEM learning experiences. For 17 years, the PhET Interactive Simulations team has been working to make science and math more engaging and accessible for all learners, worldwide. The challenge faced by educators is that effective STEM learning environments must support student understanding of core concepts, engage students in STEM practices, and develop students to think like STEM experts. The PhET project has focused on creating simulations that simultaneously address these three learning goals, are grounded in education research, work flexibly with a variety of research-based pedagogies, and promote widespread adoption. Today, our collection of 153 interactive simulations are translated into 93 languages and used over 100 million times per year. In this talk, we will reflect on the journey from 2002 to today, examining critical decision points, lessons learned, and innovations around pedagogy, design, technology, licensing, and dissemination that have influenced PhET’s work and its impact. We will consider the role of education research and the question of what to make (and not make) easily adaptable. Finally, we will look ahead to the challenges and opportunities on the horizon – bringing science inquiry to students with disabilities, advancing teacher practice, growing international use, and building a sustainable business model.

Speakers
avatar for Kathy Perkins

Kathy Perkins

Director, PhET Interactive Simulations
Dr. Kathy Perkins directs PhET Interactive Simulations at the University of Colorado Boulder, and is a faculty member in Physics Education Research. Her work focuses on advancing the design and classroom use of interactive simulations to increase engagement and learning in STEM, and... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 09:30 - 10:30
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

10:30

Coffee/Tea Break
Wednesday November 27, 2019 10:30 - 10:45
Break Area

10:45

What is Open Education? Part 1: Are MOOCs Open Educational Resources? A literature review on history, definitions and typologies of OER and MOOCs
Open Education has changed many times over the last decades: After a first boom in the middle of the last century, there was a decline in interest.

In our current century, Open Education gained more popularity through the introduction of Open Educational Resources (OER) and Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Nevertheless, the current focus is different from the past.

This article is the start of a series to contribute to a better grasp of the complexity that Open Education is covering. It is a challenge as it is not an empirical article but philosophical argumentation: It discusses the question whether MOOCs can be considered as OER.

Open Education and OER can be seen and treated as two strands with different developments even though, in theory, OER belongs to Open Education. Different OER definitions and typologies are analyzed and compared in relation to their dimensions and categorizations. Furthermore, the four conditions and two original types of MOOCs are discussed leading to a debate on their quality.

It turns out that there are two perspectives of MOOCs: From the OER point of view, MOOCs as a product can be called an OER if they are fulfilling the OER definition and requirements. From the Open Education point of view, MOOCs are going beyond OER as enablers of Open Education understood as innovative concept and methodology for changing education towards collaborative and moderated learning experiences.

That is reflected by the dimensions of the introduced OpenEd Quality Framework and is confirming the need of the two distinctions.

Therefore the short answer to our leading question: "Are MOOCs Open Educational Resources?" is: sometimes and it depends from the perspective that you take.
For the full answer: Have a look into our extended article that was accepted for Open Praxis and will be published soon! (Afterwards you can retrieve it from here: www.opening-up.education )


Speakers
avatar for Christian M. Stracke

Christian M. Stracke

ICDE Chair in OER and Associate Professor for Open Education, Open University of the Netherlands
Dr. Christian M. Stracke is ICDE Chair in OER and Associate Professor for Open Education at the Welten Institute of the Open University of the Netherlands (OUNL) (www.ou.nl/web/welten-institute). In addition he is Advisory Professor at the East China Normal University (ECNU) in Shanghai... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Downes

Stephen Downes

National Research Council Canada
Stephen Downes works in the fields of online learning and new media. Downes has explored and promoted the educational use of computer and online technologies since 1995 and continues to focus on researching how educators approach internet-based education. His major goal for the future... Read More →
GC

Grainne Conole

Dublin City University
avatar for Daniel Burgos

Daniel Burgos

Director Research Institute UNIR iTED, Universidad Internacional de la Rioja (UNIR)
Prof. Dr. Daniel Burgos works as Vice-rector for Knowledge Transfer & Technology (http://transfer.unir.net), UNESCO Chair on eLearning and ICDE Chair in OER (http://research.unir.net/unesco) at Universidad Internacional de La Rioja (UNIR, http://www.unir.net). He is also Director... Read More →
avatar for Fabio Nascimbeni

Fabio Nascimbeni

Assistant Professor, Universidad Internacional de La Rioja
I work as assistant professor in the Universidad Internacional de La Rioja (UNIR), and I am a senior fellow of of the European Distance and eLearning Network (EDEN) and a fellow of the Centro de Estudos Sociedade e Tecnologia of the University of Sao Paulo (Brazil) and of the Nexa... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 10:45 - 11:15
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

10:45

Becoming an Open Education Influencer: Empowering for Open Advocacy
‘Becoming an Open Education Influencer’ (BOEI) is an informative and practical, fully online course that supports influencers of and for Open Education. The BOEI project is included in the UNESCO Open Education for a Better World programme, an international mentorship collaboration.

The aim of the BOEI course is to support pathways for individuals and groups wishing to influence decision-makers, and who want to affect decision-making and practices through direct actions in Open education. The course covers the process of influencing, as adapted from the Contribute, Attribute, Release and Empower [CARE] framework for Open Stewards (Petrides, Levin, and Watson, 2018) as 4 of the cornerstones of influencing practice. The course includes a uniquely South African ‘humanising’ (Zinn and Rodgers, 2012) element, introducing Ubuntu as philosophy and practice of generosity.

Participants will be introduced to the BOEI course development process, lessons learned in the process, and explore the experiences of students as co-creators of knowledge. The Open Education Influencers (OEIs) project, the student-driven advocacy component of the training programme, started at Nelson Mandela University in South Africa in 2018. #OpenEdInfluencers started as an initiative to empower, capacitate and strategically deploy student advocates across university campuses, and developed into a training programme co-created by students and staff.

The #OpenEdInfluencers increase awareness of Open Educational Resources, and facilitate better adoption and creation of OER at the institution. All the while, #OpenEdInfluencers energetically advocate for the use of Open Textbooks across purpose, faculties and schools; conducting research into student experiences with OER and textbooks.

In this session: The #OpenEdInfluencers from Nelson Mandela University will present a conference presentation about the BOEI project, sharing its inclusion in the UNESCO Open Education for a Better World programme.

The #OpenEdInfluencers also present a poster sharing exploratory findings about student awareness and experiences with OER Textbooks at Mandela University.

Speakers
avatar for Nomawethu Matyobeni

Nomawethu Matyobeni

OpenEdInfluencer/ Student researcher, Nelson Mandela University
I am an OpenEdInfluncer at Nelson Mandela University and student researcher. I am also a Registered Counsellor by profession. Psychology is my passion and I will be doing a Masters in Clinical Psychology in 2020 at Stellenbosch University. It has been exciting to learn how Open Education... Read More →
avatar for Gino Fransman

Gino Fransman

GO_GN PhD Researcher/ Coordinator ALW- NMMU, OpenEdInfluencers / Nelson Mandela University
I'm a South African intent on being a contributor to education development, in the realm of Open, as freely accessible and unrestricted by issues of access or privilege. I am a researcher of what is potentially useful in education development, seeking applicable strategies for its... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 10:45 - 11:15
BL27.08 ground floor classroom - Presentations

10:45

EntreCom4ALL MODEL to sustain the entrepreneurship competence needs
The European Commission has been promoting entrepreneurship as a key competence. EntreComp was published by the European Commission published in 2016 “The Entrepreneurship Competence Framework” (EntreComp)] to develop a common conceptual approach to support the development of entrepreneurial education.
This paper presents the EntreCom4ALL model, as an example of adaptation of the EntreComp framework, and how its target groups are aligned and sustain the SDG. The EntreCom4All project aims to improve the accessibility of entrepreneurial education to young or female entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial teachers or trainers, by developing an online platform that provides access to relevant Open Educational Resources on entrepreneurship. OERs can be seen as basic elements of a trend towards more openness in education. These OERs do not only need to be gathered and stored, it is also equally important to improve their visibility and use for the target groups that they are aimed at.

Speakers
ET

Edmundo Tovar

Universidad Politécnica de Madrid
BT

Bernardo Tabuenca

Universidad Politécnica de Madrid
NP

Nelson Piedra

Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja


Wednesday November 27, 2019 10:45 - 11:15
BL27.07 ground floor classroom - Presentations

10:45

Has “Opening” Higher Education Imperiled the Commons?
Session Table Name: NAPOLI

Has “open”, which we normally associate with positive effects, actually had unintended negative consequences for higher education?

This World Cafe discussion considers that question using the lens of higher education as a commons. My current research indicates the answer is yes and I have posited a framework and narrative for how, at least for the United States, that has happened.

The question for participants at this café table is: Does this ring true for your country, culture, or institution? Has efforts to “open” access to higher education, that is, to greatly scale participation in higher education and educate more students, actually had the negative unintended consequence of changing the nature of higher education itself? Have technological changes that have “opened” the campus also resulted in commodification of learning itself and attempts to enclose the commons?

The discussion will open with a brief of the higher education-as-commons institutional framework first presented at the OER19 conference and updated with a brief narrative of how two waves of “open” in the United States have actually had negative unintended consequences. The first wave was the effort to greatly scale participation in higher education and resulted in the burea-state and firm-market orientations exerting dominance in colleges and universities to the detriment of the learning commons. The second wave has been the technological wave that has resulted in publisher efforts to enclose the commons as a means to replace the control they once had via the printing press.

With the help of participants I aim to explore the hypothesis that this is a global phenomenon and not just a United States narrative. If so, it may shed light on how we may collectively reassert open as a positive force that supports the commons.

Speakers
avatar for Jim Luke

Jim Luke

Prof. Economics / Open Learning Lab, Lansing Community College
Known as Econproph on the webs. I'm Professor of Economics & Open Learning Faculty Fellow in the Center for Teaching Excellence at Lansing Community College. I write about open and the economics of higher education and the commons - see my blog at econproph.com. Inventor & innovator... Read More →



Wednesday November 27, 2019 10:45 - 11:50
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

10:45

Developing a quality model and designing a search tool for high-quality Open Educational Resources
Session Table Name: ROMA

We present a novel approach to establishing a quality model for OER, based on quality aspects that are considered to be universally accepted in any educational resource, as well as a number of aspects that are dependent on the goal and preferences of the educator that is looking to adopt OER to his or her teaching. We approach the concept of quality as something that is dynamic, constantly changing and time- and purpose-dependent. This means that determining whether a resource is of high quality is a continuous process that changes with technological advancements, current trends and the experiences of a user.
Determining what aspects of quality are measureable serves as a basis for designing an automated search tool that is capable of searching through multiple OER repositories simultaneously and evaluate large amounts of OER on relevancy, and a range of other aspects that can define the quality of the resources. We will engage with the participants of the World Forum to discuss such a design and to get feedback on our approach to evaluating quality of OER.
The participants will be discussing topics regarding the quality of OER, to gain insight into recognizing quality of OER and into requirements of an automated search algorithm capable of finding high-quality resources. These topics include: which aspects of OER are accepted as general measures for high quality; purposes for which someone might search for OER and what aspects of resources label them as high quality for those purposes; properties that should be evaluated by an automated search algorithm in order to recognize high-quality OER; which OER platforms and repositories should be evaluated by the search algorithm. The discussions will serve as the basis for determining which aspects of OER make it a quality resource and to develop an search tool capable of quantifying quality.

Speakers
avatar for Michiel de Jong

Michiel de Jong

Open education Specialist, Delft University of Technology
It is my mission to ensure that our excellent teachers at the Delft University of Technology have all the room and support they need to use and produce open educational recources (OER). I focus on facilitating Open Textbook publishing. I make sure that prospective authors have access... Read More →
GZ

Georgia Zarnomitrou

Delft University of Technology



Wednesday November 27, 2019 10:45 - 11:50
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

10:45

Making Connections with Open Pedagogy
Session Table Name: VENEZIA

The goal of this World Café session is to share ideas about making connections between the life and learning experiences of students and the learning experiences in an educational system. By the end of this session, I hope to find the most important question(s) we should be asking and some creative solutions to making these connections.
1. What makes learning experiences meaningful?
2. Is there a need or should it be a goal to make learning experiences meaningful for students?
3. How does an understanding of the knowledge, values, and skills of our students connect to relevancy in learning experiences?
4. How can we determine local knowledge, cultural values, and literacy skills and how can we create learning environments and lessons to create meaning learning experiences? Who are our students? What are their values? What are their experiences?
5. What are the questions we can ask ourselves as practitioners to understand our students?
6. Are the connections between creating meaningful learning experiences different for different groups of learners?
The answer might lie in open pedagogy, in creating learning experiences that value the experiences of the learner and in creating learning experiences that are diverse in knowledge, skills, and creativity.
How does open pedagogy facilitate connections between the experiences of the learner and the learning experiences?
Open education is an important cornerstone of my challenge to create meaningful learning experiences for students. My future project is to continue to find ways of understanding the learning experiences, values, and skills of students in my classes in order to continue to create meaningful learning experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Lori-Beth Larsen

Lori-Beth Larsen

Instructor, Central Lakes College


Wednesday November 27, 2019 10:45 - 11:50
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

10:45

Open Education and its unknowns
Session Table Name: FIRENZE

This session continues discussions from the OER19 conference in Galway, Ireland which introduced the “Helen Lovejoy phenomenon in Open Education”.

With the reference to The Simpsons character we shed light to situations in which adults pretend to think not OF the children but FOR them, i.e. patronizing them. There is also a Helen Lovejoy Syndrome in Open Education: We tend to think not only OF the learners but we intend to think FOR them. ( “We” refers to educators and educational institutions that design and provide OER).

At the OE Global 2019 we will provide a brief summary and then introduced the audience to new issues of unknowns in Open Education which will be discussed on-site as well as on-line.

Speakers
avatar for Markus Deimann

Markus Deimann

Researcher at Fern Universität in Hagen, FernUniversität in Hagen
avatar for Jöran Muuß-Merholz

Jöran Muuß-Merholz

Founder, J&K
Trying to connect the world of education and the digital world. Writing white papers on OER in Germany (school is already done, now it comes to higher education).
avatar for Gabi Fahrenkrog

Gabi Fahrenkrog

Agentur J&K – Jöran und Konsorten


Wednesday November 27, 2019 10:45 - 11:50
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

10:45

The Change We Seek: An Invitation to Brainstorm and Collaborate to Advance SDGs in Local Communities
Session Table Name: TRIESTE

Do you teach SDGs or work to advance them in your community? A visit to this table at the World Action Café invites you to brainstorm and share ideas about local, national, regional or international efforts that focus on the advancement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. EduChange, a small instructional design firm in the USA, is seeking collaborations with STEM researchers, NGOs, community leaders, business leaders and policymakers who are interested in:

1) connecting multiple worlds of ‘open’—open data, open science, citizen science, OER—with education and action around the SDGs;

2) involving people at all ages who could benefit from educational OER that address specific SDGs and real-world contexts, including ways in which multiple SDGs connect within and across contexts.

For context, from 2016-2018 we updated four full years of interdisciplinary STE(A)M curricula already used in five countries to strategically embed all 17 SDGs through global contexts that connect learning to real life. We worked with an international cadre of STEM practitioners to contextualize the SDGs and make them approachable, personal and real for students. We also tapped multiple open databases, citizen science initiatives, and STEM partners who are taking action in various ways. These partners have suggested that our OER educational materials would be well-suited to community, workplace and adult education programs tied to the SDGs. Please view this short video to get an idea of the possibilities

We also know that many SDG-related efforts exist, and there is a possibility to highlight the endeavors within our OER, for reciprocal benefit. Additionally, we would like to encourage students at the secondary and Community College/Vocational/Trades levels to lead SDG-focused projects in their own communities or collaborate with existing projects led by researchers, NGOs, businesses or community groups.

We hope the World Action Café will generate fresh ideas, connect collaborators, and generally advance collective thinking about the SDGs.

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Saldutti

Catherine Saldutti

President & Founder, EduChange, Inc.
Catherine Saldutti has over 26 years of experience in secondary education, and has served as a teacher, administrator, professional development provider, program evaluator, and instructional designer. She founded EduChange in 2000 to fundamentally reimagine and redesign the systems... Read More →



Wednesday November 27, 2019 10:45 - 11:50
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

10:45

What can Open Education learn from Open Access and Open Science? Partnering with librarians to further Open Education
Session Table Name: BELLAGIO

The core concept behind the World Cafe is to bring together librarians and a range of cross-disciplinary professionals to actively explore how we can better collaborate to increase, and rapidly, access to Open Education resources. This event is being proposed by the European Network of Open Education Librarians. Members of this growing group of academic librarians and OE stakeholders serve as OE ambassadors and facilitators, driving awareness and support for Open Education at our individual institutions. Thanks to the advances made in OA and OS in the past decade plus, the academic and scholarly communities have a store of relevant learnings to draw upon as we intensify efforts to move Open Education forward in Europe. But if we are to fully capitalize on all that we have learned, we must collaborate, partner -- share. Since our inception in Spring of 2018, our Network has done the foundational work of exploring the key challenges to implementing OE. Moving to the next phase of addressing these challenges requires that we draw many more voices into the conversation. Enter OE Global and the World Cafe. Our session would engage a broad swath of stakeholders and foster conversations around how to encourage partnerships and collaborations that advance Open Education.

Speakers
avatar for Vanessa Proudman

Vanessa Proudman

Director, SPARC Europe
avatar for Gaby Lutgens

Gaby Lutgens

Library | Education, skills & support, Maastricht University
My focus is on educational innovation, mainly from the perspective of e-learning and technology enhanced education. Open (and online) education combines both and offer a challenge to organise well. The library looks into services we can offer to teachers (creating and sharing open... Read More →
avatar for Hilde Van Wijngaarden

Hilde Van Wijngaarden

Library Director, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
OER librarians
JN

Jan Neumann

Head of Legal Affairs & Organization, Hochschulbibliothekszentrum des Landes NRW


Wednesday November 27, 2019 10:45 - 11:50
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

10:45

My-MI: understanding the importance of CC licenses to create a collaborative experience guide of Milan - Part II
What better opportunity to explore the potential of Open Education than through a collaborative workshop with people from all over the world that share their experience of Milan?

The aim of the two-days’ workshop is the creation of a collaborative "experiential guide" that represents Milan from the participants point of view, showing the value of sharing to build new collective knowledge. The guide will have a unique value because it will be created by the OE Global 2019 Convention participants and will be available on the Convention to be used by anyone.

During the workshop, participants will learn how to assign and manage Creative Commons licenses while building the guide that is the result obtained by sharing everyone's knowledge and personal experience.
Through co-design tools we will build "MY-MI", an unconventional, funny, non-linear guide of Milan, which will narrate the individual participant experiences lived within the city and the Politecnico.

2nd day activities
On the first day we collaborative built the contents of the guide that will be assembled and finalized in this second day of workshop.

Starting from the collaborative shared material created during day 1, participants will generate the sections of the final guide. The shared material can be used, reworked, remixed based on the license that has been assigned by the participants of the first day. This will allow to learn how to use the contributions correctly, based on both content and compatible licenses.

Please bring your own device, better if tablet or notebook. If you can't, the group will support you, don't worry!
Please add this workshop to your sched if you are willing to join us, so that we can see in advance how many participants are going to be there, for logistic reasons. 

Participation in both workshops is not mandatory.

Speakers
avatar for Prof. Maria Rita Canina

Prof. Maria Rita Canina

IDEActivity Center, Department of Design at Politecnico di Milano
PL

Prof. Laura Anselmi

IDEActivity Centre, Department of Design at Politecnico di Milano
avatar for Carmen Bruno

Carmen Bruno

PhD Student, IDEActivity Center, Department of Design at Politecnico di Milano


Wednesday November 27, 2019 10:45 - 12:15
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

11:20

Copyright OER as Open Education Enabler
Concerns over copyright issues can present a practical barrier to open educational resource (OER) use and adoption. The proposed presentation provides a case study of the University of Alberta’s Opening Up Copyright (OUC) instructional module series and discusses how the series improves access to knowledge about copyright: through its content creation and delivery; by modeling best practices; and by incorporating community engagement into its design. These three facets of open education will be explored in the presentation.

First, OUC aims to support educators and students in an open education environment by providing accessible information on the subject of copyright. Module content is offered at a range of levels, from introductory issues about practical topics (such as copyright issues related to the use of images) to advanced legal discussions based on specific sections of the Canadian Copyright Act or major Supreme Court of Canada cases.

Second, OUC benefits other OER creators by demonstrating best practices in the use of copyright-protected and open content. This includes making extensive use of open and public domain content in the modules and also developing modules that specifically address public domain resources, the role of open licensing, and how to locate open content.

A third means through which the project serves open education and OER is through its intentional outreach activities, which include conference presentations, email updates to relevant listservs to raise awareness and engagement, and also by providing a series of open, editable pages where anyone can comment on and contribute to the project.

The proposed presentation concludes by highlighting OUC’s role in connecting to the theme of the conference that aims to emphasize the opportunities of open education as a means to empower and increase access to quality educational opportunities.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Guy

Julia Guy

University of Alberta
I'm a graduate student currently in my second year of a combined Masters in Library and Information studies and Digital Humanities program and a contributor to the University of Alberta's Opening Up Copyright series.
KJ

Kris Joseph

University of Alberta
avatar for Amanda Wakaruk

Amanda Wakaruk

Copyright Librarian, University of Alberta
Amanda Wakaruk is the Copyright Librarian at the University of Alberta. She completed her Master’s in Library and Information Studies at the UofA in 1999 and worked in public, special, and academic libraries in Edmonton, Virginia, and Toronto before returning to Alberta after... Read More →
AS

Adrian Sheppard

Director, Copyright Office, University of Alberta
MM

Michael McNally

University of Alberta
Michael B. McNally is an Assistant Professor at the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Alberta. His research interests include intellectual property and its alternatives including open educational resources, user-generated content, radio spectrum management... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 11:20 - 11:50
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

11:20

Unpacking the Experience of an Adjunct’s Participation in an Open Pedagogy Project Supported by the Library
A common thread throughout the literature on adjunct faculty is that they consistently report feeling disconnected from the institution(s) they work for. As a result, we typically see that adjunct faculty are reluctant to pursue the adoption of “radical” teaching practices, like open pedagogy, and this reluctance is exacerbated by the time and effort required to make such pedagogical shifts. This presentation will unpack and examine one adjunct’s experience of participating in a library-led OER Faculty Fellowship opportunity that was open to both full-time and adjunct faculty at a private, 4-year institution in the United States: how her participation served to create an unexpected connection with a librarian and ultimately helped integrate her into the larger campus community. As the OER and OEP communities continue to grow and diversify, we hope this presentation will help spark a dialogue about how the academic community, not just the library, can play a role in facilitating and driving the inclusion and support of adjunct faculty now, as opposed to leaving them as an afterthought.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Miceli

Heather Miceli

Adjunct Professor, Roger Williams University
Interests: Open pedagogy in science courses, Adjunct support systems
avatar for Lindsey Gumb

Lindsey Gumb

Scholarly Communications Librarian, Roger Williams University


Wednesday November 27, 2019 11:20 - 11:50
BL27.08 ground floor classroom - Presentations

11:20

Creating Educational Equity through OERs and Open Degree Plans
Today’s learner needs a flexible, customized approach to earning a college degree. Many adult learners have a wealth of work experience, transfer credit, military training, or credit from other sources. Part of Purdue Global University, Open College provides access to free and low-cost open resources to support students with prior college-level learning during every step of their educational journey. This unconventional approach to education removes traditional barriers to college credit by placing learners in an open environment, which encourages independent and critical thinking.

This presentation discusses the Bachelor of Science in Professional Studies degree, ways to earn credit, prior learning assessment, and open educational resources. Special emphasis will be placed on open educational resources and building a community of learners.

The session will engage participants with an open discussion on use of OERs, gaining institutional buy-in for OERs, and a resource-share opportunity.

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Stevenson

Carolyn Stevenson

Faculty Advisor, Purdue University Global
Dr. Stevenson completed her Ed.D. from Roosevelt University, M.B.A. from Kaplan University, and M.A. in Communications from Governor’s State University. She also received her certification in Online Learning from the Illinois Online Network (sponsored by the University of Illinois... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 11:20 - 11:50
BL27.07 ground floor classroom - Presentations

11:55

Open Education Resources for students by students: challenges and implications
Linked to the principles of Open Educational Practices (OEP) and Open Educational Resources (OER), open pedagogy is a trend increasingly visible in research and teaching practices, particularly in Higher Education. This pedagogical approach aims to empower learners as OER’s co-creators by following the 5R permissions: Retain, Reuse, Revise, Remix and Redistribute. This presentation reports on an example ‘OER-enabled pedagogy’, designed as a complementary activity (non-credit bearing) for undergraduate language learners (year 2 and final year) at Manchester Metropolitan University (UK). The aim of this research project was to investigate the use of transmedia skills by current students in formal Higher Education and how to reduce the digital dissonance between informal digital learning and formal learning. The study analyses the type of OERs created by the students and the data collected in pre-questionnaires and in the learners’ reflective tasks. The qualitative analysis weighs the advantages and drawbacks. Finally, recommendations for implementing follow-up open pedagogy activities are considered.

Speakers
avatar for Carmen Herrero

Carmen Herrero

Principal Lecturer in Spanish Studies, Manchester Metropolitan University
Carmen Herrero is a Principal Lecturer and Spanish Section Lead in the Department of Languages, Information and Communication at Manchester Metropolitan University. She is the Director of FLAME (Research Centre for Film, Languages and Media Education) [https://www2.mmu.ac.uk/languages/flame... Read More →
DE

Daniel Escandell

Universidad de Salamanca
MS

Marta Suarez

Manchester Metropolitan University


Wednesday November 27, 2019 11:55 - 12:25
BL27.08 ground floor classroom - Presentations

11:55

Instructional Designers and Open Education Practices
Instructional Designers/Learning Designers/Instructional Developers (IDs) occupy a unique position in higher education as a support to faculty in the course development process. As an awareness of OER grows in higher education in Canada and the US, and a body of research pointing to the benefits, barriers and challenges in implementing OER more broadly emerges, it is important to shed the light on the role of instructional designers in relation to open education practices (OEPs). In their role as support to faculty in the course development (and often delivery) process, instructional designers can play an important part in alleviating some of the well-known barriers of OEP: faculty time required to find appropriate OER to adopt or remix, resistance to change, and institutional support (Annand and Jensen, 2017, Barker et al, 2018; Jhangiani et al, 2016). Yet little is known about how IDs engage with OEPs in the course development process and how they see their role in relation to OEPs. This presentation will focus on the results of a qualitative study that examined how instructional designers at BC public post-secondary institutions incorporate OEPs into the course development process or in the process of working with faculty. Results discussed will include: the role of senior leadership; how IDs position and advocate for OEPs in their institutions; and how IDs can be better supported in working with OEPs.

Speakers
avatar for Tannis Morgan

Tannis Morgan

Advisor, Teaching & Learning and Researcher, Open Education Practices, BCCampus


Wednesday November 27, 2019 11:55 - 12:25
BL27.07 ground floor classroom - Presentations

11:55

oerXiv.org, a Dating Site for Aspiring OER Collaborators
In a crowded ecosystem of OER creators and adapters, there are often different teams working on quite similar projects but unaware of each other. To a funding entity this represents an opportunity for potential savings, by supporting only one team per topic, or consolidating (perhaps virtually) the teams to get the product more quickly and cheaply.

Even to the independent practitioners who may inadvertently be working on a project overlapping other practitioners' efforts, this could be a opportunity to share the labor, ideas, and inspiration, or to see what another team is doing because that knowledge allows you to work more purposefully with your own, different approach.

The problem is one of coordination. Since the open ed community neither has nor wants a coordinating overseer, we are building a platform which makes easy the sharing of project descriptions. So long as a reasonable percentage of OER creators or adapters take the courageous step of sharing their project's description on this platform, and other practitioners get the habit of checking it, the OER community can take advantage of the resulting opportunities for collaboration or inspiration from others' work.

It may seem idealistic to believe that a sufficient number of practitioners will be willing to share. But a similar sharing site works extremely well for scholarly preprints across many STEM disciplines: arXiv.org. Our site modeled on this is called oerXiv.org and similarly shares works before they have been published in the normal way for that type of material. For OER, this means OER which are works in progress, and therefore in a state where sharing and collaboration with others working on related topics is possible.

Like a good dating site, oerXiv.org can bring together people with common experiences and interests. If they're lucky, they just may make beautiful children together.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Poritz

Jonathan Poritz

Colorado State University-Pueblo


Wednesday November 27, 2019 11:55 - 12:25
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

12:30

Lunch
Wednesday November 27, 2019 12:30 - 13:15
Break Area

13:20

Open math and stats: how Grasple and universities collaborate to create curated sets of open math and stats exercises (OEAward19)
The past year, several universities (e.g. Delft University of Technology, Utrecht University) switched from commercial textbooks to creating and reusing open exercises using Grasple.

Grasple is a social enterprise with a user-friendly practice platform to collaboratively create and share open (math and stats) exercises.

In this lightning talk we will share with you:

  • how the universities made this switch,
  • what they learned from creating and reusing open materials,
  • where you can find the materials and what you can do to contribute to the collection,
  • how in the future new collaborations will expand the set of open exercises to cover more topics.

You can find the current collections at www.grasple.com/open

Winners of the 2019 Open Education Award for Excellence: OER Collection. 

Speakers
PB

Pim Bellinga

Co-founder, Grasple
TG

Thijs Gillebaart

Co-founder (CTO), Grasple


Wednesday November 27, 2019 13:20 - 13:30
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

13:20

Bottom-up or Top-down or . . . Sideways? Institutional Policy Support for Open Education
PRESENTATION AVAILABLE AT jamesmskidmore.com/presentations. SOCIAL MEDIA: jamesmskidmore

In writing A Place for Policy (appearing summer 2019), a report commissioned by eCampusOntario, we explored the role institutional policy plays in creating more favourable conditions for open educational resources and practices at Ontario’s universities and colleges. We will outline the major findings of the report and discuss their implications for the broader open education community.

An extensive review of the academic and SoTL literature on OER and OEP, as well as background interviews with various stakeholders in Ontario and across North America, surfaced one intractable barrier to wider OER and OEP adoption: the lack of professional recognition for instructors involved in open education, a problem at the root of many of the obstacles facing OER and OEP in higher education.

We take the view that institutional policy is the most effective remedy to this problem. Some proponents of open education, however, feel that the pursuit of policy solutions enables administrative dominance that negates the grassroots support for OER and OEP.

The pushback against policy can be alleviated, however, when stakeholders understand that policy development is an organic process involving both bottom-up and top-down activity. External organizations such as eCampusOntario can play a crucial role by providing sideways facilitation of these processes. Our report recommends that eCampusOntario develop a policy workshop based on an environmental scan model that we created for the report. This scan assists institutions in establishing where they are in terms of OER and OEP, where they want to be, and how to get there.

The model, which we will share in our presentation, illustrates that by thinking globally (believing in the efficacy of open education) and acting locally (establishing an organic policy development process for institutions), grassroots advocates and administrators alike can ensure that open education attains a more prominent place on the higher education landscape.

Speakers
avatar for James Skidmore

James Skidmore

Director, Waterloo Centre for German Studies // Former OE Fellow with eCampusOntario, University of Waterloo
I've written a report on institutional policy and OER - you can read it (https://www.ecampusontario.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/2019-08-07-skimore-oe-policy-report.pdf) or read about it (https://theconversation.com/textbooks-could-be-free-if-universities-rewarded-professors-for-writing-them-125470... Read More →
MP

Myrto Provida

University of Waterloo



Wednesday November 27, 2019 13:20 - 13:50
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

13:20

Developing an Institutional OER Program: Channeling Resources and Finding Partners
Session Table Name: NAPOLI

This session will feature three necessary roles in standing up a successful initiator: the energizer, the funder, and the facilitator. Sometimes these multiple roles are inhabited by only one or two people, we recognize. We will suggest ways of finding advocates and allies, even when that’s the case. And we will discuss with participants what additional roles might be required, beyond these three.

This session introduces an experienced library business manager, highlighting a voice that doesn’t often get represented in the public OER conversation. We will speak to infrastructure and nuts and bolts of building a more organized program. Focusing on building a viable foundation and addressing the practical details of rules and policies surrounding funding an initiative is a crucial step, and one that this session will emphasize. Successful OER programs touch many corners of an institution, and require partnerships with representatives who don’t have familiarity with the unique economics and impact of open education. Establishing and navigating relationships with these stakeholders is vital. This conversation will empower participants to apply the motivations they’ll be exposed to throughout the conference towards the development of their own local practices.

Participants will leave with a tangible document that outlines steps to take at their home institutions, to either develop a new OER initiative or expand an existing one.

The session will consist of four facets:
1-How to build energy
2-How to address skeptics and find resources
3-How to keep the momentum
4-Discussion and takeaways

Speakers
avatar for Alexis Clifton

Alexis Clifton

Director of Open Teaching and Learning, SUNY Geneseo
In my role with the State University of New York (SUNY), I help our 64 colleges and universities establish, support, and expand their OER programs. I'm a passionate advocate for making higher education more accessible, more affordable, and more meaningful for both students and faculty... Read More →
RL

Ryann Lindsay

SUNY Geneseo
avatar for Michelle Beechey

Michelle Beechey

OER Librarian, SUNY OER Services


Wednesday November 27, 2019 13:20 - 14:25
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

13:20

Humanizing Online Teaching and Learning in a MOOC: A reflective look at impact to practice
Session Table Name: ROMA

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have generated considerable interest in the educational research community. This interest stems from the potential that these courses offer in providing flexible, affordable, and on-demand options for learning and development in a time of instant connectivity and constant change. Despite this rise in interest and research output, there are some major blind spots within this field of research that require serious attention. Early research in this area focused on categorizations of MOOCs based on their technological and pedagogical underpinnings, with this focus moving later to issues related to learners’ experiences and patterns of engagement within a MOOC (Olazabalaga, Garrido, & Ruiz, 2016). However, this shift in focus did not extend beyond learners’ experiences and engagement within a MOOC. Many researchers have pointed out the need to examine the impact these informal learning experiences have on participants’ actual practices after they participate in a MOOC and how different design factors support or hinder the transfer of knowledge and experiences gained to real-life situations (Castaño, Maiz, & Garay, 2015; Olazabalaga et al., 2016). Some studies suggest that learners do not use the knowledge they gain in MOOCs in their jobs and that improvements in MOOC design could help remedy this problem (Mathews, 2014).

The purpose of this world cafe session is to share the effectiveness of a MOOC offered on the Canvas Open Network entitled “Humanizing Online Teaching and Learning” (HumanMOOC) by exploring the impact that this
informal learning experience had on learners’ teaching and learning practices after they participated in the MOOC. Our topics of inquiry were: In what ways has participating in the MOOC changed how participants perceive and enhance presence in their online courses? What factors (i.e. course design, personal, and institutional) supported or hindered the implementation of these changes in participants’ actual practice?

Speakers
avatar for Whitney Kilgore

Whitney Kilgore

Chief Academic Officer, University of North Texas & iDesign
Whitney is the Chief Academic Officer at iDesign working with institutions of higher education to build high quality online and blended learning programs. Her primary areas of focus are faculty professional development, personalized adaptive digital content, and learner engagement... Read More →
PT

Patrice Torcivia

Harvard University
MA

Maha Al-Freih

Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University
HR

Heather Robinson

University of North Texas


Wednesday November 27, 2019 13:20 - 14:25
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

13:20

Open and digitally competent academics: European frameworks and tools for professional development and self-assessment
In support of the political agenda for the Modernisation of higher education in Europe (COM 2017) and the Digital Education Action Plan (COM 2018), the European Commission's JRC has developed frameworks and tools to foster innovation in higher education practices, continuous professional development and enhanced teaching practices for academics. 'Practical Guidelines on open education for Academics: Modernising Higher Education Via Open Educational Practices' is a  hands-on check-list based on the OpenEdu Framework (JRC, 2016) to help academics reflect about their skills on open education practices, as well as the challenges they face and the benefits of engaging with new practices. The guidelines provide ideas for academics to start drawing on open education practices from basic to more advanced levels of engagement. In addition, in order to be an open academic, being digitally competent is important. To this end, the DigCompEdu framework and its Check-in tool provide academics with a conceptual framework, reflection and self-diagnosis tool to indicate their proficiency level in digital competence at the same time showing possible routes to level-up. We will look into these tools in depth, exploring opportunities for collaboration, and will be updated on the most recent research initiatives and country-based experiences based on the use of such frameworks and tools.
@aisantos
https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/open-education
http://andreiainamorato.net/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/ainamorato/

Speakers
avatar for Andreia Inamorato

Andreia Inamorato

European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC)


Wednesday November 27, 2019 13:20 - 14:25
BL27.07 ground floor classroom - Presentations

13:20

The imagination of artificial intelligence (AI) in open education
Session Table Name: VENEZIA

The quick expansion of MOOCs has collected a massive amount of learning data. Professionals said that it’s the best time that we know how human learn. Massive data are the foundation of the newly “smart technology”, which it's called “artificial intelligence” in the old days. In this session, I will focus on the application, development or imagination of AI in MOOCs. I would like participants to imagine the possibilities of AI for open education.

Speakers
avatar for Hsu-Tien Wan

Hsu-Tien Wan

Deputy CIO, Taipei Medical University
Hsu-Tien Wan, easily remembered as Marian Wan, is the Vice CIO at Taipei Medical University (TMU, www.tmu.edu.tw), Taiwan. During the past 10 years, as a key member in the IT Office, she has promoted e-learning and managed various ICT platforms. In 2006, Marian began to introduce... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 13:20 - 14:25
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

13:20

Creative Commons Certificate: Now in Italian!
Session Table Name: FIRENZE

The CC Certificate provides an-in depth study of Creative Commons licenses and open practices. Content targets copyright law, CC legal tools, as well as the values and good practices of working in the global, shared commons. Learn more about the CC Certificate and access the course’s open licensed content at https://certificates.creativecommons.org/.

All CC Certificate content is available under the CC BY 4.0 license, making it open educational resources (OER), available in downloadable in editable file formats. While use of the Certificate OER alone does not yield a CC Certification--Creative Commons encourages everyone to use and adapt content to meet their needs.

The CC Certificate is a global course, built with the intention of adaptation and remix. We seek opportunities to share and adapt the course OER for different countries, languages and communal contexts. We also encourage our community members to share local case studies. The more audiences with whom the content resonates, the better.

Since making the OER available, we’ve seen multiple adaptations of the work. In this World Cafe conversation, we will ground discussion around a question about adaptation: “What happens when we relinquish control of our work?” Conversation will also highlight one of the exceptional adaptations of the Certificate that we’ve encountered: the CC Certificate in Italian, complete with the first local case study.

Join us for a conversation about adaptation, and get a “sneak peak” at the CC Certificate in Italian!

Speakers
avatar for Jennryn Wetzler

Jennryn Wetzler

Assistant Director of Open Education, Creative Commons


Wednesday November 27, 2019 13:20 - 14:25
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

13:20

OER Digital Accessibility: Leaving No One Behind
Session Table Name: TRIESTE

More than a billion people live with some form of disability, and 80% of them live in developing countries. Disability is both a cause and a consequence of poverty: poor people are more likely to become disabled, and people with disabilities are among the poorest and most vulnerable groups of the global population. Disability and Accessibility are gaining whole new perspective in current shifting global status quo beyond the initial definition of intellectual, psychiatric, cognitive, neurological, sensory or physical impairment. It is extending to include economic imperatives caused by lack of lifelong learning, disabilities resulting of accident, illness, injury and the process of aging throughout life. That is in addition to disabilities caused by digital divide thus hindering the design for diversity through creating learning experiences that travel the globe. This has perpetuated a situation in which environmental barriers are still preventing persons with disabilities from accessing, participating and being fully-included in social, economic and political activities. To scale to the global education dilemma we have to scale the solutions.

In this session we shall try to broaden our perspective on what is considered a disability and the role of OER in bridging the gap of digital accessibility. We will try to grasp all the aspects of the challenges that face global education in general, open education, and OER from infrastructure to the quality of the resources and what makes them truly open and accessible and its potential in affecting global policies and economies. We will also try to investigate and design an inclusive roadmap that would highlight the role of OER in solving disability and accessibility issues through setting a collaborative session among teachers, administrators, legislators, state and federal leaders, parents and community members.

Speakers
avatar for Naeema Zarif

Naeema Zarif

Founder, The Fifth Corp
After spending 8 years in the private sector, during which she lead multinational teams to conceptualize and implement digital communication of international brands, Naeema Zarif took a leap into non- for-profit in 2009, thus pioneering change leadership in MENA through joining forces... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 13:20 - 14:25
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

13:20

The Quality Reference Framework for MOOC Design and Evaluation
Session Table Name: BELLAGIO

This paper introduces "The Quality Reference Framework (QRF) for the Quality of MOOCs". It was developed by the European Alliance for the Quality of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), called MOOQ. Overall, MOOQ could address and reach out to more than 100,000 MOOC learners, designers, facilitators and providers through dissemination and exploitation activities. Main objective of MOOQ was the development of the QRF finalized and published in the year 2018 after more than three years of revisions. In close cooperation with leading international institutions and associations, MOOQ could involve in the QRF finalization more than 10,000 MOOC learners, designers, facilitators and providers through divers means including the Mixed Methods research with the Global MOOC Quality Survey (GMQS), the MOOQ presentations and workshops at regional, European and international conferences as well as communication and collaboration in traditional channels and social media. The QRF consists of three dimensions: Phases, Perspectives and Roles. They were carefully selected, discussed and agreed with all MOOC stakeholder groups to cover the different views, requirements and responsibilities during the lifetime of a MOOC. The paper presents the two QRF quality instruments: the QRF Key Quality Criteria for MOOC experts and the QRF Quality Checklist for MOOC beginners.

Speakers
avatar for Christian M. Stracke

Christian M. Stracke

ICDE Chair in OER and Associate Professor for Open Education, Open University of the Netherlands
Dr. Christian M. Stracke is ICDE Chair in OER and Associate Professor for Open Education at the Welten Institute of the Open University of the Netherlands (OUNL) (www.ou.nl/web/welten-institute). In addition he is Advisory Professor at the East China Normal University (ECNU) in Shanghai... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 13:20 - 14:25
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

13:30

University of Cantabria: 10 years sharing knowledge and opening education (OEAward19)
OCW Universidad de Cantabria (OCW UC) has been creating OpenCourseWare since 2009, expanding and improving their list of resources every year. OCW UC is the most visited repository in Spain and one of the most relevant resources in Latin America. Their open repository currently offers more than 230 courses in a wide variety of disciplines, including two full Degrees.

Moreover, the University of Cantabria contributes to fostering open education through initiatives such as its Repository of Teaching Resources. This carefully selected and organized collection of resources serves to enhance teacher's knowledge on open education methodologies, and improve their ability to create high quality teaching materials and activities. This repository is constantly updated to include the latest developments in each one of its categories:

  • Applications and services. This section contains applications, websites, tools and services that may be useful to teachers.
  • Online courses. Amongst the thousands of free and open online courses available, this is a curated selection of course that may be of general interest to teachers.
  • Educational conferences and events. Educational innovation is a key issue at universities and this third category focuses on important educational conferences and events.
  • Open educational resources. This category provides a large number of websites that have been published or promote the use of materials with open licenses.
  • Training in online teaching. This section contains courses and video tutorials about online teaching.
  • Repositories. This final section provides links to other websites where you can find open resources presented in an organized and easily navigable manner.

Each category is divided into subgroups which can be filtered using keywords, facilitating searches.

Open resources are not just necessary, but must be also known and used. This is the goal of the University of Cantabria.

Winners of the 2019 Open Education Award for Excellence: OER Repository

Speakers
avatar for Sergio Martínez

Sergio Martínez

Director of E-learning Support Unit, University of Cantabria
PS

Pedro Solana

Director of Quality and Teaching Resources Planning, University of Cantabria
EA

Ernesto Anabitrate

Vice-Rector for Faculty and Academic Affairs, University of Cantabria


Wednesday November 27, 2019 13:30 - 13:40
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

13:40

Enhancing OER Discovery with OASIS (OEAward19)
OASIS is an OER search tool developed at SUNY Geneseo’s Milne Library by Bill Jones (Digital Resources and Systems Librarian) and Ben Rawlins (former Library Director) in consultation with Alexis Clifton (Director of Open Teaching and Learning) and Allison Brown (Digital Publishing Services Manager).  This tool searches multiple vetted sources for materials, a majority of which are in the public domain or openly licensed.  

OASIS helps fills a void in the discovery of open content and eliminates a barrier to OER adoption by reducing the frustration in finding relevant materials. Developed over the span of two and half months, OASIS has a simplistic, easy-to-use, and mobile-friendly interface that was built utilizing the Bootstrap framework. When OASIS was officially launched on September 5, 2018, it searched 52 different sources and contained more than 155,000 records. Since then, we have added 46 additional sources and more than 213,000 additional records, some of which have been recommended by the OER community. In its current state, OASIS searches open content from 98 sources and contains more than 368,000 records.

To date, OASIS has had 40,386 users from 142 different countries, with 53,147 sessions and 198,834 page views. Users can search using single/multiple words and “quoted phrase” strings, or users can select a particular material type by clicking a button on the homepage to limit results to a particular type. Searchable material types include textbooks, courses, course materials, interactive simulations, public domain books, audiobooks, modules, open access books, videos, podcasts, and learning objects.

We are continuing to look at ways that we can enhance this project to make it even more useful to our faculty, librarians, and other members of the OER community.

Winners of the 2019 Open Education Award for Excellence: OER Curation

Speakers
avatar for Bill Jones

Bill Jones

Digital Resources and Systems Librarian, SUNY Geneseo
Bill Jones is the Digital Resources and Systems Librarian at SUNY Geneseo Milne Library and the SUNYConnect Systems Librarian at the Office of Library and Information Services at SUNY System Administration.  Bill is the President of the State University of New York Librarians Association... Read More →
avatar for Ben Rawlins

Ben Rawlins

Library Director, SUNY Geneseo
Co-developer of OASIS
avatar for Alexis Clifton

Alexis Clifton

Director of Open Teaching and Learning, SUNY Geneseo
In my role with the State University of New York (SUNY), I help our 64 colleges and universities establish, support, and expand their OER programs. I'm a passionate advocate for making higher education more accessible, more affordable, and more meaningful for both students and faculty... Read More →
avatar for Allison Brown

Allison Brown

Digital Publishing Services Manager, State University of New York at Geneseo (SUNY Geneseo)



Wednesday November 27, 2019 13:40 - 13:50
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

13:50

An Open Online Course: Zero Textbook Cost Pathways: OER & Equity (OEAward19)
This open online course explores the fundamental connections between Equity, Open Educational Resources (OER), Guided Pathways, and Zero Textbook Cost (ZTC) programs. Participants employ an equity cognitive frame to examine the impact of costs on student success, and the disproportionate impact on historically underserved students. Participants also examine research on OER efficacy, consider the "what" and "why" of Guided Pathways, and review case studies on successful ZTC pathways in the USA.

Participants will leave this course understanding how OER and ZTC pathways promote student success and reduce equity gaps, supporting the expanded access and success within higher education.

This present example of the course contains references specific to the California Community Colleges and US higher education. Thanks to the open license, the course could easily be adapted to make the link between Equity, OER, and Zero Textbook Cost programs in other contexts.

This course was created as part of the California Community Colleges’ Zero Textbook Cost Degree program. The course was designed by Aloha Sargent of Cabrillo College and conceived by James Glapa-Grossklag of College of the Canyons.

Winners of the 2019 Open Education Award for Excellence: Open Course

Speakers
avatar for James Glapa-Grossklag

James Glapa-Grossklag

Dean, Educational Technology, Learning Resources, and Distance Learning, College of the Canyons
James Glapa-Grossklag is the Dean of Educational Technology, Learning Resources, and Distance Learning at College of the Canyons (California, USA). He directs the statewide CCC DECT grant and also co-coordinates Technical Assistance for the CCC Zero Textbook Cost grant program. James... Read More →
AS

Aloha Sargent

Cabrillo College


Wednesday November 27, 2019 13:50 - 14:00
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

13:55

The Dutch ‘not going Dutch’: sharing and reusing collections open learning materials within teacher communities and tools they use.
In the Netherlands communities of teachers gain experience with collaboratively building and reusing collections of qualitative outstanding digital open learning materials. These communities are domain specific and cross-institutional. In addition to a platform where the community can collaborate and a repository where the materials are stored, the community needs to organize and set up a process.
When teachers collaborate in building a collection together they, for instance, need to agree on what the key topics of their collection will be and translate these topics to a domain specific taxonomy that structures their collection and supports findability of the materials. Furthermore, they need to agree on what they qualify as good materials: which materials qualify for reuse and what are the criteria when developing materials together. A quality model is an instrument that can help communities of teachers with this process.

SURF offers a national service that facilitates teacher community's in higher education to share and reuse each other’s digital learning materials freely and successfully under an open license. Findability, relevance and quality assurance of these open educational resources are key. Therefor the quality models, marks and taxonomy's are embedded in this service.

During the presentation the audience will be inspired and understand more how Dutch communities of teachers build en reuse their collections. The audience will receive tools for building a collection with communities of teachers and learn the added value of two specific instruments for building sustainable collections with communities of teachers: 1. Quality models and quality marks and 2. Specialized vocabularies for structuring the collection and increasing findability.

Speakers
avatar for Lieke Rensink

Lieke Rensink

Projectleader OER, SURF
KV

Kirsten Veelo

Projectmanager Open Leermaterialen, SURF


Wednesday November 27, 2019 13:55 - 14:25
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

14:00

The Blueprint for Success in College and Career Project – A Look Behind the Scenes (OEAward19)
The Blueprint for Success in College and Career OER textbook was originally intended to be used at Grossmont College for a College and Career Success course. In less than two years from its release, it has been adopted widely across the United States and Canada and has won two awards. An inside look at the project from start to finish will include successes, collaborations, and challenges, with lessons learned from curating an openly licensed remix, and vision for the future.

Winners of the 2019 Open Education Award for Excellence: Open Textbook

Speakers
avatar for Dave Dillon

Dave Dillon

Counselor/Professor, Grossmont College
I am on sabbatical leave during the Spring '17 semester to develop an OER for a few College Success courses. I started an OER Workgroup on the Grossmont (San Diego) campus a few years ago and am Chairing the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges OER Task Force.


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:00 - 14:10
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

14:10

PhDOOC, a community around the MOOC PhD and career development (OEAward19)
PhD offer access to a multitude of careers, but many PhD candidates do not know where to find out about them. They feel isolated and struggle to find the time to prepare their future.

The PhDOOC association offers PhD candidates and graduates a MOOC designed to familiarize them with the tools and resources available online. This tailor-made collaborative initiative allows them to draw on the support of a community whilst taking into account their limited time and availability. The aim is to create a space for discussing and finding information on post-doctoral careers. We hope that this MOOC will help create a community focused on sharing, collaboration and peer support.

We have chosen to use a social MOOC model, from the connectivist, or cMOOC, family. This means that learners are encouraged to add to the educational content. The training is based on peer working together and jointly compiling knowledge by encouraging participants to hold discussions and help one another. It enables learners to identify and build their skills portfolio and define their career plan. They receive guidance to develop their communication media using digital tools and expand their professional networks to help them in their job hunt.

With participant numbers reaching over 6,400 after three editions, the next iteration will start on January 2020. Changes and improvements have been made each year with the aim of continually improving the course. Currently, our challenges are to expand the team of volunteers and to raise the empowerment of the participants using the existing community. For instance, we are exploring new networking activities and peer supporting. Our presentation will allow us to discuss these challenges and gather new ideas and feedback.

https://phdooc.moocit.fr/

Winners of the 2019 Open Education Award for Excellence: Open MOOC

Speakers
avatar for Adeline Bossu

Adeline Bossu

PhD, PhDOOC


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:10 - 14:20
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

14:30

The Open Patchbooks (OEAward19)
Educators from around the world have built (& continue to build!) a community patchwork of ‘chapters’ into a quasi-textbook about pedagogy for teaching & learning in higher education. Each patch of the quilt/chapter of the book focuses on one pedagogical skill and is completed and published by different individual faculty members from any institution wanting to join in. There is also a learner version of The Patchbook focusing on what learners need to do to learn. This lightning talk will give you a brief overview of what’s been covered already and how you can get involved.

Winners of the 2019 Open Education Award for Excellence: Open Pedagogy

Speakers
avatar for Terry Greene

Terry Greene

Fleming College & eCampusOntario


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:30 - 14:40
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

14:30

Supporting Open Educational Practices (OEP) through Open Textbooks: A survey of UK HE Educators
The Hewlett funded UK Open Textbooks project (2017-2018) had two aims. First, to investigate awareness of open textbooks within UK Higher Education (HE). Second, to test two highly successful open textbook models of adoption (OpenStax; Open Textbook Network) to assess their transferability to the UK context. To better understand textbook use patterns and the issues faced by students and educators, UK Open Textbooks conducted an incentivised survey of UK educators in September 2018. This presentation will report on the findings of this survey which focused on awareness of open educational resources (OER), textbook use and rationale, awareness and use of open textbooks and open licensing.

The survey work carried out by UK Open Textbooks, and the experience of testing two methods of raising awareness and adoption through workshops and promotional activity, reveal a fertile ground for open textbook adoption with the potential to support a wide range of associated open educational practices. Our findings indicate that the same challenges are consistently experienced across the whole of the UK and indicate possible strategies for raising awareness and supporting pedagogical innovation and student access through the mainstream adoption of open textbooks.

Speakers
avatar for Beck Pitt

Beck Pitt

The Open University
Our mission is to increase access to education through the provision of free, high quality, openly licensed textbooks. OpenStax resources have been used by 3.47 million students worldwide, saving £265 million since the publication of our first textbook in 2012. Come to DS21 in the... Read More →
avatar for Robert Farrow

Robert Farrow

Research Associate, The Open University
Research Fellow @openuniversity / Open Education through a philosophical lens / Projects: @oer_hub @gogn_oer @oerworldmap @JIME_journal / Cat: @tailz_of_terror Project URLS: http://oerhub.net/ https://oerworldmap.org/ http://go-gn.net/ http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/
MW

Martin Weller

The Open University
Digital scholarship, open education, OER Research Hub, ICDE Chair in OER, Battle for Open book
avatar for Katy Jordan

Katy Jordan

PhD student, Consultant


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:30 - 14:40
BL27.08 ground floor classroom - Presentations

14:30

mliteracy - digital reading using social publishing
Getting books into the hands of children is vital if kids are to learn to read. But there are many significant challenges facing those who wish to build a nation of story-readers and story-tellers In South Africa. Social Publishers are publishers who create reading materials for neglected audiences. Rather than operate on a profit basis, these publishers are driven by a mission. They see their books as a social goods, to be directed where they are most needed. This presentation is about mliteracy and how we are getting public librarians up to speed with mobile devices while and broadening uptake and ownership of Social publishing needs to be promoted especially from those who access and use children’s books frequently, like librarians, teachers, social workers etc.

Speakers
avatar for Derek Moore

Derek Moore

Weblearning
I make my living as a consultant. I work with enablers (educators, para-professionals, librarians and academics) to locate routes, bridges or pathways that might narrow the gaps between digital access, digital capability and digital equity.


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
BL27.07 ground floor classroom - Presentations

14:30

Building an open education technology platform for the next 100 years
With the population soaring, humans are rapidly outgrowing Planet Earth. Twenty thousand years ago, a mere blink of the eye in geological terms, humans had a negligible impact on the planet. Now, we are causing huge, potentially irreversible, problems and are destroying our home.

We need to act quickly at this critical moment in history, yet democracy and other structures we’ve looked to help are failing us. We have technology racing ahead of user understanding and human survival is literally under threat.

What we need is quality education. Learning by students who not only explore the internet landscape alone, but who are scaffolded by skilled educators in an environment that promotes soft skills along with broad knowledge about the world we live in and an attitude of involvement. Education that supports the attainment of all of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals.

To be most effective, such educators need skills, great tools and constant support and resources. Simply having good content available on the internet is not enough - these things need to be part of the natural affordances and workflow around a teacher.

It’s proposed that well-designed open technology provides the best and most proven way to do this globally with widespread adoption and customisation, and present some case studies, including Moodle and MoodleNet.

Outcomes will be presented from a very recent conference (OpenEdTech Global in Barcelona, November 2019) that brought together people involved in various open education technology projects to begin collaborating on deciding what a ubiquitous and long-lasting open education technology platform could look like.

Speakers
avatar for Martin Dougiamas

Martin Dougiamas

CEO, Moodle
Martin Dougiamas is best known as the founder of Moodle, the popular learning platform used by millions of educators around the world.As the CEO and Chairman of Moodle Pty Ltd in Perth, Western Australia, he leads the team of software developers at the heart of the Moodle project... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

14:30

Discussion based MOOC: a new challenge
Session Table Name: BARI

 Watch the  Ex Ante Video

This World Cafè will involve OE Global attendees in a common reflection about a specific MOOC format that has been proposed in the field of eLene4Life http://elene4life.eu/. eLene4Life is an Erasmus+ KA2 project (2018-2021) supporting curriculum innovation in higher education through the development of active learning approaches for soft skills, with the ultimate aim of improving students’ employability.
The activity's goal is to come up with an appropriate definition suitable for a "discussion- based MOOC" for teachers. It is a new MOOC format focused on stimulating and supporting users' reflection through experiences shared by peers.
One of the criticisms carried out by some authors in the MOOCs' field concerns the lack of human Interaction. This is the reason why the "discussion-based MOOC" vision is shaped on trying to put people back at the center of the process. In fact, the eLene4Life MOOC will be designed collecting experiences which show how active learning can support soft skills development. These experiences will stimulate participants' reflection and inspire discussion among peers. In this MOOC you will not be “just” a learner but the maker of your learning experience.  
The main questions we'd like to work on are: how can we frame a new MOOC format able to valorize peers' experiences? How can we make them become catalysts that will spark reflection and discussion?

We’d like to work with OEG conference attendees through a three steps brainstorming activity: 
  1. First step: working on a common definition of what attendees at the table mean by discussion-based MOOC, leaving from the following definition: a MOOC where the contents come from storytelling of direct peer experiences.
  2. Second step:starting from the agreed definition, created by the previous group,  going deeper in defining what users should expect to find in this kind of MOOCs in terms of activities, contents, interaction among participants and with teachers.
  3. Third step: reflecting on risks connected to what emerged during the previous  “exploration” phase. Attendees will pretend to be the instructional designer responsible for the MOOC development: which risks will you come across? How can you overcome them?
At the end of the activity the attendee are going to be invited to join an Active Learning online community dedicated to support the soft skills development. Joining this online community will give them the possibility to follow the MOOC development and the project itself.
The idea is to experience both in general and in this world café, the same process and methodology that will be used to spark reflections in the "discussion-based" MOOC itself.
Licence:  CC BY 4.0 


Speakers
avatar for Valeria Baudo

Valeria Baudo

Community Manager & MOOC user support, POLIMI
I graduated in Library and Information Science at University of Parma. After a Phd on Community Management I definitely fell in love with communities. Now I am working at METID-Learning Innovation Center of Politecnico di Milano as community manager. My interests deal with learning... Read More →
avatar for Alessandra Tomasini

Alessandra Tomasini

Project manager and instructional designer, POLIMI
I'm interested in experimenting new teaching and learning strategies both online and in class, with a particular focus on soft skills improvement.


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:30 - 15:35
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

14:30

Student Perceptions of Openness: Survey of Current Literature
Session Table Name: NAPOLI

To date, there is little research that speaks to the student perceptions of open education environments. As higher education institutions change to meet the requirements of contemporary learners, there is a need to discuss the benefits and challenges of implementing open education practices in these spaces. This session will share a review of current literature focused on student perceptions of open educational practices and digital pedagogies implemented within open education environments. By open education environments, we refer to practices that include student and instructor use of institutionally supported open source blogging and other collaboration tools accessible on the open Web, as well as learner-chosen social media. Using the World Café format, the student experience in open education environments will be discussed, and promising practices for students working in these spaces in higher education will be identified. Through a series of questions, participants will examine key issues of (1) transitioning student and teaching roles; (2) evolving support requirements for student and faculty; and (3) developing networked scholars/practitioners. As these questions are explored, participants will be encourage to represent their thoughts using a variety of medium, and the table hosts will summarize and make connections to the other contributions emerging from the World Café. These summaries will be shared more broadly using an electronic whiteboard. Course developers and instructors will gain insights into the supports that are necessary for students and faculty working in these environments. In this session, we hope to foster interest in conducting global collaborative research, in order to better understand students’ needs and expectations when learning in open education environments.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Childs

Elizabeth Childs

Professor & Program Head, Royal Roads University (RRU)
At RRU we are designing a Masters program with openness, networked learning and digital mindset as core design principles.
avatar for Jo Axe

Jo Axe

Professor, School of Education and Technology, Royal Roads University
Royal Roads University
ID

Irwin Devries

Royal Roads University
avatar for Keith Webster

Keith Webster

Associate Director - Learning Technologies, Royal Roads University
I have been an educator for several decades. As an instructor in the Canadian Forces, with a brief turn as a high school teacher, becoming an educational technologist and instructional designer at the University of Victoria in 2004. I became an instructional designer at Royal Roads... Read More →
GV

George Veletsianos

Royal Roads University



Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:30 - 15:35
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

14:30

Wikipedia writing in the PhD curriculum: experiences and challenges
Session Table Name: ROMA

Today, Wikipedia it is probably the foremost source of information on scientific and technical issues (but also art, history, etc.) for the general public. It also provides a natural platform for Open Education, as “free content that anyone can use, edit, and distribute”. In recent years, we have coordinated three editions of a one-week intensive course entitled “Science, technology, society and Wikipedia” for the PhD students in engineering, architecture or industrial design at the Politecnico di Milano. The course is carried out in collaboration with experienced Wikipedia editors. It introduces the students to the workings and rules of Wikipedia and, most of all, engages them in the production of new material for it. The final evaluation of their work is based both on the technical quality of the articles (“referee reports” by academics at the Politecnico) and their adherence to Wikipedia guidelines. The course has been increasingly successful with the students. We have also received positive feedback from the Wikipedia community, and a fourth edition has already scheduled for June 2020. We propose to hold a World Café session. Our aim is share our experience with Open Education experts and discuss ways to improve and possibly expand our course.Ex-ante video: https://youtu.be/0GvQX-ap9fY

Speakers
GR

Guido Raos

Professor, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
CC

Chiara Castiglioni

Politecnico di Milano, Italy


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:30 - 15:35
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

14:30

A Discovery World Café: Opening connections and collaborations for primary and secondary education
Session Table Name: VENEZIA

You are invited to this discovery world café to contribute to the current pulse of open education for the primary and secondary sector. There is a conundrum happening – open practices are embedded in the professional experiences of primary and secondary teachers yet they seldom identify as open practitioners. Sharing and collaborating inform their school and broader contexts yet only pockets of self-identified open pedagogues exist.

The OER developments within higher education have been driven by the costs of textbooks. Although higher education institutes use the terms of open practices (e.g. OER, open access, etc.) the structure of the professorate does not reward curriculum creation or sharing. Ironically, these same practices describe the situation in many areas of primary and secondary teaching. These K-12 teachers create their own content, engage their students in participatory technologies, apply creative representations of knowledge, and encourage aspects of peer review yet this digital and open pedagogy is frequently unlabeled or commended. Additionally, the decision-makers that support these primary and secondary teachers have many competing demands and their knowledge of open educational resources, licensing, and innovative digital practices lacks depth.

What to do? What to change? How can openness in education become better understood, supported and promoted in the primary and secondary sector? What insights from individuals within higher education can be offered to those involved with educating children and teens? How can meeting the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal 4 be met with changes and improvements for awareness and deep understanding of openness in education for young learners?

The questions in this world café are provocations and starting points. We want to assess the current situation, and explore some “big” questions and wicked problems (i.e. difficult or impossible to solve). We want to discuss creations of possibility and consider workable strategies. Please join us!

Speakers
avatar for Constance Blomgren

Constance Blomgren

Assistant Professor, Athabasca University
Dr. Connie Blomgren is an Assistant Professor at Athabasca Univeristy where she has designed and implemented professional learning modules to further digital pedagogy ( Blended and Online Learning and Teaching). The BOLT blog hosts teacher commentaries regarding technology-enhanced... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:30 - 15:35
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

14:30

Build trust not walls: Nurturing global partnerships for an open future
Session Table Name: FIRENZE

Our group is from Canada, a sparsely populated nation and the second largest country in the world. Establishing and maintaining open education relationships and projects across Canada is a challenge. We're certain the same must be true for other large countries. So, during this World Cafe session we will brainstorm about how large jurisdictions might manage global, and intra-national, partnerships. (READ MORE about the history of and challenges regarding open education in Canada.)

Collaboration is key for the amplification of open education activities, especially as institutions share and collaborate in Open Educational Resource (OER) creation, Open Educational Practices (OEP) and Open Research. Establishing connections to enable open collaboration and stimulate growth can be challenging at best, and especially so in the context of large countries or across national and international borders.

During this 60-minute World Cafe session, we will explore how to sustain communities of practice that aim to openly share ideas, projects and educational content, within the context of large countries. We aim to engage participants in meaningful discussions about the impact collaboration can have on shaping the future of Open Education, in particular, by looking at how it can improve sharing of ideas, projects and educational content for a more socially just and equitable learning environment.

We will offer two separate tables with each dedicated to one of these two questions:

1. What are the biggest challenges to collaboration across boundaries (national and/or international) in terms of sharing (working in open contexts) open content, practices and data?

2. What specific opportunities do you see that can help grow and sustain collaborative open education initiatives around the world?

We call on our colleagues from around the world to share experiences from their countries as the group discusses strategies to mitigate challenges and barriers to cross-boundary collaboration and harness the opportunities created by the inherent diversity and richness of contributions from international partners. 



Speakers
avatar for Rosario Passos

Rosario Passos

Instructional Development Consultant, British Columbia Institute of Technology
Open pedagogy; integrating OER in existing curriculum and issues of quality in OER
avatar for Lauri Aesoph

Lauri Aesoph

Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
Lauri supports the development and sharing of open educational resources in British Columbia. She has project managed and led workshops and webinars on the adoption, adaptation, and creation of open educational resources. She also provides technical and instructional design support... Read More →
AL

Ann Ludbrook

Ryerson Univerity
Ann Ludbrook is the Copyright and Scholarly Engagement Librarian at Ryerson University. In her job she manages copyright clearances in the E-Reserve system run by the Ryerson University Library and Archives, educates the Ryerson community about copyright issues and is responsible... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:30 - 15:35
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

14:30

Openness to stimulate the co-construction of creativity manifestos
Session Table Name: TRIESTE

Openness can be a stimulator and amplifier of creativity (Resnick, 2017). Within this wordcafe session we will introduce delegates to the #creativeHE community (Nerantzi, Jackson, Mouratoglou and Baff, 2018) that has engaged in open courses and discussions on the theme of creativity since 2014. Some of these have involved collaboration with other higher education institutions and organisations that harnesses the opportunities open communities bring to connect educational practitioners, students and the wider public across professions and sectors, countries and continents. Open platforms enable people to come together locally and globally to nurture discussions and activities around creativity in higher education.

We will share an activity that was undertaken as a contribution for World Creativity and Innovation Week 2019 with the Creative HE community, the Centre for Imagination in Research, Culture and Education (CIRCE) and led by the Creative Academic Network. The project involved the collaboration of these three established networks and overlapping communities.
Open discussions on Facebook and LinkedIn platforms aimed to develop a Manifesto for Higher Education to encourage and enable learners to use and develop their imaginations and creativity, and gain recognition for their creative efforts and achievements.

The process involved an open-ended inquiry promoted by a series of questions and supported by discussion papers. Participants shared their personal manifestos the forums and other participants were able to value their contributions and add their comments. The overarching openly licensed manifesto was created by one of the facilitators gleaning important ideas from the personal manifestos and has been included in a dedicated open access Creative Academic Magazine (Jackson & Willis, 2019).

During the Worldcafe we will take delegates through the process and create mini personal creativity manifestos and a table manifesto that can be shared more widely.

Note:References didn't fit in the box. We will provide these if accepted

Speakers
NJ

Norman Jackson

Creative Academic
avatar for Gillian Judson

Gillian Judson

Centre for Imagination in Research, Culture and Education (CIRCE)
Dr. Gillian Judson is a long-term lecturer at Simon Fraser University and one of the directors of the Imaginative Education Research Group. Her research is primarily concerned with sustainability and how an ecologically sensitive and imaginative approach to education can both increase... Read More →
avatar for Chrissi Nerantzi

Chrissi Nerantzi

Principal Lecturer in Academic CPD, Manchester Metropolitan University
Chrissi Nerantzi (@chrissinerantzi): Is a Principal Lecturer in Academic CPD in the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at Manchester Metropolitan University in the United Kingdom. Her approach is playful and experimental and she specialises in creative, innovative and... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:30 - 15:35
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

14:30

Video OERs - Challenges and Possibilities
Session Table Name: BELLAGIO

As video has become a primary instructional data type across all sectors of education, it is important to consider how we can make video objects into first-class citizens in the OER movement. In many ways, the complexities of video have hindered their development as OERs; by learning more about these constraints, we can start to outline a framework for overcoming them. Further, there are unique possibilities of video which should be accounted for in this OER effort, and understanding these aspects are necessary in formulating an approach to Open Education Video Resources.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Rubenstein

Jeff Rubenstein

VP Product Strategy, Kaltura


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:30 - 15:35
BL27 ground floor north corridor - World Cafe

14:40

OER translation project as a semi-formal educational program in High school in Japan - Supporting the growth of OER translation volunteers (OEAward19)
Asuka Academy, a non-profit organization founded in 2014, has been dedicated to make the world-class Open Educational Resources (OER) contents available in Japanese through volunteer translation. We also redistribute and promote the quality OER courses in Japan. As of October 2019, we have opened 101 courses including those provided by MIT, UCI, TU Delft, etc. On cumulative basis, the total volume number of learners has grown to 30,704 learners since we started the projects.

Our OER translation has been made possible with the support of by individuals and organizational volunteers in Japan and other countries including the US, New Zealand, and Australia. More than 1,500 volunteers from high schools, universities, corporations, and individuals, have participated in our translation projects.

We found that the key to continuously organize these volunteers is to support them to position the translation projects as a part of their learning journey: intellectual curiosity in the authentic contents, English skill improvement, motivation to study abroad, Creativity Action, and Service (CAS) activities for the International Baccalaureate (IB), collaboration between foreign universities, career advancement, and life-long learning. In particular, more than half of the volunteers are high school students. Some of them have been inspired to study at these foreign universities. Thus, Asuka Academy contributes not only to those who learn through the OER in Japanese but also to those who grow through volunteer translation experiences.

Winners of the 2019 Open Education Award for Excellence: OER Translations

Speakers
YF

Yoshimi Fukuhara

Asuka Academy
TK

Toru Kishida

Vice President, Asuka Academy
HN

Hisaya Nakamura

Asuka Academy
MA

Masuyo Ando

Asuka Academy


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:40 - 14:50
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

14:40

Non-majors as content creators: Working towards content fluency in a general education science course for undergraduates
One underexplored area of Open Pedagogy is the use of Open Educational Practices (OEP) in general education courses. This presentation will highlight an ongoing OEP project in an undergraduate science course for non-majors at Roger Williams University with goals towards a more authentic learning experience and to help students develop “content fluency” - deemphasizing details of a subject in favor of context and allows the students to gain confidence discussing or engaging with the topic, which is an important part of scientific literacy. After some inspiration from a presentation on student-created textbooks, a research paper and poster presentation project was converted into a renewable website creation project utilizing the Google sites platform. Students in a non-majors science course selected topics typically covered in the course and created websites to present sub-topics. The websites are revisited in subsequent semesters by the next cohort of students to add more content, and in the future, to develop supplemental course materials. In converting the project, certain skills were identified as needing to be scaffolded for the students, like understanding copyright and creative commons. An unexpected result of the project conversion was also an overarching change in the pedagogical design of the course to remove exams and include more reflection. The presentation will highlight the successes and missteps of the project, while also showing that open pedagogy can be utilized in general education courses to advance authentic learning and the concept of content fluency.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Miceli

Heather Miceli

Adjunct Professor, Roger Williams University
Interests: Open pedagogy in science courses, Adjunct support systems


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:40 - 14:50
BL27.08 ground floor classroom - Presentations

14:50

Qeios: To give researchers the power to produce, publish and share the world's best knowledge (OEAward19)
Background. Most of the research is inconclusive. Reasons lie both in the current systems of research production and quality check. Lack of communication among researchers brings them to the inability to select the right fundamental definitions when composing their articles. Inconsistency between definitions is the unavoidable result, leading to articles incomparability and therefore research inconclusiveness. Articles thus produced are submitted to scientific journals to be checked and published. Their oligarchic system selects articles on the ability to foster journals’ brand-names rather than actual quality. Despite this, the journal’s brand-name is currently regarded as a marker of quality.

Objectives. Qeios wants to give researchers the power to produce, publish and share the world's best knowledge.

Methods. Researchers connected on qeios.com compose their Articles along with a new object, the Definition, directly on the platform. The Definition is a new piece of knowledge which represents one of the building blocks at the base of research. Articles and Definitions are instantly published on the platform itself with no barriers. A 100% acceptance rate for Articles and Definitions becomes essential to allow the entire researchers’ community performing the most valuable quality check (OPPPR). For the first time, a ranking of Definitions is built which determines what the best building blocks to be used in research are. Results. Researchers have now the power to produce, publish and share new research of increased quality, comparability and reproducibility, greatly reducing the risk of inconclusiveness and thus fueling the entire virtuous circle.

Conclusion. Qeios is a totally new integrated system of research production and quality check which assists researchers in producing the world's best knowledge, while saving time, money, increasing their visibility, satisfying their need of democracy and being economically awarded for their work. A new piece of knowledge, the Definition, allow researchers to do so.

Winners of the 2019 Open Education Award for Excellence: Open Science

Speakers
AB

Alberto Bedogni

University of Padua
GB

Giorgio Bedogni

Italian Liver Foundation - Trieste
MF

Marcello Fuschi

University of Bologna


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:50 - 15:00
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

14:50

PRAXIS: Open Educational Practices and Open Research to face the challenges of critical educational action research
This communication focuses on the key findings of PRAXIS Project, an experience in the context of two public higher education institutions from Uruguay. The Project aims to explore the potential and benefits of communities for the reflection and transformation of teaching practices and the integration of digital technologies in a meaningful way into teaching, as a strategy towards fostering critical literacies, teaching innovations and open educational practices (OEP). Within academic professional learning communities (APLC) and action research, an approach based on OEP and Open Research (OR) was developed. The community involved senior and early career university educators from very diverse disciplines, in a three months course. The syllabus was organized in three modules focused on the identification, reflection and transformation of teaching practices with digital technologies, alternating face to face group meetings and reflective writing-blog posts with peer comments. These writings were openly shared through the academic social network Comunidad ProEVA. Results of the experience, analysis of the virtual interactions in the social network, and lessons learned are presented, as well as the transition to a new project, PRAXIS 2, now in progress.
Key conclusions of the #PraxisUdelar community experience emphasize the impact of combining OEP, OR, APLC approaches, and collaborative and participatory technologies for the transformation of teaching and educational research practices.
The ongoing second project proposes to deepen the work developed in PRAXIS, following and expanding its design, capitalizing the previous work and extending their reach to the teacher trainers.

Speakers
AC

Ada Czerwonogora

Centro Universitario Regional del Este, Universidad de la República
avatar for Virginia Rodés

Virginia Rodés

Associate Professor, Universidad de la República
Coordinates the Virtual Learning Environments Program (ProEVA) and the Open Educational Resources Center (Núcleo REAA) of the Universidad de la República, Uruguay She has developed research in conjunction with academic networks in Latin America and Europe. In the framework of these... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 14:50 - 15:00
BL27.08 ground floor classroom - Presentations

15:00

Open APP to enhance ‘Science in Culture’ through open schooling with fun and immersive learning (OEAward19)
Open’ Education has marked this century through open content, open software, open educational resources, open courses, open textbooks, open data and open science. The most recent approach “open schooling” has emerged to engage students with real-life projects in cooperation with real partners, academic researchers, industry staff, policy makers and community members to tackle local or global challenges. This relevant approach was created to prepare students with knowledge, skills, attitude and values for RRI - Responsible Research and Innovation. Its aim is to foster scientific literate societies who are able to make sense of science and technology innovations and make decision about new advancements that are aligned with societal needs.

To explore this novel approach, the open APP VR CLASSROOM was designed by a team led by the author including students, researchers, technologists, educators and community members. This APP was developed with UNIT3D, 360 video, VR glasses, RRI gamification and creative commons license for Android mobile devices. Our aim was to explore whether mixed realities help learners identify, enjoy and be inspired by ‘Science in Culture’

Our 1st study focused on VR in the museums initiating with the Bletchley Park and Turing’s scientific innovation that changed society, economy, technology and history. This open app was used by the team’s colleagues from different areas in pairs or groups: students, game developers, research educators and tourists. Participants discussed the impact of Turing’s work while were exploring the same areas of the museum together. Fun in learning was described as a key driver based on its novelty with immersive experience. However key difficulties were cocreating new APPs and developing new partnerships to engage more students. New ideas were provided for new Open Apps: VR with RRI in forests, rural communities, innovative workplaces and future learning environments.

Winners of the 2019 Open Education Award for Excellence: Open App

Speakers
AO

Alexandra Okada

Open University


Wednesday November 27, 2019 15:00 - 15:10
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

15:00

OER IN ONLINE LEARNING: TUTORS’ AWARENESS, PERCEPTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF OER USAGE IN DEVELOPING COUNTRY
The use of OER in the education sector is emerging, especially in higher education. With all its advantages, OER provides a new nuance for the spread of science and technology so that giving a chance for anyone to learn. This study aims to analyze the effect of perceived benefits and perceived deterrents on awareness, as well as the influence of awareness on recommendation. The research was conducted in an online learning environment, where we require all tutors to integrate OER into their online learning. With the acquisition of 234 data, the results of the study showed that perceived benefits are statistically influenced awareness and awareness are proven to influence recommendation. It also highlights that tutors have strategic roles in utilizing OER. Therefore, institution must carry out various activities in order to improve the understanding and competence of tutors in terms of OER utilization.

Speakers
RD

Rini Dwiyani Hadiwidjaja

Universitas Terbuka
KR

Kurnia Riana

universitas terbuka
MH

Meirani Harsasi

Universitas Terbuka


Wednesday November 27, 2019 15:00 - 15:30
BL27.08 ground floor classroom - Presentations

15:05

Integrating OEP into an established higher education model
This presentation examines how OEP have been integrated into an established, distance educational model at The Open University, UK, in the context of a postgraduate qualification in Translation and highlights the complex issues that arise when adopting OEP in the context of a distance education HE course.

The MA in Translation was launched in 2017 and is offered as a two-year part-time qualification. Its fully online delivery mirrors the demands of the fast-growing, global Translation Services industry.

A number of innovative practices have been included which align with OEP, conceptualised as a set of practices involving social interaction, co-creation of knowledge and peer learning, and which recast traditional teacher/learner roles in less hierarchical power relations (OPAL, 2011, Andrade et al., 2011, McGill et al., 2013). This conceptualisation of OEP also relates to open pedagogy and open digital pedagogy, with their focus on dialogue, on bringing disparate learning spaces together, and on questioning the power relations that exist within and outside HE (Cronin and MacLaren, 2018). Indeed, in the MA in Translation, students engage in peer review and connect with established translation and language communities, including volunteer translation communities, to develop both their translation and language skills, and useful employability skills.

However, as Sauro (2017) reminds us, ‘domesticating language-learning practices from the digital wilds to the formal classroom’ (p. 140) can involve challenges for both teachers and learners (such as maintaining those components of learning in online communities that make them attractive to participants) and for the online communities themselves whose cultures learners and teachers must be mindful to respect (Minkel, 2015). Finally, we also discuss the ethical considerations of asking learners to contribute, for instance, to volunteer communities.

Speakers
avatar for Anna Comas-Quinn

Anna Comas-Quinn

The Open University
Senior Lecturer in Spanish, School of Languages and Applied Linguistics, The Open University, UK
TB

Tita Beaven

The Open University


Wednesday November 27, 2019 15:05 - 15:35
BL27.07 ground floor classroom - Presentations

15:05

Ready to succeed in life: Using MOOCs to make transitions in work
Watch our Ex-Ante video here!

Massive open online courses (MOOCs) and their variants are one way in which universities have been responding the growing demand from working adults to realise educational aspirations currently not possible through traditional tertiary qualifications. Castells suggests a key challenge for education is helping people to develop ‘self programme-ability’. While responding directly to such societal expectations may be difficult, in specific contexts MOOCs are being used by universities working outside their traditional structures to be more responsive to learning needs. The MOOC literature identifies upwardly-mobile professionals as valuing taking MOOCs for career progression. Our research seeks to explore cases where MOOCs are reported by learners to have in some way been valued for transition in work.

Drawing on our research from “Perspectives from African MOOC takers: understanding transitions in and out of learning and work”, we explore the experiences of people living in African countries who have taken MOOCs developed by the University of Cape Town (UCT). The data reveal diverse uses of MOOCs for making life changes - preparing for study, career advancement, changing fields. In this analysis, we selected working professionals who took courses to make changes in their careers, or ‘work-to-work’ transitions. Our definition of a work-to-work transition relates to career-related moves, such as entering a new workplace or changes within a career.

The paper discusses how African professionals are using MOOCs to respond to unpredictable career paths and unstable employment prospects. We argue the regional context increases the perceived value of MOOCs for interviewees actively seeking low cost, low risk, flexible opportunities for professional development. Exploring the expectations of MOOC takers in developing countries can help improve our understanding of how universities could support these educational aspirations through the provision of flexible online learning opportunities.



Speakers
avatar for Janet Small

Janet Small

Course Development Manager, University of Cape Town
Janet is the manager of the learning design team at the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching at the University of Cape Town. Since 2014 she has been involved in running the UCT MOOCs project, which has now overseen the creation of 22 massive open online courses on Coursera... Read More →
AD

Andrew Deacon

University of Cape Town
avatar for Sukaina Walji

Sukaina Walji

Online Education Project Manager, University of Cape Town
Online Education Project Manager, Centre for Innovation, University of Cape Town. Research interests include MOOCs, Online Learning, Unbundled Higher Education, Open Education


Wednesday November 27, 2019 15:05 - 15:35
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

15:10

Energy Sustainability through MOOCs in the Latin American context and Studies of educational innovation in open movement (OEAward19)
Open Innovation:
Interdisciplinary, Collaborative and Open Innovation: Energy Sustainability through MOOCs in the Latin American context


This initiative is part of the 2 6 6 6 3 2 Bi-National Laboratory on Smart Sustainable Energy Management and Technology Training, funded by the National Council of Science and Technology (CONACYT) and by the Energy Sustainability Fund of the Secretariat of Energy of Mexico (SENER).
In the Interdisciplinary, Collaborative and Open Innovation project we worked with new approaches to open education, integrating training solutions and applying OER through 12 MOOCs with innovative strategies, in order to offer new entrepreneurship opportunities to overcome the challenges of energy sustainability.
The development of the project is based on the quad helix strategy for innovation fostering collaborations between Government, Corporations, Institutions, NGOs and Civil Society.
The goal is to support the training of human resources specialized in energy sustainability, and to develop human talent with the necessary capabilities to respond to the technological conditions prevailing in the energy value chain (Electric Power sector), through graduate programs, massive open online courses that will be available nationwide, and endorsed through a competencies certification process.

Open Research:
Studies of educational innovation in the open movement
This open research initiative integrated studies of educational innovation in massive open online courses and open repository systems.
Research contributes to open education by analyzing the effectiveness of strategies, resources and learning in open environments, as well as the challenges of integrating educational innovation into technological systems, where open platforms and technologies have not yet reached their potential for accessibility, usability and availability of the OERs.
The project highlights studies that are carried out by researchers, master students and students of two doctoral programs (Mexico and Spain) that participate in the Educational Innovation Research Group, in the Openergy Network and in the UNESCO / ICDE Open Educational Movement for Latin America Chairs.

Winners of the 2019 Open Education Award for Excellence: Open Innovation and Open Research

Speakers
avatar for María Soledad Ramírez Montoya

María Soledad Ramírez Montoya

Tecnológico de Monterrey
AM

Alberto Mendoza Domínguez

Tecnológico de Monterrey
SC

Silvia Catalina Farías Gaytán

Tecnológico de Monterrey


Wednesday November 27, 2019 15:10 - 15:20
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

15:20

Connected Learning Initiative (CLIx): Technology enabled initiative at scale for high school students (OEAward19)
The Connected Learning Initiative (CLIx) is a technology enabled initiative at scale for high school students. It is a multi-state, multi-partner initiative seeded by Tata Trusts, Mumbai and led by Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA. CLIx offers a scalable and sustainable model of open education, to meet the educational needs of students and teachers.

The initiative won UNESCO's prestigious 2017 King Hamad Bin Isa Al-Khalifa Prize, for the Use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the field of Education.

CLIx incorporates thoughtful pedagogical design and leverages contemporary technology and online capabilities. Resources for students are in the areas of Mathematics, Sciences, Communicative English and Digital Literacy, designed to be interactive, foster collaboration and integrate values and 21st century skills.

Teacher Professional Development is available through professional communities of practice and the blended Post Graduate Certificate in Reflective Teaching with ICT. Through research and collaborations, CLIx seeks to nurture a vibrant ecosystem of partnerships and innovation to improve schooling for underserved communities.

CLIx is being offered to students and teachers of government secondary schools across four states of India in their regional languages and it is also released as Open Educational Resources (OERs). It has reached to 478 schools, 3509 teachers, 244 teacher educators and 70480 students.

Winners of the 2019 Open Education Award for Excellence: OER Collaboration

Speakers
PS

Padma Sarangapani

Tata Institute of Social Sciences
AK

Ajay Kumar Singh

Tata Institute of Social Sciences
OB

Omkar Balli

Tata Institute of Social Sciences
VK

Vijay Kumar

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
SS

Satej Shende

Tata Institute of Social Sciences


Wednesday November 27, 2019 15:20 - 15:30
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

15:35

Coffee/Tea Break
Wednesday November 27, 2019 15:35 - 16:00
Break Area

16:00

Keynote: The Warp and Weft of Open Education and Social Justice
By implication open education subscribes to notions of social justice, but implementation strategies and research often focus on economic injustice to the exclusion of cultural and political inequities. Moreover, despite altruistic motivations, open education activity may unintentionally reproduce many of the existing inequities that it seeks to change. Drawing upon the projects in which I am involved I will highlight the intertwinement of open education and social justice in projects in the global south, by illustrating ways of strengthening equitable access, cultural equality and political legitimacy.

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams

Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams

Associate Professor, University of Cape Town
Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams is an Associate Professor in the Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Learning at the University of Cape Town in South Africa.  She teaches Online Learning Design and Advanced Research Design courses to postgraduate students and also supervises Masters and... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 16:00 - 17:00
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

19:30

Gala Conference Dinner
The Gala Conference Dinner is a highlight in the social programme of the OE Global Conference and provides an opportunity for all to relax and enjoy meeting outside the scheduled conference program.

The 2019 Gala Conference Dinner will be hosted at the La Triennale di Milano. Founded in 1923 and built between 1931 and 1933, La Triennale di Milano is a design and art museum.

The Gala Conference Dinner must be booked as a supplementary option during the Registration process. The Gala Dinner costs $100, which covers a buffet with vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes as well as drinks for the evening. If you did not make a reservation at conference registration but would like to book a reservation for the Conference Gala Dinner, please contact conference@oeconsortium.org or ask at the registration desk if spaces are available.

Getting there:
Metro: Lines 1 and 2, stop Cadorna – Triennale
Bus: Line 61, stop Triennale
Train: Milano Cadorna Railway Station

Wednesday November 27, 2019 19:30 - 22:30
La Triennale di Milano Viale Emilio Alemagna, 6, 20121 Milano MI, Italy
 
Thursday, November 28
 

08:00

Registration
Thursday November 28, 2019 08:00 - 09:00
BL28 ground floor entrance reception area

09:00

Summary Day 1 & 2, Orientation to Day 3
Speakers
avatar for Chrissi Nerantzi

Chrissi Nerantzi

Principal Lecturer in Academic CPD, Manchester Metropolitan University
Chrissi Nerantzi (@chrissinerantzi): Is a Principal Lecturer in Academic CPD in the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at Manchester Metropolitan University in the United Kingdom. Her approach is playful and experimental and she specialises in creative, innovative and... Read More →


Thursday November 28, 2019 09:00 - 09:10
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

09:10

The Path Ahead To an Open Future - Iterating OEC
Paul Stacey, Executive Director of the Open Education Consortium will map out the path ahead for the Open Education Consortium as it works toward an open future. Paul's map will explore the following:
  • Biggest value proposition
  • Member needs assessment and response
  • New identity, name change, logo, url's, rationale
  • New membership categories
  • Regional nodes - global and local
  • Dates for OE Week 2020
  • Announcement of OE Global 2020 location and dates
  • Call for proposals to host OE Global 2021 and 2022
  • UNESCO OER Recommendation Announcement

Speakers
avatar for Paul Stacey

Paul Stacey

Executive Director, Open Education Consortium
Paul is the Executive Director of the Open Education Consortium (OEC) a global, non-profit, members-based network of open education institutions and organizations. OEC represents its members providing advocacy and leadership to advance open education globally. OEC works to build open... Read More →


Thursday November 28, 2019 09:10 - 09:30
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

09:30

Keynote: New Learning Pathways in an Open and Digital World – What might the education landscape look like in 2030?
Have you noticed that we see many creative ideas on how artificial intelligence can be harnessed in education and indeed on how open educational resources can enable more equal access to higher education and to better learning materials – but we are often less creative when we think of the resulting higher education landscape! Most foresight studies centre their ideas on how the university as an institution will look in the future. I will argue that we should start by re-envisioning people’s learning pathways. I will also argue that it makes sense to be bolder in our ideas of the role of higher education.
I will suggest that a leading vision for higher (or tertiary) education should be: To ensure that all members of society participate in higher education at some point in their lifetime.This might sound unrealistic, but with it I hope that we might achieve an important change in perspective. This vision might help us avoid the continuing exclusivity of higher education – which tends to privilege a certain age group (the young) and people of certain backgrounds (what we call in German education-proximal populations, e.g. those people, whose parents attended higher education).
This vision is also appropriate for the learning society we need, which will necessitate new phases of learning throughout everyone’s lifetime. Ignoring this in the case of higher education will only lead to a digital divide along the age groups, with older persons being left out of strategies to help them acquire the skills necessary to a better life in a digital world.
Of course, this vision can only be achieved if we can evolve a more differentiated approach to higher education that is more individualised and more closely linked to people’s learning pathways throughout their life and which takes account of informal and non-formal learning – and not just formal learning periods as ‘registered’ or ‘enrolled’ learner. I look forward to the discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Dominic Orr

Dominic Orr

Research Lead, University of Nova Gorica / Kiron Open Higher Education
Dr. Dominic Orr has dual citizenship in Britain and Germany. He has a doctorate in comparative education from the Technical University of Dresden and was recently appointed Adjunct Professor for Management in Education at the University of Nova Gorica, Slovenia.Dominic currentl... Read More →


Thursday November 28, 2019 09:30 - 10:30
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

10:30

Coffee/Tea Break
Thursday November 28, 2019 10:30 - 10:45
Break Area

10:50

The planet is (an open) school
Since 2018, Karisma Foundation with the support of the Inclusive Design Research Center (OCAD University) has worked with K12 students and teachers in Fresno, a small town in the mountainous region of Colombia. With an inclusive and open approach, Karisma has developed the project named "The Planet is the school". The project aim is to explore the relationship between youth, territory and technology. To reach that goal, we designed an open methodology based on a storytelling approach and using low-tech infrastructure.

In different historical moments, Fresno has been a territory in dispute between different illegal armed forces, in the middle of the armed conflict that Colombia has lived for 60 years. This reality has meant displacements of people from the countryside to the cities, lack of opportunities in the territory, low levels of schooling and little technological development.

Regarding that situation, the project seek to invite the students to ask questions about their future (their future in the countryside or the possibilities of going to the cities) and to know better their own territory. In that sence, the methodology mix artistic spaces, visits to local entrepreneurs and the use of digital tools, to amplify those questions and find possible ways to solve them in collaborative dynamics with a high sense of the local.

An important part of "The Planet is the school" project is the implementation of the Kimera Local Network, since access to the Internet is very limited (or none) and this tool allows students and the teachers can share content.

We want to share this practical experience that set a lot of question about open, equity, inclusion and the stories of the people behind this big concepts.

Speakers
avatar for María Juliana Soto

María Juliana Soto

I´m an independent consultant and creator of contents for communications and visual arts projects in the field of human rights and digital culture. Based in Cali, Colombia.
avatar for Carolina Botero

Carolina Botero

Director, Karisma Foundation
Carolina Botero is the CEO of the Colombian civil society digital rights organization Karisma Foundation. She is a researcher, lawyer, lecturer, writer and consultant on topics related to law and technology. Carolina works in the defence of human rights in technology environments... Read More →
avatar for Diego Mora Bello

Diego Mora Bello

Communications Coordinator, Fundacion Karisma


Thursday November 28, 2019 10:50 - 11:00
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

11:00

The Troubling Prevalence of Apple's Eye of Sauron at Open Education Meetings
A specter is haunting the the open education world: the glowing image of
an apple with one bite taken from its rim -- representing perhaps the
cyanide-impregnated apple with which Alan Turing committed suicide -- which
leers from the backs of a multitude (perhaps a majority) of laptops and
smartphones used by the champions of an education that fosters personal
agency and autonomy. I would like to suggest, however, that it is more
appropriate to think of this symbol as the lidless Eye of Sauron, from the
Lord of the Rings fantasy books which some of us loved as children, where
it symbolized the implacable will to power of the enemy of the free
peoples of Middle Earth.

But if the free peoples of Open Education want an alternative, there is a
very robust one: free/libre/open-source software [FLOSS].

You may complain that FLOSS is surely not as convenient, nor as well-vetted
for quality, nor does it interoperate with your other tools as easily as do
the laptops, phones, and software of Mordor. But aren't these exactly the
arguments used against OER? And just as in that arena, there are many good
answers to these concerns.

In this short presentation I will work through some of the main ideas which
motivate the open education movement, and try to show how they all have
very strong analogies in the ideas behind the FLOSS movement.
Additionally, I will try to answer some of the practical concerns that
prevent the wider use of FLOSS.

Just as we in the open ed movement are often accused of fanaticism, a little
stubborn insistence on using FLOSS wherever it serves autonomy, agency, and
other values of both movements may end up with your abjuring the symbols of
Sauron on your devices!

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Poritz

Jonathan Poritz

Colorado State University-Pueblo


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:00 - 11:10
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

11:00

How the Publishing Industry Co-Opted OER's Narrative and How to Win it Back
The open education movement in North America has gone from a peripheral idea to a central strategy for addressing higher education cost and access issues. With this growth, we have seen new players enter the open education space from commercial publishers to learning platform companies. Vendors are increasingly adopting language that muddies the water about the meaning of open, and reshaping digital products to appear similar to OER while carrying traditional restrictions.

Meanwhile, a larger market shift is at play as large traditional publishers transitioning from mere content providers to technology companies with the potential to build vast empires on top of teaching and learning data. This shift is accelerated by aggressive marketing for “low cost” digital options or “inclusive access” to full catalogs of materials, which are embedding data collection opportunities in every classroom. While data and analytics can be used for good, there is too little conversation about the potential harms and strategic risks. This evolving landscape sets the stage for complex future debates over privacy, algorithms, and control of the infrastructure at the core of higher education institutions.

This short talk will reflect on the state of the courseware landscape in North America and its implications for the future of higher education. How do we continue to hold the line on the meaning and vision of “open”? How do we ensure that infrastructure decisions being made now do not cut short the potential to achieve a truly open system? What steps the open movement can take to make sure we are always putting students first? Reflections will draw on SPARC’s work to map the education and research publishing landscape and some of our thinking on how to advance toward community-controlled infrastructure. Participants will walk away with some answers, but also many new questions.

Speakers

Thursday November 28, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
BL28.12 first floor classroom - Presentations

11:00

Toward a Critical Approach for OER: A Case Study in Removing the ‘Big Five’ from OER Creation
While the literature on OER has problematized other important critical concerns (e.g. the use of free labour in the creation of OER or concerns about academic neocolonialism (Almeida 2017; Amiel 2012; Crissinger 2015; Rhoads, Berdan and Toven-Lindsey 2013; Weiland 2015), the role of proprietary software in OER production requires greater scrutiny: commercial software and closed file formats constrain the potential for subsequent OER use and adaptation. This constraint runs contrary to the principle that OER should be adaptable and reusable (Hilton, Wiley, Stein & Johnson, 2010; UNESCO, 2002).

Drawing existing critical approaches to technology, and recent anecdotal experiments by individuals attempting to forego use of technology and services provided the ‘Big Five’ technology companies (Apple, Alphabet/Google, Amazon, Facebook and Microsoft) (Oberhaus 2018; Hill 2019), we ask what are the implications of removing reliance on technology and software from the ‘Big Five’ from OER production through the use of a case study (focusing on the University of Alberta’s Opening Up Copyright Instructional module series (OUC)).

OUC involves the creation of interactive instructional modules on copyright that are provided under an open licence. The modules rely more heavily on software provided by two of the Big Five, since existing authoring and distribution tools include PowerPoint, YouTube and Google Docs. The case study examines how disembedding these tools introduces content distortions, workflow inefficiencies, additional internalized costs, and a lessened content discoverability. It also considers the impact of the dominance of Amazon on the web services market.

While it is possible to remove the Big Five from OER work, it is not without serious challenges. Although open alternatives exist for many of the services of the Big Five, reliance on the open alternatives introduces new challenges, and in particular a learning curve for both the original content creators and any potential adaptors.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Guy

Julia Guy

University of Alberta
I'm a graduate student currently in my second year of a combined Masters in Library and Information studies and Digital Humanities program and a contributor to the University of Alberta's Opening Up Copyright series.
KJ

Kris Joseph

University of Alberta
MM

Michael McNally

University of Alberta
Michael B. McNally is an Assistant Professor at the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Alberta. His research interests include intellectual property and its alternatives including open educational resources, user-generated content, radio spectrum management... Read More →


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

11:00

Factors Influencing the Acceptance and Utilization of Open Educational Resources by Faculty Members in Higher Education Institutions
Open Educational Resources (OERs) have a distinguished role to play as they are becoming a significant means of education. They provide teaching and learning materials and offer research resources and training. While there is a growing body of literature on OER development and implementation practices, there is a substantial lack of research about OER and its utilization globally (Panda&Santosh, 2017; Hayman,2018).

In addition, as the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is the context of this study, the forward-looking strategy ‘Vision 2030’ prioritises life-long learning. SHMS being a national Saudi OER platform. SHMS is an acronym for the Arabic name "SHabakt alMaward alSaudiah”, which was officially launched in March 2018 aiming to enrich the Arabic educational content to support the advancement of education. Since this platform is still a new phenomenon in Saudi Arabia, the purpose of this study is to explore the challenges and motivations experienced by university academics who adopt SHMS, and identify the barriers hindering those who do not utilize this platform in their teaching activities.

In this research, the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) will be adopted, along with three additional constructs, which are, attitude, information quality and culture, as a lens through which to analyse the research data.

This research will employ a Sequential Explanatory Mixed Methods Design (questionnaires and semi-structured interviews) to examine the academics' perceptions of OER integration into their teaching practices. I will also interview the e-learning assistants in the University in order to investigate their roles in supporting OER adoption by the university academics.

I hope that this work will encourage academics to utilize OER in their teaching activities and provide SHMS stakeholders and other relevant decision makers with the information necessary to improve their system and overcome the challenges that Saudi academics might encounter in their OER adoption.

Speakers
SA

Samia Almousa

University of Leeds


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
BL28.11 first floor classroom - Presentations

11:00

Zero Textbook Cost Degrees: Improving Social Justice or Just Lowering Costs
Session Table Name: BOLOGNA

Canada and the U.S. have recently targeted efforts to create credential pathways where faculty and students use only OER or zero cost instructional materials. These pathways are more commonly called Zed Creds in Canada (Lambert, 2018) and OER/Z Degrees in the US. It is well documented that the significant cost of textbooks which are common in higher education programs in North America present a barrier to student success and timely completion (Florida Virtual Campus, 2016, p.5, p.10) and have a greater adverse effect on traditionally underrepresented low-income and minority students. (Griffiths, et. al, 2018, p.11).

Higher education is a key indicator for social mobility with unemployment rates for 4-year college graduates at about half of the US national average (U.S. Department of Education, 2016). Enrollments of traditionally underrepresented student populations have grown significantly over the last 20 years but equity gaps remain with low completion and graduation rates. Z-Degree programs have been seen as a solution to increasing graduation rates particularly for low income and minority students but early findings have shown low student awareness of these programs. Students who work more than 20 hours per week were less likely to have heard about these opportunities. (Griffiths, et. al, 2018, p.12)

As the Z-Degree programs mature, it is an opportune time to examine more closely how well these programs address the original goals of serving the underrepresented student. Using Fraser’s Social Justice Framework as adapted here (Hodgkinson-Williams, C. A., et. al., 2018), participants will be asked to critically analyze the efficacy and outcomes of current OER/Z-degrees. Suggestions for how to improve Z-degree implementation to enhance social justice will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Una Daly

Una Daly

Director, Community College Outreach, OpenCourseWare Consortium
I am passionate about expanding access to education through the adoption of open textbooks and open educational resources. As the Community College Outreach Director at the Open Courseware Consortium, I work with faculty and staff at community colleges to create awareness and share... Read More →
avatar for James Glapa-Grossklag

James Glapa-Grossklag

Dean, Educational Technology, Learning Resources, and Distance Learning, College of the Canyons
James Glapa-Grossklag is the Dean of Educational Technology, Learning Resources, and Distance Learning at College of the Canyons (California, USA). He directs the statewide CCC DECT grant and also co-coordinates Technical Assistance for the CCC Zero Textbook Cost grant program. James... Read More →
avatar for Tannis Morgan

Tannis Morgan

Advisor, Teaching & Learning and Researcher, Open Education Practices, BCCampus
JK

Janice Kempster

Dean of Distance Education, Pima Community College


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:00 - 12:05
BL27 first floor north corridor - Action Lab

11:00

Action Lab: Improving Remixability of OER Materials
Session Table Name: TORINO

In this Action Lab, we will explore the effects of different Publishing platforms and File formats on re-use, re-mix, and accessibility of OER materials. We will look at different contexts of how different groups of people use materials and discuss how we could adapt publishing practices to serve their needs best. Participants will be empowered to ask hard questions about their publishing decisions and with a more in-depth understanding of why to advocate for Open File formats.

Speakers
JC

Jure Cuhalev

Open Education Consortium


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:00 - 12:05
BL27 first floor north corridor - Action Lab

11:00

Interactive Workshop on the Design and Quality of MOOCs using Moodle
Session Table Name: BOLZANO

This interactive workshop addresses the quality of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and is organized by MOOQ, the European Alliance for Quality of MOOCs, and Moodle, the leading open international Learning Management System.

Main goal of the interactive workshop is the discussion how we can improve the design and quality of MOOCs using the open platform Moodle.

First, the results from latest MOOC research including the Global MOOC Quality Survey (GMQS) and the resulted Quality Reference Framework (QRF) for MOOCs will be introduced.

Second, the open platform Moodle will be explained in relation to its usage for designing MOOCs.

Leading question will be: How can we benefit from the Quality Reference Framework and the Moodle platform to improve future design and quality of MOOCs?

The hands-on interactive workshop of 50 minutes combines different methods:

In the first short part (10 minutes), the results of the latest MOOC research on the MOOC quality will be presented including the introduction of the Quality Reference Framework as valuable instrument for both, MOOC beginners and experts.

In the second short part (10 minutes), the Moodle platform will be introduced by the Moodle founder explaining options to design and run MOOCs using Moodle plugins.

The main third part (30 minutes) is a hands-on question-and-answer session debated in an Interactive World Cafe style: All quality criteria from the Quality Reference Framework as well as all Moodle plugins are investigated as to how they fit and contribute to improve the quality of MOOCs for learners, designers and providers of MOOCs. The results from the small groups will be presented in a short plenary. Finally, next activities towards a joint future collaboration and activities are explored by all participants.

Intended audience: All experts, practitioners and novices sharing interest in Open Education and the quality of MOOCs

Speakers
avatar for Martin Dougiamas

Martin Dougiamas

CEO, Moodle
Martin Dougiamas is best known as the founder of Moodle, the popular learning platform used by millions of educators around the world.As the CEO and Chairman of Moodle Pty Ltd in Perth, Western Australia, he leads the team of software developers at the heart of the Moodle project... Read More →
avatar for Christian M. Stracke

Christian M. Stracke

ICDE Chair in OER and Associate Professor for Open Education, Open University of the Netherlands
Dr. Christian M. Stracke is ICDE Chair in OER and Associate Professor for Open Education at the Welten Institute of the Open University of the Netherlands (OUNL) (www.ou.nl/web/welten-institute). In addition he is Advisory Professor at the East China Normal University (ECNU) in Shanghai... Read More →


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:00 - 12:05
BL27 first floor south corridor - Action Lab

11:00

OER World Map Action Lab 2019
Session Table Name: GENOVA

The OER World Map is the most ambitious approach of the OER community so far to collect data about and for itself. Using Linked Open Data technology, it is a state of the art reference system, which provides a unique identifier for each building block of the OER ecosystem, allowing educational professionals from different disciplines to organize their knowledge in a shared system with hitherto unknown precision and reliability. The OER World Map Action Lab is a chance to meet the OER World Map team and discuss your ideas with us, ask us, what you would like to know about the project or even start hacking together immediately. Invited are established and new OER World Map Country Champions, partners, platform users and everyone who is interested in the initiative.

Speakers
JN

Jan Neumann

Head of Legal Affairs & Organization, Hochschulbibliothekszentrum des Landes NRW
MA

Matthias Andrasch

North Rhine-Westphalian Library Service Centre


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:00 - 12:05
BL27 first floor south corridor - Action Lab

11:10

Embedding research in education via a wiki
It is important that results from scientific research becomes embedded in the curricula of both universities, schools of applied sciences and schools for secondary vocational education. In the Netherlands, researchers and teachers from “agricultural education” guarantee this by collaborating in making educational material via a community called the “the green knowledge network” (Groen Kennisnet). A nice example of this collaboration are wiki’s that have been created under supervision of Wageningen University & Research – Library. These wiki’s have clear innovative themes, linking science to practice, and are published on an open platform so they can be used easily in courses as digital (open) textbooks. During this short talk we would like to show you our wiki’s, the way they have been created via de Confluence platform and how they are implemented in education. Furthermore, we would like to present our plan to organize workshops for teachers and researchers in other educational theme’s about the technique of making a wiki in Confluence, the translation from science to education and the possibility to publish the wiki’s on an open platform as digital open textbooks.

Speakers
avatar for Marijn Post

Marijn Post

Hogeschool Arnhem Nijmegen/ Wageningen UR
At the moment I am an advisor in ICT and Learning at the HAN university for applied sciences but until oktober 2019 I worked as an information specialist at WUR-Library. I am an expert in open learning materials, copyrights, and implementing ICT to improve education. At the moment... Read More →
avatar for Marian Van Harmelen

Marian Van Harmelen

Wageningen UR
Working as an information specialist in the Education Support team of the Library, teaching information literacy in several courses is an important part of my work. In addition, I work on topics such as finding and using open educational resources and copyrights in teaching materials... Read More →
avatar for Rob Van Genderen

Rob Van Genderen

Chief editor Groen Kennisnet, Wageningen University & Research
I'm an information specialist in Wageningen University & Research - Library and chief editor / content manager Groen Kennisnet. Groen Kennisnet is a Dutch OA platform to disseminate knowledge from research to professional education. Groen Kennisnet hosts Open textbooks in Confluence... Read More →


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:10 - 11:20
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

11:20

From Classroom to Consortium: Impacting Students with Open at Different Levels of Magnitude
Open education is transforming the way that students engage with formal educational structures, from individual instructors applying open pedagogical practices in their classrooms to institutional consortia working towards open degree and certificate pathways.

This presentation provides an overview of how open educational practices are impacting students at different magnitudes, from the classroom to the consortium.

Specifically:
-What open pedagogy looks like in the first-year classroom at a community college
-How an open pedagogy project can be deployed across a network of classrooms at different colleges
-Why a consortium of institutions must commit to a shared vision of openness when embarking upon an open textbook initiative

To illustrate these points, the presentation will share:
-Open in the Classroom: the results of a 2016-17 scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) study that involving the transition from a “disposable” to a “renewable” assignment in First-Year Composition courses
-Open across Colleges: the process and product of a year-long effort to jumpstart a “renewable” anthology of literature across different community colleges
-Open Scaled: the progress of the Consortium for Open Active Pathways (COAP), a project in its initial stages funded by the US Department of Education’s Open Textbooks Pilot grant, which involves three of the largest community college systems in the United States--Ivy Tech, Maricopa, and Miami-Dade--along with Arizona State University in the development of degree pathways infused with active learning

Ultimately, the session seeks to articulate, despite how strange it may seem, how the implementation of open at any magnitude can affect open at other levels of magnitude, from a single instructor’s experimentation with open pedagogy informing the decisions of a consortium to the work of multiple institutions to develop open pathways reshaping an individual instructor’s classroom.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Bloom

Matthew Bloom

English Faculty / OER Coordinator, Maricopa Community Colleges


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:20 - 11:30
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

11:35

Open at Scale: Doing More Together
In the last decade, many jurisdictions and institutions have identified open education as a strategic priority. Potential for cost-savings and flexible pedagogy often compel decision makers to consider open education as a policy mechanism to off-set the increasingly costly and difficult reality of higher education.

When policy-makers approach open education as a band-aid solution the funding takes a similar shape. It’s one time. It’s limited. It’s bound up within the constraints of a fiscal year. And, the bodies responsible for this funding, such as eCampusOntario, are forced to act quickly. Funding is distributed in an ad hoc fashion, and the ripple effect continues. Tiny pockets of good work surface and fizzle. No real progress is made in any particular direction or with any particular goal.

While the funding streams for open education may remain precarious, there is an opportunity to break the cycle and realize the potential of a strategic, coordinated approach to OER development.

eCampusOntario has recently launched the Open at Scale initiative, an approach that originated in Ontario through conversations with passionate practitioners and discipline leaders such as deans and directors, that saw an opportunity to pursue open education at a systemic level. Open at Scale is a targeted approach to open educational resource (OER) development. It is the decision to focus on a single subject vertical, identify gaps in the landscape, leverage existing assets and build out the rest.

This session will share the Ontario framework for Open at Scale and invite participants to consider strategies for the coordinated development of open educational resources across multiple jurisdictions in a single subject vertical. Discussion will focus on the foundational principles and values held by participating partner organizations to achieve maximum success while maintaining independence and appropriate jurisdictional oversight.

Speakers
avatar for Lena Patterson

Lena Patterson

Senior Director, Programs and Stakeholder Relations, eCampusOntario
Lena has been a part of the eCampusOntario team since the organization opened shop in August 2015. She worked closely with the government to establish the consortium model in Ontario and now heads up a growing project team in her role as Senior Director, Programs and Stakeholder Relations... Read More →


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:35 - 12:05
BL28.11 first floor classroom - Presentations

11:35

Researching the registry: establishing an open education policy dataset
Much discussion of open education policy has occurred at the supranational level and in some cases, nations and subnational governments have taken up the challenge of incorporating open resources and practices into policymaking. What is less clear, and less straightforward to investigate is the extent to which individual institutions are developing policy to support openness. This session reports on work in progress towards the author's current study of OE policymaking in higher education institutions.

In order to sketch some key features of the OE policy landscape for this wider study, it is necessary to collect and examine a wide range of existing institutional policy documents. The OER Policy Registry is an existing dataset, previously maintained by Creative Commons, which has been imported into the OER World Map (oerworldmap.org) in 2018.

At the time of writing the registry contains 148 policies, or more accurately, records of policies indicating the source organisation and link and some metadata regarding type. It is not yet clear whether the current metadata held and/or schema are well-suited to the use cases of potential visitors to the registry. Furthermore, it is not yet clear that all records represent an actual 'policy', and if not, what other designations will be most appropriate.

Therefore, prior to conducting research based on the registry as dataset, there is a need to audit the contents of the registry to understand what exactly it contains and establish inclusion and exclusion criteria for this aspect of the study, as well as helping to enhance the use of metadata to describe the current collection and future entries. This session will tell part of the author's research story, of identifying and describing an OE policy dataset, and initial findings from the investigation.

Speakers
avatar for Leo Havemann

Leo Havemann

Digital Education Advisor / Postgraduate Researcher, Open University / University College London
Please see my other profile here:https://oeglobal2019.sched.com/leohavemann


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:35 - 12:05
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

11:35

Open Science Strategic Plan: the next step in Open Education at Delft University of Technology
In 2007 Delft University of Technology launched their OpenCourseWare website. In the university strategic framework 2018-2024 openness is one of the core principles in our strategy. To operationalize the framework, we have been working on a strategic plan for open science. This is drive by our internal strategic framework and external incentives from the Dutch government. Our current government has a strong focus on making open science the norm for universities. The Dutch ministry of education has the goal that “All teachers in higher education share and reuse open educational resources in 2025”.

The new strategic plan addresses these goals along five project lines: Open Access, Open Publishing, FAIR Data, Open Software, Open Education.

There are also three cross-cutting themes that are pre-conditions for a successful implementation:
- Rewards & Recognition: Open Science asks for new incentives and systems for rewards & recognition.
- Intellectual Property and copyright: Open Science asks for more clarity about ownership of research, data, copyright issues and valorisation
- Skills: Open Science asks for new skills in the fields of data management, sharing technologies, educational materials, reusing OER, documenting and use of meta data.

Based on the Open Education Leadership Summit in December 2018 in Paris, we have created a roadmap for Open Education that is aligned with the existing activities, our strategic framework and other activities in the Open Science Strategic Plan.

The over-arching goals is to embed open education in the regular operation. This includes open educational practice in our teacher training programme, excellent teacher support on open education, open as requirement for software services, standardized processes for OpenCourseWare, MOOCs and OpenTextBooks.
It also includes new initiatives, such as replacing commercial textbooks with open resources, collaborative content creation, and altmetrics for open education.

Speakers
avatar for Willem van Valkenburg

Willem van Valkenburg

President Open Education Consortium, Delft University of Technology
President of the Board of Open Education Consortium.


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:35 - 12:05
BL28.12 first floor classroom - Presentations

11:40

Back to the futOER, or about the open tribulations of a learning developer
When the Ljubljana OER Action Plan 2017 identifies building the capacity of users to find, reuse, modify and share OER; language and cultural issues; ensuring inclusive and equitable access to quality OER; developing sustainability models and supportive policy environments as the challenges to mainstreaming open education, the role of non-academic staff is subsumed under the ‘other stakeholders’ category. Yet if we imagined a scenario without these OER actors, how open would our future be?
This brief presentation brings to the fore the role that learning developers can play in carrying out some of the concrete actions suggested in the Ljubljana OER Action Plan to foster open education. It is the author’s personal account of how openness becomes (or not) part and parcel of the design, production, delivery and evaluation of online and blended courses in a higher education institution in The Netherlands.

Speakers
avatar for Beatriz de los Arcos

Beatriz de los Arcos

Delft University of Technology


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:40 - 11:50
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

11:50

New Case Studies of Openness: Empowering educators to share their practice
Much of the work of integrating openness in the language classroom goes largely unreported to the education community. Several factors contribute to this state of affairs. First, educators are willing to reuse content but generally have low awareness of OER and are more focused on pedagogical enhancement than in openness per se. Second, even those who are more engaged with OER tend to share a perception of their practice and the resources they use as highly contextualised and contingent, and therefore of little value for reuse (Beaven, 2018). Finally, educators are busy and there are currently few incentives or support for them to share their practice with the teaching community, particularly through publications.

This brief talk presents an openly published collection of case studies, New Case Studies of Openness in and beyond the Language Classroom, conceived to give practitioners a voice and a space to contribute their experiences to the open education community, thus surfacing some of the work currently being undertaken to integrate openness in language education. The volume was written by and for practitioners.

The concept of openness was widened to represent a mindset and a set of pedagogical values that make use of ‘the open nature of the internet’ to facilitate ‘significant change in education’ (Weller, 2017) and that acknowledge ‘the complex, actual and situated practices of teaching and learning’ (Cronin & MacLaren, 2018). Consequently, the open practice reported in this new publication extends to engaging with open communities and organisations outside education, and beginning to realise the potential of openness for connecting language learners with the richness of the world outside the classroom.

Speakers
avatar for Anna Comas-Quinn

Anna Comas-Quinn

The Open University
Senior Lecturer in Spanish, School of Languages and Applied Linguistics, The Open University, UK
BS

Barbara Sawhill

Bowdoin College
AB

Ana Beaven

University of Bologna


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:50 - 12:00
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

12:00

The Library as Open Publisher: supporting OER creation on campus
Today many libraries are seeking new creative partnerships with faculty in open textbook and OER creation. This presentation will review a case study at a library that is in initial stages of establishing an open textbook publishing program. At Kwantlen Polytechnic University (BC, Canada), the Library set up a suite of services in order to support our faculty in the creation of OER and to help enable Zero Textbook Cost courses. We started small with an internal open education grant to test the concept of ‘Library as Open Publisher’. Based on that small success, we followed by extending the service through an expanded granting opportunity with the library taking on publishing projects in larger and various capacities. We found that services, once offered, were met with unexpected enthusiasm and evolved in unexpected ways. In this presentation, we will explain our processes and workflow to date for creating the library as open publisher. In this new publishing environment, what are we seeing and how do we recommend starting up these services? What strategies accelerate or hinder progress? We will discuss practical approaches, philosophical conundrums, and a general overview of our service in its early stages. How can we manage expectations? What will be our capacity to sustain it? Come and find out!

Speakers
KM

Karen Meijer-Kline

Kwantlen Polytechnic University


Thursday November 28, 2019 12:00 - 12:10
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

12:10

Open Pedagogy through Community-Directed, Student-led partnerships: Establishing CURE (the Community-University Research Exchange) at Temple University Libraries
This presentation reports on the establishment of an open pedagogy initiative between community organisations and students, facilitated by the Temple University Libraries (TUL) and faculty partners in the Philadelphia area. This project facilitates community organisations’ direction and autonomy in promoting beneficial research objectives. It also foregrounds students as the directors of their own knowledge output and learning.

CURE (the Community-University Research Exchange) produces community-driven social-justice research. The CURE team solicits research questions and project proposals from grassroots community organisations who experience social and economic marginalization limiting or even disallowing the access to information that is vital to innovating the services organisations provide. Community-directed research questions are made available for students to browse on a dedicated webpage. Students select from a bank of research projects, identifying issues that they wish to investigate, skillsets they hope to master, or organisations for who they hope to contribute their intellectual labour. CURE enables students to choose projects that are not only appropriate to their field(s) of study, but also relate to their personal commitments or interests, and to existing community engagements. Many students participating in CURE do so for their honours thesis, independent study, or term papers - all for credit.

Openness is both the social and political philosophy that grounds CURE and the framework that animates its practical applications. CURE is designed as a pedagogical tool that calls upon all project stakeholders to directly grapple with components of openness to reach a consensus towards reorienting the relationship between those who traditionally benefit from and those who are exploited in the course of producing knowledge.

In reporting on our experiences in establishing CURE at Temple University Libraries, we hope to share our successes and failures so that local organisations elsewhere can similarly partner with knowledge centres to establish CURE programmes of their own.

Speakers
avatar for Urooj Nizami

Urooj Nizami

Resident Librarian, Temple University
Urooj Nizami is a Resident Librarian at Temple University Libraries. She received her Masters in Information Studies from McGill University in 2016. Urooj is currently working to innovate her library's approach to Open Education through open pedagogical approaches and the incorporation... Read More →
avatar for Adam Shambaugh

Adam Shambaugh

Temple University



Thursday November 28, 2019 12:10 - 12:40
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

12:40

Lunch
Thursday November 28, 2019 12:40 - 13:25
Break Area

14:15

Implicit Analytics in Online OER Platforms
Hosting of most online resources comes with a wide range of implicit analytics built into each platform. All significant content platforms (e.g., YouTube, Slideshare, Facebook) feature detailed analytics that are accessible to content uploaders. There is also an aspect of Analytics tools such as Google Analytics or self-hosted Matomo. However, that is not all; servers also create access logs as well as Content Delivery Networks do.
The purpose of this talk is to start a discussion on all the data that we are implicitly and explicitly gathering around our OER materials, its usage and how visitors are informed about it.

Speakers
JC

Jure Cuhalev

Open Education Consortium


Thursday November 28, 2019 14:15 - 14:25
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

14:15

Challenges and Solutions to Creating Accessible OERs with AR, VR, and MR
Augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR) and mixed reality (MR) are exciting technologies to explore in finding new ways to bring history, stories, science and the arts to life in a way that entertains, engages and ultimately educates students. While newer and sexier, these technologies are not the solution to every project. You must first ask yourself why AR, VR or MR? What problem would these technologies solve for you? Would another medium be more effective in reaching your goals? If AR, VR, or MR is the right fit for your project, then what are the AR, VR, or MR challenges in addressing the needs of your project - looking at everything from connectivity, to ease of use, to comfort, to hardware, to funding …etc?

To aid in answering these questions, we explore case studies from a number of organizations, around the world, using AR, VR, and MR as educational solutions. In the process we will examine the challenges and successes that they have had with these technologies. Additionally, we will explore their decisions in making their creations open, free, or restricted, and why.

Speakers
avatar for Erica Hargreave

Erica Hargreave

Head of Creative and Interactive, Ahimsa Media / UBC / BCIT / NVIT in partnership with the First Nations Technology Council
I tell stories immersively and interactively across platforms of media, and teach on such things around the world and at post-secondary schools here in Canada. A few of my more unique areas of expertise are in the creation of storyworlds, digital and transmedia character development... Read More →
LY

Lori Yearwood

Ahimsa Media


Thursday November 28, 2019 14:15 - 14:45
BL28.11 first floor classroom - Presentations

14:15

Including the excluded, connecting the disconnected: lessons from a large scale experiment in India of designing open educational technologies that work for all
Efforts to harness technology for improving school education have gained traction internationally. However, these efforts have been reported to encounter multifarious challenges ranging from poor ICT infrastructure to wicked problems of technology design, implementation models and inadequate teacher capacity building. In resource constrained contexts, these challenges get exacerbated by various other systemic and non-systemic factors. In this presentation, drawing upon our experiences from a large scale technology enabled educational intervention - Connected Learning Initiative (CLIx) – in India, we present and discuss aspects of design, development and deployment of scalable EdTech solutions that provide learning opportunities in low-tech and resource constrained environments.

Speakers
SS

Satej Shende

Tata Institute of Social Sciences


Thursday November 28, 2019 14:15 - 14:45
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

14:15

Open Platforms for Open Educational Resources
At CUNY we have chosen to focus on the development of CUNY-based free open source software platforms that can serve open materials and enable open pedagogy. We propose a presentation will demonstrate and describe the development and use of these software platforms.The platforms we will discuss are Commons In A Box, https://commonsinabox.org/, and Manifold Scholarship, https://cuny.manifoldapp.org/. Both platforms build on successful local implementations at CUNY campuses that were later abstracted, through grant funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, to create robust software that any institution can use. Together, they offer vibrant spaces to build collaborative communities of practice around teaching, learning, and research, and to publish OER work in multimodal, interactive formats.

“Open” should denote not only the learning materials that faculty and students create and use, but also the underlying platforms. When we ask ourselves, “Why Open?” “Open for whom?” and “Whose interests are served?” the answers should center both students and faculty. By supporting free open source software, non-proprietary platforms, we can build our work in conversation with student and faculty communities, and help other educational communities adopt similar approaches in their own work.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Amaral

Jean Amaral

Open Knowledge Librarian, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY
GC

Gina Cherry

Director of Borough of Manhattan Community College Center for Excellence in Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship (CETLS), Borough of Manhattan Community College , CUNY
AF

Ann Fiddler

Open Education Librarian, City University of New York, CUNY


Thursday November 28, 2019 14:15 - 14:45
BL28.12 first floor classroom - Presentations

14:15

CC Certificate: Come play and improve our course!
Session Table Name: BOLZANO

The Creative Commons (CC)* Certificate is the first official training to develop individual and institutional expertise in open licensing, using CC licenses. The program is an investment in advocates in open movements – a way to build and strengthen our collective open licensing and “commons” expertise.

The CC Certificate provides an-in depth study of Creative Commons licenses and open practices. Content targets copyright law, CC legal tools, as well as the values and good practices of working in the global, shared commons.

The Certificate training is built for iteration--after each class, CC updates elements of instructional design and communication.

Join us on one crucial part of our improvement! Help us refine the instructional design for a lesson. In this Action Lab, presenters will provide an overview of the CC Certificate content and one of the most challenging lessons in the course. Presenters and audience members will co-create an improved set of analogies and examples with which to facilitate the lesson.

Resulting from this Action Lab, audience members will (1) gain an understanding about the Certificate and deeper insight into the instructional design; and (2) inform future instructional design with their co-creation. Input will be integrated into the 2020 online course as well as in-person “bootcamps.”

*Creative Commons (CC) is the nonprofit organization that builds and stewards the legal tools, technologies, and programs to power open movements around the world. CC provides open licenses and public domain tools that have become the global standard for sharing, helping people share knowledge and creativity with simple, legal permissions. CC licenses have been applied to more than 1.6 billion works across 9 million websites, and are used by global movements in open education, arts and culture, government, science, and more.

Speakers
avatar for Jennryn Wetzler

Jennryn Wetzler

Assistant Director of Open Education, Creative Commons


Thursday November 28, 2019 14:15 - 15:20
BL27 first floor south corridor - Action Lab

14:15

Screencasting for Active Learning and Engagement
Session Table Name: BOLOGNA

With the popularity of Kahn Academy, TED Ed, and YouTube educational videos like the Crash Course series, it is clear that students often seek video resources to help them learn and understand content. But sometimes, the readily available videos do not fully cover the competencies you want your students to learn. Screencasting is a tool that you can use to create your own instructional videos to tailor them exactly how you want them. Screencasting is especially helpful when flipping the classroom or teaching online. Screencasting can also be used as an open pedagogy tool.

Screencasting refers to digitally recording information on a computer screen, often with voiceover audio recordings to accompany the visuals. Screencasting often refers to recording audio while viewing a slideshow, like a PowerPoint or Google Slides Presentation, but it can also include providing audio instruction while showing students how to navigate a website or use a computer program. Additionally, tablets such as the iPad Pro and Surface Pro, and their advanced styluses, such as the Apple Pencil, can be used as a digital whiteboard allowing someone to draw out a concept while providing an audio recording of what is being shown.

The purpose of this action lab is to demonstrate the use of screencasting technology for the creation of open educational resources and in open pedagogy assignments. Audience members will be encouraged to ask questions, brainstorm ideas with other participants, or bring their own device (tablet, smartphone, or laptop computer) to try out screencasting technology.

At the beginning of the session, we will demonstrate how we have leveraged screencasting software and apps, such as “Explain Everything” and “Screencast-o-matic”, to produce open educational resources and provide a new level of student engagement. We will discuss best practices along with the benefits and challenges of combining OER with screencasting.

Speakers
SP

Sian Proctor

South Mountain Community College
LR

Lauren Roberts

Biology Faculty, South Mountain Community College


Thursday November 28, 2019 14:15 - 15:20
BL27 first floor north corridor - Action Lab

14:15

SPLOTs in Action: Targeted Tools, Targeted Goals
Session Table Name: GENOVA

Learning management systems (LMS) have become an essential teaching tool in the higher education sector and almost all universities use one or more different systems (Pomerantz et al., 2018). Teachers use LMS primarily as an administrative tool such as informing students about tasks, giving feedback on these and posting lecture slides (Dobbin, 2016), and the LMS has been accused of not being very suitable for a social constructivist pedagogy. What is needed instead are tools that are easy to use and which are perceived to be useful by students as well as teachers (Šumak et al., 2011).

Towards this end, some educational developers are pursuing a focused and functional approach to integrate targeted, yet simple, educational tools (cf. Groom and Lamb, 2014). They call these simple tools SPLOTs. The acronym SPLOT was coined by Brian Lamb (Levine, 2014) and while it’s difficult to pin down an exact definition (Splot.ca, 2019), the focus is on simple tools that protect student privacy while providing powerful opportunities for students to create and share media that directly align with learning objectives. SPLOTs support and value open education while making it as easy as possible to post activity in an appealing and accessible way.

The leaders of this Action Lab have extensive experience at developing and implementing SPLOTs in a vast variety of different open online as well as campus courses in the United States as well as Europe. In this Action Lab, we will focus on participants using SPLOTs in experiential ways. Participants will get a feel for the simplicity of the tools and how faculty can use diverse media to create community, share information, and spur creativity. All of our actions will remain as an open resource that can grow and expand beyond this conference Action Lab.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Woodward

Tom Woodward

Assistant Director of Learning Innovation and Onli, Virginia Commonwealth University
avatar for Jörg Pareigis

Jörg Pareigis

Head of Centre for Teaching and Learning, Karlstad University
Open education advocate and Head of the Centre for Teaching and Learning at Karlstad University, Sweden.


Thursday November 28, 2019 14:15 - 15:20
BL27 first floor south corridor - Action Lab

14:15

Guidelines on the Development of Open Educational Resources (OER) Policies: A Manual for Policymakers
Session Table Name: TORINO

In close collaboration with UNESCO and Commonwealth of Learning (COL) we have produced a manual for policymakers to develop guidelines on the development of policies for OERs.See guidelines here: https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000371129

We will carry out an Action Lab to showcase how the guidelines and particularly the questions at the end of each of the chapters can be used to help formulate a fully-fledged policy. Dominic will briefly present the Guidelines and then Ben and Dominic will help moderate group work, which will occur here on the Etherpad. 

Way of working: 
  1. 10 mins - Presentation by Dominic on the Guidelines
  2. Participants will divide themselves into groups of no more than 4 persons, give themselves a team name and log-in to Etherpad. 
  3. 20 mins - Each group will try to answer the 3 questions from the end of Chapter 2 of the Guidelines
  4. 20 mins - Each group will try to answer the 4 questions from the end of Chapter 3 of the Guidelines
  5. 10 mins - Wrap-up: each team will briefly present their outcomes

Speakers
avatar for Ben Janssen

Ben Janssen

Director, OpenEd Consult / Fontys Universitity of Applied Sciences
Besides my research work for the UNESCO Chair on OER at Fontys University of Applied Science in Eindhoven (NL) (UNESCO-Chair-OER.htm), I am the founder and director of OpenEd Consult, a not-for profit research and consultancy firm in the field of open education (http://www.openedconsult.nl/en)Prior... Read More →
avatar for Dominic Orr

Dominic Orr

Research Lead, University of Nova Gorica / Kiron Open Higher Education
Dr. Dominic Orr has dual citizenship in Britain and Germany. He has a doctorate in comparative education from the Technical University of Dresden and was recently appointed Adjunct Professor for Management in Education at the University of Nova Gorica, Slovenia.Dominic currentl... Read More →


Thursday November 28, 2019 14:15 - 15:20
BL27 first floor north corridor - Action Lab

14:25

Media Portal for STEM teaching
The Siemens Stiftung Media Portal for STEM teaching has consisted entirely of OER since April 2018. Some 4,000 media on health, energy, and the environment, available in English, German, and Spanish, are designed to support teachers in all school types and grade levels. More than 53,000 users from 120 countries utilize our OER and methodology guides or our student-only area.
The Media Portal celebrates its tenth anniversary in 2019. The objectives in converting it to an OER portal was to lower the barriers to access, boost the distribution of digital media, promote the use of OER through teaching methods and real-world content, and raise awareness on how to use OER.
The run-up to the changeover required a review of our Articles of Association and the law governing foundations. In addition, we checked all the media: whether they could be adapted as OER and whether necessary resources were available. Mostly we could renegotiate user rights with the authors, since we had carefully documented the copyright information from the outset. Today, detailed rules ensure that all legal requirements are met when creating new media. Together with educational experts, we ensure the content is neutral, complete and has the necessary pedagogical-didactic depth. Each medium is assigned file attributes, metadata, and user rights.
• We want more people to create OER legally compliant and share them with us. The lack of knowledge about copyright law and license models is a major obstacle for OER.
• The OER must reach the people who need them: Indexing correctly makes it possible for media to be found, and as many portals as possible should be linked.
• Particularly in developing nations, OER alone are not enough. We must also support the creativity and resourcefulness of teachers who cannot teach digitally due to a lack of infrastructure.

Speakers
avatar for Corinna Hartung

Corinna Hartung

Project Manager Media Portal for STEM, Siemens Stiftung
Since 2018, Corinna Hartung has been project manager for STEM education at Siemens Stiftung, focusing on digitalization and OER. She is strongly committed to make the Media Portal widely known.Her professional background: * Start of her work life as a teacher* Author, designer and... Read More →


Thursday November 28, 2019 14:25 - 14:35
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

14:35

NECESSARY AND SUFFICIENT CONDITIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND ADOPTION OF INSTITUTIONAL OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INITIATIVES: THE CASE OF UNIVERSITIES IN A DEVELOPING COUNTRY
This proposal reports on research that aims to identify the necessary and sufficient conditions for universities in a developing country to develop and adopt institutional OER (Open Educational Resources) initiatives, as experienced by stakeholders from five private, nine public universities and one association in Vietnam. In the past two decades, many researchers have researched OERs and their related issues. However, only a small number of studies explore the development of OER initiatives in the context of universities in developing countries. This research takes a grounded theory approach to analyse data from 20 semi-structured interviews. The average duration of interviews was 75 minutes. NVivo 12 was used to help organise, store, connect and retrieve data. A significant and timely outcome of this research is a general framework that assists universities, especially universities in developing countries, to build OER initiatives effectively and economically. Among the conditions identified in the findings, policy and human resources appear to be the most significant for institutional OER initiatives development in Vietnam. An understanding of the necessary and sufficient conditions for the development and adoption of institutional OER will facilitate as well as encourage more universities to build OER initiatives. (As one of the biggest challenges of the OER movement in Vietnam is the awareness of stakeholders about the nature of OER and its benefits, it is worth noting that the research activity itself raised awareness of the importance of OER among the diverse stakeholders in this country.) This research offers an opportunity to develop a better understanding of the issues associated with institutional OER initiatives, which can then underpin future OER development and adoption. This research thus has implications for research as well as practice in the open education movement in general and the OER movement specifically.

Speakers
avatar for Vi Truong

Vi Truong

PhD candidate, Monash University


Thursday November 28, 2019 14:35 - 14:45
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

14:50

Community of Practice and OER adoption: a successful formula? Preliminary results of research in progress.
Collaboration between teachers has gotten increased attention over the past decades. Concepts as professional learning communities, communities of practices, workplace learning, informal learning and social networks has evolved rapidly. However, little is yet known about the value of communities on teacher learning and changes in practices, especially in relation to open educational resources (OER). Recent research showed that the adoption of OER in Dutch Higher Education is limited. This study focuses on the value of teacher communities in relation to sharing, using and creating OER. Hence, the research question that will be central in this study is formulated as: How does teachers’ interaction and collaboration within a national community in the Netherlands impact teacher learning and their practices with OER? This presentation will focus on the progress of a longitudinal study on teacher learning, interaction and practices in a national community on Nursing. The results of the baseline measurement will be presented. In addition to this, the research design for the follow-up studies is presented and preliminary findings will be shared as well.

Speakers
avatar for Marjon Baas

Marjon Baas

Educational Technologist, PhD student, Saxion University of Applied Sciences
avatar for Robert Schuwer

Robert Schuwer

Fontys University of Applied Sciences
WA

Wilfried Admiraal

ICLON, Leiden University
EV

Ellen van den Berg

Saxion University of Applied Sciences


Thursday November 28, 2019 14:50 - 15:20
BL28 ground floor classroom - Presentations

14:50

Flexible Delivery of English & Mathematics with OpenLearn: Impact of Bringing Learning to Life and Flexible Essential Skills (UK)
Until 2012 there was a nascent OER movement developing the UK, supported by government funding and agencies like JISC. This led to a network of OER projects at many higher education providers. With the withdrawal of funding under subsequent governments the OER movement in the UK became restricted to individual efforts alongside hubs of activity (OER World Map, 2019; JISC, 2013). While there is still little governmental support for OER - open access is generally a more consistent focus - there is an increasing interest at policy level in flexible and digital forms of delivery (Orr et al., 2018).

This presentation will report on two projects. Bringing Learning to Life is funded by the UK Department for Education under the Flexible Learning Fund. Flexible Essential Skills is funded by The Higher Education Funding Council for Wales (HEFCW). Both projects involve making foundational English and Mathematics courses available to a wide range of learners through the OpenLearn repository and LMS (Law & Perryman, 2017). The content is made available as OER for use by a range of learners, including formal students in further education colleges (face-to-face, blended) and non-formal learning scenarios. Both projects are led by The Open University (UK) who provide programme management, content development, platform delivery and evaluation.

Evaluation methodologies are being harmonised in the interests of establishing a basis for comparison between the two datasets. Evaluation results based on original data will be presented. These will include a detailed description of the learners targeted and their needs; perceptions of the key challenges faced; attitudes towards technology and digital skills in adult learners; an exploration of learner motivation, strategy and outcomes; and an examination of the perceptions and views of staff. The impact evaluations combine survey and interview data with OpenLearn analytics and case studies for individual colleges.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Farrow

Robert Farrow

Research Associate, The Open University
Research Fellow @openuniversity / Open Education through a philosophical lens / Projects: @oer_hub @gogn_oer @oerworldmap @JIME_journal / Cat: @tailz_of_terror Project URLS: http://oerhub.net/ https://oerworldmap.org/ http://go-gn.net/ http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/


Thursday November 28, 2019 14:50 - 15:20
BL28.11 first floor classroom - Presentations

14:55

All you need to know about the OER World Map in 6 minutes and 40 Seconds
The OER World Map is an open information network, which educators and other members of the open education movement can use to share data and information on their activities in order to facilitate cross border information sharing, interaction and collaboration. It is highly versatile and supports different communities of practice like OER advocates cooperating on collecting OER-policies or librarians identifying high quality repositories world wide. Its unique selling point is the provision of contextual information, which results from interlinking the different datasets. The presentation aims at summarizing the key concepts needed to understand and actively support this thrilling project. Special focus will be given to the lessons learned so far from our efforts around community development in 2019.

Speakers
JN

Jan Neumann

Head of Legal Affairs & Organization, Hochschulbibliothekszentrum des Landes NRW


Thursday November 28, 2019 14:55 - 15:05
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

15:20

Coffee/Tea Break
Thursday November 28, 2019 15:20 - 15:50
Break Area

15:50

UNESCO OER Recommendation
The UNESCO Recommendation on Open Educational Resources (OER) is expected to be adopted by 195 UNESCO member states at the November session of the UNESCO General Conference just days before OE Global19. This is a unique and important milestone offering, if adopted, a major opportunity to advance open education around the world.

This panel will highlight for OE Global19 participants what the Recommendation says including:

Five areas of action:
  1. Building capacity of stakeholders to create, access, use, adapt and redistribute OER
  2. Developing supportive policy
  3. Encouraging inclusive and equitable quality OER
  4. Nurturing the creation of sustainability models for OER
  5. Facilitating international cooperation

Monitoring and reporting:
  • Deploying appropriate research programmes, tools and indicators to measure effectiveness
  • Collecting, presenting, and disseminating progress, good practices innovations and research reports
  • Strategies for monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness and long-term financial efficiency of OER

Panelists will engage in discussion of next steps involved in supporting implementation of the UNESCO OER Recommendation.

Speakers
MJ

Mitja Jermol

Jozef Stefan Institute
avatar for Paul Stacey

Paul Stacey

Executive Director, Open Education Consortium
Paul is the Executive Director of the Open Education Consortium (OEC) a global, non-profit, members-based network of open education institutions and organizations. OEC represents its members providing advocacy and leadership to advance open education globally. OEC works to build open... Read More →



Thursday November 28, 2019 15:50 - 16:30
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)

16:30

Conference Closing Session
Thursday November 28, 2019 16:30 - 16:50
BL28 Carassa Dadda (plenary)